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  1. D.A. Wright

    D.A. Wright Unworthy Recipient Of Unfathomable Love Supporter

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    What caused the great drops of blood to fall from Christ's brow in Gethsemane? Was He not "walking in the Spirit? He warned us to be ready for that which He endured. No servant is greater than his Master.

    The idea that people can overcome sin without a struggle is the height of absurdity. Has the devil gone to sleep? Does he leave us be when we cling to Jesus? Temptation with no power is no temptation at all.

    Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour. (1 Peter 5:8)

    Beware of teachers who teach as though they have mastered the Pauline epistles. Especially the ones who have wildly popular and successful television ministries. The Gospel is best served in the Gospels. Trying to interpret fine points of Theology from the writings of the Great Apostle before first mastering the lessons of Christ is like matriculating into a Doctor of Philosophy program before finishing junior high school.

    And remember, our Lord’s patience gives people time to be saved. This is what our beloved brother Paul also wrote to you with the wisdom God gave him—(2 Peter 3:15) NLT
    Paul talks about these same things in all his letters, but part of what he says is hard to understand. Some ignorant and unsteady people even destroy themselves by twisting what he said. They do the same thing with other Scriptures too. (2 Peter 3:16) CEV

    This will, no doubt, be construed as name-calling on my part.
    Take it up with The Author: The Holy Ghost
     
  2. Airaux

    Airaux New Member

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    LlewellynStevenson: What do you make of Paul's admission (slightly paraphrasing, from memory) - "That which I want to do, I do not; that which I want not to do, I do; Oh, wretched man that I am - who will deliver me from this death?", if you think Paul achieved perfect sinlessness?
     
  3. bmjackson

    bmjackson Newbie

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    He had come to the point of utter helplessness in obeying the commands and failing but by Romans 8 he was delivered from the flesh and sinless.
     
  4. Kris Jordan

    Kris Jordan Member

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    Hi Llewelyn,

    No Christian is sinless while on this earth. Why?

    First, even though we have been born again and have received a new godly nature, our old sinful nature is still very much alive and well within us and in constant competition with our new nature.

    Second, God gave us His standard of perfect righteousness in word, deed, thought, motive, action, etc. which is described in the Law (10 Commandments). Sin is anything that falls short of that perfect standard of righteousness and holy perfection.

    The reality is, none of us as believers, even on our best day, live up to that level of perfection every single second of our lives continually. None of us have pure motives every single time. None of us have pure thoughts and desires every single minute. None of us have godly intentions at every turn and if we think we do, we deceive ourselves.

    In the early years of my salvation after Jesus "cleaned up" my more obvious sins like cursing, partying, sexual immorality, etc., I thought I was good to go! I couldn't see any other sins that needed to be dealt with so I never asked God to forgive me for anything because I didn't see anything that needed forgiving. That in itself was pride and self-righteousness on my part but I couldn't see it.

    Then, when God began to peel back the layers of my sinful heart to expose the corruption that still existed inside (like pride, self-righteousness, selfishness, impure motives, etc.), my eyes were opened and He began to humble me and show me how sinful I still was and how much I needed His grace every single day!

    I've been saved for 32 years now and have been in full-time ministry for decades and, even though God has transformed me incredibly from being that "20-year-old clueless girl who didn't realize how sinful she really was," I realize more and more that I still need God's undeserved grace just as much today as I did way back then - not because I desire to sin or habitually sin - but because I know I still do sin and am nowhere near God's standard of perfect holiness at every turn continually.

    The longer I walk with Jesus, the more I understand Paul's humble journey of self-discovery in realizing his own sinful state more and more. Earlier in his walk with Jesus, he called himself, "the least of the apostles." (1 Cor 15:9). Then later on when he was imprisoned for his faith, he called himself, "less than the least of all the saints." (Eph 3:8). And then toward the end of his life, he referred to himself as, "the chief of sinners!" (1 Tim 1:15). Did Paul become more sinful the longer he walked with the Lord? No! Of course not. He just became more humble and more aware of his sinful imperfections before His God who was perfect in every way.

