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The Reformation Study Bible

Discussion in 'Confessional, Covenantal, Creedal - Presbyterian' started by ProgressivePresbyterian, Jan 22, 2017.

  1. ProgressivePresbyterian

    ProgressivePresbyterian Social Worker

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    I'm wondering if any of my fellow Reformed/Calvinist Christians use the Reformation Study Bible? If not, what study bible do you use?

    I was looking for a study bible that's Presbyterian-friendly, like the Catholics and Lutherans have their own study bibles. I found this, and I'm considering getting it. I love a good study bible.

    Link: The Reformation Study Bible edited by R.C. Sproul
     
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  2. Shane2336

    Shane2336 Slave of Christ Supporter

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    Have you considered the 1599 Geneva Bible?
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2017
  3. Archie the Preacher

    Archie the Preacher Apostle to the Intellectual Skeptics

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    I listen to R. C. Sproul quite often. (I was going to say 'every day' but I have conflicts in scheduling 'often'.) I think he is sound theologically and doctrinally.

    At the same time, I tend to shy away from a study Bible with anyone's name on it. I might make an exception for some teachers, Sproul included. I would want to see the actual content prior to committing money.
     
  4. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It's one of my favourite study Bibles for sure.

    If you know of R. C., you probably know of Dr Steven Lawson. Dr Lawson uses the study Bible as part of every sermon preparation and I think there's a lot to be said for that.

    This, the MacArthur study Bible and the ESV Study Bible are my go-to study tools.

    It's worth the investment. You won't be disappointed.
     
  5. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I can take some photos of some of the pages if you'd like. Just let me know.
     
  6. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This is a booklet that accompanies it.

    [​IMG]

    Topical Articles and Theological Notes overview

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    Theological Notes closer look

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    In-Text Maps and Illustrations

    [​IMG]

    Intro to Genesis

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    Intro to Genesis continued

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    Intro to Genesis continued

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    Intro to Genesis continued

    [​IMG]

    Intro to Genesis continued

    [​IMG]

    Genesis overview

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    The text itself and formation of notes in two examples(in-paragraph/in the text block and also at the bottom of the page).

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I hope these help.

    Have a blessed Lord's Day.
     
  7. Archie the Preacher

    Archie the Preacher Apostle to the Intellectual Skeptics

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    Thank you very much. I'm more interested in how it is worded. Is is a modern English style, or is it one of the faux-17th Century sort of things?
     
  8. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There's a sample of it here that may help you better determine that.
     
  9. hedrick

    hedrick Senior Veteran Supporter

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    This was the first study Bible based on the ESV. It's got very solid conservative Reformed comments and articles. If you're Presbyterian and interested in conservative theology, I think you'll like it. Sproul is the editor, but there are enough contributors that it's not just a personal effort.

    "Is is a modern English style, or is it one of the faux-17th Century sort of things?"

    It's ESV. That's the RSV modified to fit conservative tastes. As such it's in the King James tradition, though wording is significantly modernized.

    As you're probably aware, there are a number of different approaches to translation. This one is formal equivalence. That is, it tries to preserve as much of the structure of the original language as possible. To my knowledge all formal equivalence translations have similarities in wording to the KJV, though in this one (as in RSV and NRSV) vocabulary has been updated.

    One of the characteristics of the ESV is that they really try to stick with the original language structure as much as they can and remain usable in English. That means it is in some respects more literal than the RSV on which it's based. E.g. a lot of sentences and phrases begin with "and" in the Gospels, because they're reproducing the "kai" in the original.
     
  10. hedrick

    hedrick Senior Veteran Supporter

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    If you want to get as close to the structure of the originals as possible (i.e. formal equivalent) you're choices are really ESV, NASB or N/RSV. All of these have great similarities to the KJV, for good reason. To avoid the "faux KJV," you'll need a looser translation. As I wouldn't recommend the NIV to my worst enemy, that probably means HCSB for conservatives or CEB or TEV for non-conservatives.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2017
  11. Archie the Preacher

    Archie the Preacher Apostle to the Intellectual Skeptics

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    Thanks. I'll think about it.

    As I mentioned, I shy away from any one person's 'official' view of the Bible. However, I do trust Sproul as much or more than anyone else on the subject.
     
  12. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree. It's why I have multiple sources to consider a balanced understanding.

    I have multiple study bibles, commentaries by MacArthur, Calvin's complete commentaries, Luther's sermons in book form etc. It is sometimes a roundabout way of getting an answer, but some things require a lot of digging.
     
  13. Archie the Preacher

    Archie the Preacher Apostle to the Intellectual Skeptics

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    I applaud your approach. One of my pet peeves about Bible study and life in general is what strikes me as a superficial approach to - most everything. Now I have a tendency to 'soap-box', so thanks again.
     
  14. Calvinist Dark Lord

    Calvinist Dark Lord Regular Member

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    As Shane2336 advocated above, i also use the 1599 Geneva Bible (the first English Translation with verse numbers) for my day-to-day English reading.

    The real wealth of the 1599 Geneva is the commentary of that particular bible. However unless you're comfortable with the Old Oxford English Dictionary, you may want to go with a more recent English version. Some words are archaic. i don't know if R.C. Sproul and the editors of the New Geneva Study Bible used the 1599 Geneva notes, but would not be surprised if they did.

