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Japanese Ainu & Global Indigenous Groups: What Aborginal Religions are your favorite?

Discussion in 'Christianity and World Religion' started by Gxg (G²), Apr 28, 2015.

  1. Zoness

    Zoness 667, neighbor of the beast Supporter

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    This is interesting to me, thanks for sharing. I am somewhat interested in the ethnicities of Russia so I think it is neat that they have genetic connections to Americans. I'm somewhat surprised its the Altaic people though, I figured it would be like the Yakut people by pure geography. but that's definitely not my field of knowledge.
     
  2. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    It makes sense, to me, that it would be the Altaic people...
     
  3. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    Concerning what was noted before....

    I forgot to mention earlier that some of the ways that migration has occurred for Native American groups can be very interesting when seeing how extensive it can be. In example, I am reminded of the Olmecs.... They lived within the area of Mexico..the first 'major' civilization in Mexico.


    The Ancient Olmec Civilization the People of the Forest and builders of colossal - YouTube



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    The Olmecs have been mainly accepted as responsible for advanced civilization in the Americas....and the Mother Culture of all other Indigenious cultures in the Americas. Olmec heads, called "Negroid Statues" in the 1920's when they were found, have continued to baffle many since they have features that simply do not reflect the culture of the Indigineous peoples in the Americas...and resemble the features of those in Africa more so. One of the greatest anthropologists of all time has sought to do much work on the issue...and his name is Ivan Van Sertima. One excellent book on the issue that really blessed me was under the name of "They Came Before Columbus"


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    For more info, one can go online and look up his video presentation..



    Or they can go here to African Presence in Early America.​

    Ivan Van Sertima is a Guyanese historian, linguist and anthropologist ....and his work, "They Came Before Columbus", is a compelling and superbly detailed documentation of the presence and legacy of Africans in ancient America. Examining navigation and shipbuilding; cultural analogies between Native Americans and Africans; the transportation of plants, animals, and textiles between the continents; and the diaries, journals, and oral accounts of the explorers themselves, Ivan Van Sertima builds a pyramid of evidence to support his claim of an African presence in the New World centuries before Columbus. It was especially interesting to see the dynamics of the Moors, as it concerns some of the trade routes over the Atlantic they developed and how many have discussed that the rise of Eurocentric thought dominated much of history only after the age of Moorish domination in Spain for 400yrs prior.....alongside influence that happened in many differing European countries. Ivan in his book went into great detail telling of the sea routes Africans or Malian Moors were able to use to sail over here prior to Columbus, supporting the theory by the engravings found in the Cockaponset forest by John Gallager (Archeologist & Professor from Fordham University) and correlating it with the inscription found on the Haj Mimoun Rock in East Morocco and deciphered by Barry Fell, which records Moors (Blacks) being here a thousand years before Columbus

    A lot of that is not surprising seeing that the descriptions Columbus gave of others present amongst those he saw in the Caribbean were people of African appearance...and other scholars have noted the same. William Katz of the book "Black Indians" did a lot of work on noting those realities, as seen here, here , and here).

    Going back to the Olmec issue, the "Negroid" Statues that others have still been unable to understand, many have often pondered how was it that people seemingly from African could come all the way to the Americas.

    For myself. I am open to the fact that they did indeed travel extensively. ....seeing how other cultures managed to come over on ships to the New World. If the culture spawning the Olmecs was simply far more advanced that all others at the time---just as China at one point was highly advanced and had the technology to travel across continents far before the Maritime Exploration of the Europeans---then its possible that ships were used to travel.

    Again, its just a theory..and for more solid review on the history of the Olmecs, one can go online/investigate the following under their respective titles:





    Claiming that the Negroid Statues in the Americas may be due to Transpacific influences is something that I have also been open to---and as it concerns other scholars saying that the statues came from Asian influence rather than African and Asians came before Columbus to the Americans (more discussed here, here, here, here, here , here, here and here), that's something I'm more than ready to accept....
     