    I think that happens with all of us who have walked with the Lord for many years and it's part of God crucifying our sinful nature (including our pride and self-righteousness) and conforming us into His image more and more before He takes us home.
     
  5. JacksBratt

    JacksBratt Searching for Truth

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    Do you ever eat too much? Gluttony

    Do you ever say "Oh my God" Blasphemy

    Do you ever get angry at other drivers, even in your head? Not treating others as you would treat yourself.

    Do you ever get grumpy with someone?Same as above.

    Do you ever wish you had a nicer car, house, yard, wife, job? Covetousness.

    Do you ever tell even a little lie?

    Do you ever look at a woman, other than your wife and think she is attractive?

    Have you ever took the biggest piece of cake, pie or pizza etc?

    Ya.... we still sin.... Trying to get better... quickly realize when I sin... Ask for forgiveness... but... Still a sinner.

    Christ paid for all my sins, past, present and future.... Doesn't mean I go on as if I have a license.. My heart has changed and I desire to be better but unable to be perfect.
     
  6. tdidymas

    tdidymas Newbie

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    Where many people get confused is failure to distinguish between the spiritual and natural. When the NT says we are free from sin, it is speaking spiritual truth, in which the Holy Spirit powerfully influences us to holy living. In contrast, we are still sinners in the natural, since Paul wrote:
    Rom. 7:25b "So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin." Note he is making distinction between mind and flesh, implying the distinction between spiritual and natural. Just before this, he speaks of the resurrection and victory over death. Afterward, he describes the saved state in the spirit, which is to transform our thinking and make us to conform to Christlikeness. Love is the requirement of the law, and the Spirit motivates us to it (8:4). The point is, we are still in a transition period between justification and glorification, and the reason why we are engaged in spiritual warfare against temptations (1 Cor. 10:13) where he is writing to "beloved brethren."

    So then "with the flesh the law of sin" - that is, the principle of sin still operating in our bodies, since he says (8:10) "And if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin; but the Spirit is life because of righteousness." Since the sin principle continues to operate in our bodies, because the resurrection has not yet happened, "the body is dead" - that is, as good as dead, and will die. Here again he distinguishes between the spiritual and natural realm. And this is the explanation of why we still commit sins, that is, still falling short of God's glory. (Not gross sins of idolatry like witchcraft, greed, whoremongering, and the like).

    So let's get on the same page. When we talk of being sinners, we are talking about still needing to become more Christlike, since we lack some of His qualities. Peter would not have written to believers to increase the virtues of Christ in themselves, if they were already perfect - 2 Pet. 1:1-11. An exhortation to increase in Christlikeness implies we are lacking thereof. In Phil. 3:12-16 Paul writes of the same thing, and says he does not regard himself as having attained to perfection.

    So, think about this one: if walking in the Spirit is about you becoming perfect and sinless, then you're already defeated, because you're already self-centered, vain, and the next step beyond that is self-righteous conceit. We should be focused on Jesus and the needs of others, not on our own "sinless" state. The command to be holy requires faith in Christ and "fixing our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfector of faith." Since God is the only one who can make us conform to His likeness, it is a futile effort for us to try to make ourselves conform. If "by the works of the law no flesh will be justified in His sight," then by our "obedience" thereof we cannot make ourselves holy, either. Walking in the Spirit is a walk of faith. If we focus on ourselves being sinless, we're not walking in the Spirit. Christian Perfection is a self-defeating idea.

