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History of the Reformation by J. H. Merle D'Aubigne

Discussion in 'Book Club' started by EvangAlived, Aug 26, 2018.

  1. EvangAlived

    EvangAlived WakeUpSleepyHead

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    The History of the Reformation! I am almost done with this series, and I am on the last book (powerful, inspiring, saddening, maddening, rejoicing, valour, betrayal, scandal, victory, royalty, intrigue, love, awesome works of God and mighty deliveries, special individuals, Martin Luther against all the powers of Europe, George Wishart's final words and prophecy, Geneva's battle for survival, Philip of Hesse's bravery and surprising actions, Duke' John Frederick the Elctor of Saxony; John Knox; Henry VIII's reign, Emperor Charles V reign; Francis I of France reign, Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain; the Inquisitions):

    History of the Reformation Volume 1 - https://archive.org/stream/historyofreforma01lind#page/n7

    History of the Reformation Volume 2 - https://archive.org/stream/historyofreform02lind#page/n5

    History of the Reformation In the Time of Calvin Volume 1 - https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet...In-Europe-In-The-Time-Of-Calvin-Vol-I#page/n5

    History of the Reformation In the Time of Calvin Volume 2 - https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet...n-Europe-In-The-Time-Of-Calvin-Vol-Ii#page/n3

    History of the Reformation In the Time of Calvin Volume 3 - https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet...-Europe-In-The-Time-Of-Calvin-Vol-Iii#page/n1

    History of the Reformation In the Time of Calvin Volume 4 - https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet...n-Europe-In-The-Time-Of-Calvin-Vol-Iv#page/n1

    History of the Reformation In the Time of Calvin Volume 5 - https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet...In-Europe-In-The-Time-Of-Calvin-Vol-V#page/n1

    History of the Reformation In the Time of Calvin Volume 6 - https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet...n-Europe-In-The-Time-Of-Calvin-Vol-Vi#page/n3

    History of the Reformation In the Time of Calvin Volume 7 - https://archive.org/stream/cu31924092350895#page/n5

    History of the Reformation In the Time of Calvin Volume 8 - https://archive.org/stream/cu31924092350903#page/n9

    An excerpt of the life of George Wishart:

    "... ATTEMPTS ON HIS LIFE

    Nevertheless, at the cardinal's [David Beaton] instigation, says Knox, a priest named Wighton took a sword, and concealing it under his gown mixed with the crowd as if he were a mere hearer, and stood waiting at the foot of the steps by which Wishart must come down. The discourse was finished, the people dispersed. Wishart, whose glance was keen and whose judgment was swift, noticed as he came down the steps a priest who kept his hand under his gown, and as soon as he came near him he said, "My friend, what would ye do?" At the same moment he laid hold of the priest's hand and snatched the weapon from him. The assassin fell at his feet and confessed his fault.

    Swiftly ran the report that a priest had attempted to kill the reformer, and the sick who heard it turned back and cried, " Deliver the traitor to us, or else we will take him by force." And so indeed they rushed on him. But Wishart put his arms round the assassin. "Whosoever troubles him," said he, "shall trouble me, for he has hurt me in nothing." His friends however insisted that for the future one of them, in arms, should accompany him wherever he went.

    “... [page 225] When the plague had ceased at Dundee, Wishart thought that, as God had put an end to that battle, he called him to another. It was indeed proposed that he should hold a public disputation. He inquired of the bishops where he should be heard. But first he went to Montrose "to salute the kirk there," and although sometimes preaching the Gospel, he was "most part in secret meditation, in the [page 225-226] which he was so earnest, that night and day he would continue in it."