  4. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    Awesome review on the struggle for the Ainu...

    Japan's Ainu
     
  5. Superhero Sam

    Superhero Sam Newbie

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    What is your view on the Ainu origins-Polynesian?
     
  6. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    Could you clarify a bit more with the specific aspect you'd like for me to address?
     
  7. Superhero Sam

    Superhero Sam Newbie

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    People talk about how the Ainu look European, and some speculate they are of Polynesian origin.
     
  8. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    Again, can you give me some specifics? Which people talk on the Ainu looking European? Is there a link or source you have in mind one can get some background reference?
     
  9. Superhero Sam

    Superhero Sam Newbie

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    They don't have a Japanese look.
     
  10. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    Again, do you or don't have a link? And as they are Japanese and Japanese don't say they don't look Japanese, what is your source?
     
  11. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Evangelical Catholic Supporter

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    Have you seen the film Ten Canoes? I thought it was a good look at Australian aboriginal religion and culture. I took anthropology in college but seeing it up close in a story was much more engaging.
     
  12. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    Oh wow :) I have not seen the film and would love to investigate it. Is there a specific aspect with the film you liked as it tackled Aboriginal culture?
     
  13. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Evangelical Catholic Supporter

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    It's considered one of the best depictions of pre-contact aboriginal culture ever made. I especially appreciated the depiction of their spiritual beliefs, it did so in a dignified way that humanized the people. Not like Hollywood cliches of how Native Americans are usually depicted in film (sentimentalized and idealized).
     
  14. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    I am glad that such presentations were done since so many seem to dehumanize on a myriad of levels...


    Aboriginal culture is fascinating and when seeing the specific struggle they faced (similar to Tecumseh in his work with others), it makes them seem all the more complicated.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2017
  15. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    In light of the dynamic of Hawaii, When I was back in D.C recently, I was VERY glad that the National Museum of the American Indian had an exhibit dedicated to exploring the issue.

    There was an excellent documentary on the issue that was playing called "Act of War: The Overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation" (https://zinnedproject.org/materials/act-of-war-the-overthrow-of-the-hawaiian-nation/ ), covering in detail what happened with Hawaii and what others are saying today when seeing how the nation was annexed despite what the people advocated for. I was blown away at how extensive the history was and I have to say that it made me pause at several points when I considered how people in the U.S today would feel if another nation came in, took over territory and promised to be fair - but then told the people "We did this for your safety." We would have a fit - yet Native people in our land have been saying this for centuries and we tend to ignore them. It is not patriotism to say we're concerned for the fate of our nation against foreign invaders and yet ignore how extensive our history has been on the matter. Hawaii is just one example among many others - but I am glad for people covering history in what is being addressed today.

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    There are other excellent documentaries one can investigate some of the other aspects of what happened with Hawaiian people in their backgrounds, as seen in the following:

    "Conquest of Hawaii" ( )
    "Hawaii's Last Queen" ( )
    "An Interview with Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask by Rebekah Garrison" ( ).​

    And for anyone wondering, the history of Hawaii did not simply impact Hawaiians. During the Civil War era, people were greatly impacted and other Hawaiians ended up fighting during that war for a nation that was not truly their own. The excellent documentary entitled "Hawai'i Sons of the Civil War: A Documentary Film" (Hawai'i Sons of the Civil War: A Documentary Film | Facebook ) really helps to bring the issue home.


    But as said before, our history of Native Americans/Indigenous people has not truly been respectful


    I've always found it amazing when seeing/experiencing Orthodox practice from a Polynesian perspective - as seen in Orthodoxy and Hawaiian Culture. Beautiful work, IMHO :)

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    Last edited: Mar 12, 2017
  16. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    Something that came to my mind recently - if wanting to document the experiences of Indigenous Peoples abroad - can be found here at Mapping Indigenous LA. For further reference:


    Our main map, Mapping Indigenous LA, tells general stories of Los Angeles while listing a few places we collaborated with to hone in on the materials and options you have to make your own story map. We know that there are many more stories about what it means to live in LA as an Indigenous person and we would love to hear about how you, your family, your community, or your organization has created LA as an Indigenous place.