    I'm a firm believer that sin is still in us, as 1 John 1:8 states. It continues to challenge us to a faith walk.
    TD:)
     
  7. GraceBro

    GraceBro Member

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    No, I don't believe we will ever achieve sinless perfection. Nor, do I believe that is the goal of the Christian life. I believe this just puts the entire focus on ourselves and our behavior and off of God. However, God sees us as sinless, otherwise, His Spirit could not indwell us forever. Adam sinned in the Garden of Eden and the Holy Spirit, the life of God, left him. Now that we are born again of the Spirit of God through faith in Jesus Christ, there is no sin we can commit that will cause the life of God to leave us because of the finality of the cross. see 2 Corinthians 5:19, Hebrews 10:17-18, Romans 4:8, Colossians 3:13, Ephesians 1:7, Ephesians 4:32
     
  8. Llewelyn Stevenson

    Llewelyn Stevenson Active Member

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    You are all stumbling over my strong objection and failing to address the questions effectively.

    I couldn't care less about the term "sinless perfection", it is unscriptural anyway. I don't know who coined the term but it would have been better if he tied a millstone around his neck and jumped off the deck into the deep blue sea.

    I am tired of the false accusations. I am tired of being told I am a sinner unless I keep sinning [because that's what you're all saying without realising it]. I am tired of being told that I have to sin because I am living in this body. Jesus and his apostles never told me this. Why do I have to sin just to satisfy you?

    I tell you I won't do it. Jesus has set me free from all that and put the Spirit of my Father in me to obey him. I do not lie, I do not steal, I do not covet, I do not lust, and I don't want to; but, according to you, I have to [I think not!]

    Sinlessness is not about perfection, its about maturity.

    I have been and am a dad. I've changed pooey nappies in my day, and its offensive. You do it because you're dad and you love, but it doesn't mean you enjoy it. I have a son who is 38 and one who is 22, I would be extremely unhappy if I was still changing diapers today. My boys are brilliant and they have grown up and I'm happy about that.

    Some here have served Jesus that long but they still want their heavenly Father to forgive their soiled nappies and wash their dirty backsides [1 John 1 vs 9 misapplied].

    Why don't you grow up church?

    I am always dependent on Jesus Christ. There is no salvation without him. I don't have to sin to prove it. I wouldn't even be alive having this discussion with you today if it weren't for him.

    I don't know what TV evangelists I am supposed to be mimicking, I don't watch them.

    I am 59 years old and have served Jesus for more than 50 of those years.

    I'm sorry, I am not as educated as all of you, I barely made school leavers certificate. I was more interested in loving and serving Jesus than an education that served other gods, but this means that I am nothing in your eyes.

    I don't mind this but I know that I can honestly say that I would die for each and every one of you. Jesus taught me this. I would do this even though I know my death would never be vicarious and, to you, a waste of time, but it is my prayer that God would forgive you through Jesus, as he did me, and give you everlasting life.

    If this is pride, I am guilty. If this is sin, I am guilty. And I will gladly pay the price if my Father will show the real Jesus to you. Believe in the true power of his cross, my friend, it really is salvation.
     
  9. tdidymas

    tdidymas Newbie

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    Your statement "I am tired of being told I am a sinner unless I keep sinning [because that's what you're all saying without realising it]" appears to me as a false accusation, as I do not see that idea in any response except yours.

    But what I see in your OP is a very polemic challenge to people of the persuasion that we are still sinners. What was your purpose in posting it? Did you want sincere answers, or did you just want to argue? I've yet to see a valid response to my exegesis of scripture from you.

    It just seems to me that you should take your own advice to "grow up, church." My challenge to you is to respond to my interpretation of scripture and show where you think I'm wrong. I can understand a lack of response if you can't show that, which implies that my interpretation is correct, since it measures up to the context in which those scriptures are written.

    So then, if you think you can scripturally refute what we are saying, then do so. But if you just gripe about it, you show immaturity.
    TD:)
     
  10. D.A. Wright

    D.A. Wright Unworthy Recipient Of Unfathomable Love Supporter

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    For the record, 1 John 1:8 is about the offense of claiming to be without sin, not an edict that overcoming sin is impossible. And don't bother responding with accusation, because I most certainly do not claim to have attained a sinless state. But I understand English well enough to know that there isn't a single verse in the Bible that makes provision for sin--only atonement for it. The admonition to sin not, however, is brimming over in Scripture. I have been taught from my youth that giving any quarter to sin in one's own life is to cultivate its palatability, and to have nothing to do with that.