    While there, he received a letter purporting to be written by his friend the laird of Kynneir, who being sick desired him to come to him. But it was a trick of the cardinal. Sixty armed horsemen were lying in wait behind a hill to take him prisoner. He set out unsuspecting, but when he had gone some distance, he suddenly stopped in the midst of the friends who were accompanying him and seemed absorbed in deep musing. Then he turned and went back. "What mean you?" said his friends, wondering. "I will go no further," he replied: "I am forbidden of God. I am assured there is treason." Pointing to the hill he added, "Let some of you go to yon place, and tell me what they find." These brave men reported with all speed what they saw. "I know," said he, "that I shall end my life in that bloodthirsty man's hands, but it will not be of this manner." ...” - The Reformation in Europe in the time of Calvin. Volume VI (6) Scotland, Switzerland, Geneva, by the Rev. J. H. Merle D'Aubigne, D.D. Transalted by William L. R. Cates, joint author of Woodward and Cate's 'Encyclopedia of Chronology'; editor of 'The Dictionary of General Biography', etc.; London: Longmans, Green, and CO. 1875; London: Printed by Spottiswoode and Co., New-Street Square and Parliament Street; page 225-226 (PDF 249) - https://archive.org/stream/historyreformat06daubuoft#page/n249/mode/1up/

    https://archive.org/stream/historyreformat06daubuoft#page/n248/mode/1up

    George Wishart's Last Words:

    “... [page 245 (PDF 268)] The cardinal and his accomplices beheld from the windows the martyr and the fire which was consuming him. The governor of the castle watching the flames exclaimed, "Take courage." Wishart answered, "This fire torments my body, but noways abates my spirit." Then catching sight of the cardinal at the window with his courtiers, he added, "He who in such state, from that high place, feedeth his eyes with my torments, within few days shall be hanged out at the same window to be seen with as much ignominy as he now leaneth there in pride." This was literally fulfilled about two months later.

    He had hardly uttered those words when the rope was tightened about his neck, so that he lost the power of speaking. The fire reduced his body to ashes; and the bishops, full of steadfast hatred of this servant of God, caused an order to be published that same evening through all the town, that no one should pray for their victim under the [page 245-246 (PDF 268-269)] severest penalties. They knew what respect was felt for him by many even of the Catholics themselves.

    There are people who say that religion is a fable. A life and a death such as those of Wishart show that it is a great reality. ...” The Reformation in Europe in the time of Calvin. Volume VI (6) Scotland, Switzerland, Geneva, by the Rev. J. H. Merle D'Aubigne, D.D. Transalted by William L. R. Cates, joint author of Woodward and Cate's 'Encyclopedia of Chronology'; editor of 'The Dictionary of General Biography', etc.; London: Longmans, Green, and CO. 1875; London: Printed by Spottiswoode and Co., New-Street Square and Parliament Street; page 245-246 (PDF 268-269) - https://archive.org/stream/historyreformat06daubuoft#page/n268/mode/1up/
    https://archive.org/stream/historyreformat06daubuoft#page/n269/mode/1up/

    George Wishart's prophecy fulfilled:

    "... CHAPTER XV
    CONSPIRACY AGAINST BEAUTON – HIS DEATH
    (March to May 1546.) ...

    Fullfillment:

    “... [page 254 (PDF 277)] The cardinal fell under repeated blows, without a word heard out of his mouth except these, 'I am a priest! I am a priest! Fie, fie! All is gone!'

    … his partizans only cried the louder, 'We shall never depart till we see him,' still persuaded that he was alive. Then one or two men took up the body, and bearing it to the [page 254-255 (PDF 277-278)] very window at which a little while before Beauton had sat to contemplate with gladness, and as if in triumph, the execution of the pious Wishart, exposed it there to the gaze of all. Beauton's friends and the populace, struck with amazement and terror by the unexpected sight, and remembering Wishart's prediction, dispersed in gloom and consternation. ...” The Reformation in Europe in the time of Calvin. Volume VI (6) Scotland, Switzerland, Geneva, by the Rev. J. H. Merle D'Aubigne, D.D. Transalted by William L. R. Cates, joint author of Woodward and Cate's 'Encyclopedia of Chronology'; editor of 'The Dictionary of General Biography', etc.; London: Longmans, Green, and CO. 1875; London: Printed by Spottiswoode and Co., New-Street Square and Parliament Street; page 254-255 (PDF 277-278) - https://archive.org/stream/historyreformat06daubuoft#page/n277/mode/1up
    https://archive.org/stream/historyreformat06daubuoft#page/n278/mode/1up
     
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