    At times the uploading of pictures and maps may take a few seconds and we ask for your patience. A main goal of this project was to provide a digital network for communities to tell their own stories and learn from each other. For now, enjoy the maps we have below that just begin to tell the story of Mapping Indigenous Los Angeles!
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    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  17. Superhero Sam

    Superhero Sam Newbie

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    This article talks about Nilotic origin?

    Just Genesis : The Nilotic Origin of the Ainu
     
  18. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    As an aside, for anyone interested, here's an excellent presentation on the ways that Indigenous cultures are linked across continents. As it concerns Asia and Oceania, I find it fascinating when seeing how many of their ancestors were from Africa, but left East Africa before the ancestors of other Asians and Europeans.

    Specifically, This is the series called "Hidden Colors 2"


    Some things I did research further and I did appreciate them bringing up issues that many have not considered.




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    It is well established that modern humans originated in Africa, before moving out to inhabit rest of the planet. They first spread into Asia and Europe via the Arabian Peninsula, and those in the Far East eventually reached America and the Pacific islands.

    However, this simple picture does not explain several groups found across Asia and Oceania. Now, by looking at genetic and archaeological data, researchers think they might have found the answer, confirming theories that humans migrated out of Africa more than once.

    Across Asia, people are usually similar in appearance to those around them. However, there are scattered populations on islands and in other isolated areas that look quite distinct. These people are sometimes collectively called Negritos (while this may sound archaic, it is the accepted scientific term). Along with Papuans, Melanesians and aboriginal Australians, they are generally much darker-skinned and curlier-haired than their neighbours.

    One explanation is offered by the “beachcomber” theory. The first modern humans that settled in Arabia were probably east African fisher-folk who crossed the Red Sea in boats. In this new land they stuck to their coastal lifestyle, rather than head inland for a whole new set of challenges. As their numbers increased, with the sea as a reliable food source and with boats for mobility, they could spread very quickly along the coast of South Asia, crossing inlets and reaching islands, until they eventually found and populated Australia. Later, inland Asian lifestles could become established and support much larger populations, which could spread south, replacing or absorbing our beachcombers in all but the most isolated locations.

    This neat hypothesis seemed to have the problem solved until genetic studies were done, which grouped each Negrito population with its neighbours, rather than with other Negritos and Australasians. So why the similar appearance? Could it be that they have each separately evolved the same set of useful traits to live in a similar hot, coastal environment, in which case why have their neighbours not done the same?

    A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, tackled this conflicting evidence. Scientists used mathematical modelling to explain the genetics as well as the skull shapes observed across many Asian and Australasian populations. This involved testing several alternate histories to see which one is best able to explain the modern situation. Each model must be simple enough to understand, and between them, they must cover the likely possibilities.

    The models tested could be described as:

    1. A population travelled eastwards inland and spread south from there
    2. A population travelled along the beachcomber route and then spread north
    3. A population took each route without interbreeding
    4. A population took each route, they met and interbred
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    The four models charted. Reyes-Centeno/PNAS 2014
    The reality is, of course, much more complicated, with millions of individuals living, travelling and breeding with no idea of an overall pattern. To this day, people leave Africa (and settle there), or in other words, there have been many, many out-of-Africa migrations. Nevertheless, identifying the model that best explains your observations can give you a good approximation of the most significant truths.

    The study found that the fourth model best explained both the genetic data and the skulls for the Negrito population. This means that there were at least two significant out-of-Africa migrations contributing to today’s populations – one taking a coastal route and the other an inland route.