    The recently published English Standard Version appears to be a good compromise between readability and accuracy to the text. It was the successor the 1952 Revised Standard Version, which i miss. (New Revised Standard Version is not near so good, and it sacrifices accuracy for an agenda). The New American Standard Bible is slightly more literal, but the reading is a bit "choppy".

    Like Hedrick, i would not recommend the NIV. It is my opinion that the publishers were far too convinced that their dynamic equivalent translation method was the way to go that they often used it where a more literal translation technique would have rendered some texts more readable.
     
  15. AMR

    AMR Presbyterian (PCA) - Bona Fide Reformed

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    Probably the best Reformational bible published was Pratt's edited NIV Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible. It is very hard to find and included all the Confessions with notes and links to the Confessions along with the usual cross references and plenty of articles on Reformed doctrines. It used to be online: http://thirdmill.org/studybible/ and ebook versions are available if one looks hard enough.

    If you find one, expect to pay a handsome price for the leather versions, despite the NIV translation. The Ligonier Reformation Study Bibles came out of this initial collaboration between Pratt and Sproul. Ligonier's RSB is nice, but never has come up to the same level of depth in articles and notes that the SOTRSB possesses.


    To compensate, and not wanting to ruin my leather SOTRSB, I found a hardbound version, removed all the Confessions and placed them in my own KJV reference bible, along with spending quite a bit of time making handwritten notes from all the other content in the SOTRSB to my bible. That took almost a year of effort off and on. I am currently annotating (about 15 minutes every other day or so) my personal bible with all the WCF chapter and paragraph proof texts (see attached). It has taken three years and I am only up to chapter 12.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Geralt

    Geralt Reformed Supporter

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    i bought the RSB print book, articles are limited though and i dont use it (the print) anymore.

    i mostly do studies now using electronic formats (ebook versions of study bibles and systematic theology books) since my eyes get too strained from reading small fonts in print copies..that's me getting older; at least in the laptop/desktop screen i can just about zoom-in to a readable size and use all kinds of color markings. so i also bought the RSB ebook version.

    the ESV Study Bible (Crossway, Matthew 1) has its own website where you can study and read the entire book and make notes online and keep it - something RSB does not have yet. if you buy their bible it comes free with a registration key for using esv.org online) very useful if you do work in a table. Online, Piper's sermons & articles in some parts of scripture are also link to the study bible, very nice esp when studying Romans.

    for group bible study sessions, i just use the normal big font ESV Large Print Personal size bible (Font size 12) so it is really good in the eyes to read, and lightweight to carry around. i believe they will release a premium calfskin version this March 2016..check christianbook.com
     
  17. ChadTheHoser

    ChadTheHoser Keep Your Stick On The Ice! Supporter

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    I have purchased the NIV, Life Application Study Bible. I haven't got to much reading done with it, But so far I'm enjoying the explanations in the book. How do you stand on this Study bible?

    Cheers,
    Chad
     
  18. pilgrim1999

    pilgrim1999 Newbie

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    Actually, that distinction ironically goes to the Scofield III, which was issued in the ESV somewhere around 2002-2004 and went out of print after a few years.

    (How typical of me to post here for the first time in forever and start nitpicking) But what you're likely thinking of is that once the Reformation Study Bible was published in 2005, it was the main Study Bible in the ESV out there until the ESV Study Bible was finally published in 2008. I think the MacArthur came out in the ESV around 2009-2010.

    AMR is quite correct about the virtues of the NIV Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible, which I reviewed here. (Other than Laridian, apparently it isn't available anymore in any of the other ebook formats mentioned in that post and the comments.)

    I haven't really looked at the revised Reformation Study Bible (i.e. the Ligonier/Sproul one) that is available in both the ESV and NKJV, but I expect the gap between it and the NIV Reformation Study Bible (edited by Richard Pratt) to have narrowed considerably. The notes have reportedly been expanded and it now includes creeds and confessions.
     
  19. hedrick

    hedrick Senior Veteran Supporter

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    I've been unable to find a reference before 2006. That's what Amazon's out of stock listings say, and I haven't seen any earlier references. That would put it after then ESV edition of the Reformation Study Bible.
     
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  20. pilgrim1999

    pilgrim1999 Newbie

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    I stand corrected. Amazon is not always correct when it comes to Bible specifications (whether in print or OOP) but neither am I. But I checked other sources (including GoodReads) and they also say 2006.

    I think the Scofield III was issued in the NKJV in 2002 and then rather quickly in other versions, so I thought the ESV would have been issued before 2005. Looks like I'm wrong! I may have also been thinking of the HCSB. I'm pretty sure the Scofield was the first Study Bible in the HCSB unless the Apologetics Study Bible came out just before it.

    The copyright on the ESV is 2001, but I don't think it was actually available in print until early 2002. In retrospect it may seem like three years or more is a pretty long time to wait for a Study Bible in a popular version. But no doubt there was uncertainty about just how popular the ESV would be. It happened to be published around the time the "New Calvinism" was really taking off and it was bolstered by a good many high profile endorsements.

    On the other hand, the NIV Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible (2003) was published right about the time many Reformed people were abandoning the NIV, which likely played a big role in its demise, along with the appearance of the ESV Reformation Study Bible. That's despite the fact that the study helps in the 2005 edition were inferior in almost every way.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2017
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