    Negrito populations appear to have a mixture of beachcomber and inland ancestry. Australians, Melananesians and Papuans seem to descend from beachcombers alone. While other Asian populations – including Dravidian speakers, the majority of south Indians, also sometimes suggested as descendants of beachcombers – appeared to descend predominantly from the inlanders.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2017
  19. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    Do you know anyone from Russia who is ethnically related?

    As an aside, I came across this recently and I was SO thankful :)

    Beautiful seeing people in Hidden Places you would never have expected before, as Siberia is such a vast world (and I am forever thankful for one of my friends I was able to interview from Siberia for a graduate school project, as he noted how vast that part of the globe is). As said there (for a brief reference):


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    Hi! My name is Alexander Khimushin. Nine years ago I packed my backpack to see the world and have been globe-trotting ever since visited 84 countries. While travelling the world, I realized that people are the most amazing part of it.

    Three years ago I came up with an idea of the photo project 'The World In Faces' that would celebrate beauty and diversity of the world through the portraits of ordinary people. Especially from those remote places, where culture and traditions are still alive. Since then I have taken thousands of portraits all over the world. Last six months I photographed indigenous people of Siberia.

    An enormous region, almost a double size of Australia and 30% larger than the United States, Canada or the whole Europe. Siberia is one of the world’s last frontiers of the unknown. No doubt, everyone heard that it is very cold and sparsely populated, but what do we know about people living there?

    During my half-a-year-long solo journey, I covered 25,000 km to visit many remote locations across Siberia: from lake Baikal shores to the coast of Japan sea, from endless steppes of Mongolia to the coldest place on Earth - Yakutia. All with only one mission - to capture faces and traditions of various groups of indigenous people living there. While some of the ethnic groups are dominant in their regions, many others are on the edge of disappearance, with a total population as low as only a hundred people left. They remain largely unknown to the outside world.

    More info: khimushin.com | Facebook | Instagram


    #1 Dolgan Girl
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    Report

    #2 Ulchi Woman
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    #3 Sakha Girl
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    #4 Evenki Little Reindeer Herder
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    #5 Ulchi Girl
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    #6 Evenki Elder
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    #7 Uilta Little Girl
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    #8 Sakha Girl
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    #9 Evenki Little Girl
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    #10 Nivkhi Man
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  20. Gxg (G²)

    Gxg (G²) Pilgrim/Monastic on the Road to God (Psalm 84:1-7) Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    As an aside @Zoness , I forgot to mention earlier that It'd would be awesome to see them starting to make maps there for all the Indigenous groups in China, as I've had several friends bring this up. One of them (Hmong) shared with me how others forget China is not monolithic and has done the same things the U.S. has done to Natives - it is horrendous. The experiences of what occurred with the Hmong (of Laos, who were scattered all over the world after being abandoned by the U.S to the Communists ) that alone is a problem. ​




    Reading on this group back in 2012 for a project on Intercultural perspectives, I was reminded of one of my friends from China who knew Hmong and shared his experiences with ethnic groups in China who experienced a Diaspora abroad because of covert wars. One of the books I had to read on them was called "The Latehomecomer" (on the experience of Kao Kalia Yang as a refugee from Laos with her parents) and it was powerful seeing the stories of individuals who've been largely hidden in American history.









    So glad the Hmong are being remembered for their sacrifices when the U.S fought a war by proxy ...then bailed out when they lost, with many Hmong not acknowledged for their work until recently while others moved out West to find refuge without being taken seriously. This is not a new reality and one I pray more come to be aware of when seeing what life is like for others in America.

    Many are still without benefits ...

    But that's simply the experience in the U.S. Their Indigenous struggle has not been seen fully still in China with the Hmong who came there...

    Oddly enough, the Chinese (PRC) government does not recognize the term “indigenous peoples”, ...But certain groups like Tibetans and the Uighurs still suffer terrible human rights abuses.​

    But yes, there are so many varied ethnic groups in China and it really makes a difference seeing them all:




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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
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