    For most, the insidious, unconscious Theology of "You must sin as I sin, or you must not sin at all" suffices quite nicely. However misguided the OP's manner or method may be, those who trod comfortably down the path lighted by the hellish torch of Satan, and cadenced by the song of ":guitar:God will,:sax: by some means,:trumpet: clear the guilty,:violin:" will not be pleased to meet with the fruit of their labors and its influence.

    "Keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, and that will by no means clear the guilty; visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children, and on the children's children, to the third and to the fourth generation" "...of them that hate me." (Exodus 34:7), (Exodus 20:5)

    Make no mistake. The conditions of eternal life are the same now as they have ever been:

    Perfect obedience to the commandments of God.

    Were it not so, Christ need not have died.
     
  11. Llewelyn Stevenson

    Llewelyn Stevenson Active Member

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    Since you request a reply to something that missed the mark however, I feel that I have already replied before you posted this.

    Your exegesis is wrong because you do not consider the context of Romans 7 [that is, in conjunction with the beginning of the chapter and chapters 1 to 6 & 8. Let me try to show you.

    In chapter 2 vs 2 he shows very clearly that the condemnation of the sinful will happen without the Law and within. No difference between Jew or Gentile. Ignorance of the Law is no excuse for sin. Romans 3 vs 9 to 23.

    So, if the Law has no case in our final judgement, what use is it in our salvation? After this he establishes his doctrine of justification by faith [with or without knowing the Law] to the end of chapter 3.

    In chapter 4 he then establishes that God justifies the sinner by faith and not by the works of the Law [so that some accused him of saying sin doesn't matter], and in chapter 5 he continues his thesis of salvation by grace through faith.

    In Chapter 6 he begins to absolutely refute the false accusation that he preaches that sin doesn't matter [this case being abundantly clear in all his epistles] and sets up a case that it actually should be impossible for one who is born again to sin with questions like, "How shall we, who are dead to sin, continue in it?" Romans 6:2. And the statement, "Don't you know that whoever you yield yourself to as servants to obey, his servant you are; whether of sin unto death or obedience to righteousness?" [Remember this is with, or without the Law.]

    Now, if you read chapter 6 you will see that he encourages you to

    1. Change the way you see yourself: not alive to sin [so as to be its slave and unable to avoid it], but dead to sin and alive to God [so that you are now able to obey God]

    NOTE: this doctrine that claims you will never stop sinning while in this life denies this truth, yet you continue to expound it.

    2. Live the way you see yourself.

    NOTE: and, indeed, you do, for you still see yourself as the slave of sin.

    Now Paul has and will continue to establish that we can know what sin is by the Law because it was given to reveal it in times of ignorance, but God judged Sodom and Gomorrah; the Canaanites, and the world in Noah's day without the Law for the sins revealed by the Law.

    He begins to use the marriage covenant to describe our relationship to the Old Covenant of the Law, clearly showing that it is broken by the death he spoke of in chapter 6. Chapter 7 vs 1 to 6.

    Now remember Paul's background. He is now speaking of himself as a Jew.

    "For I was without the Law once..." Every child under the age of 12 was considered innocent and without blame, but at the maturing age became responsible and answerable to the Law.

    Do you see? This is personal testimony time and an admonition to avoid being caught up in the works of the Law. It is Paul before salvation and not after. It bears no relationship to our life in Christ.

    Paul is a personal witness and an ardent Pharisee - a law keeper and teacher, yet he admits that it was an impossible relationship, even for him. That is all 7 vs 9 to 23 is telling us and it has no bearing on our struggles today.

    Paul, frustrated with his failures under the Law cries out, "Who can deliver me from this body of death?"

    But he already has the answer: Jesus Christ our Lord, vs 25.

    NOTE: I had hoped that, by raising the question you might see this for yourself, but you ignored the research and continued in your wrong thinking.

    Now Paul knows that we all need to grow in grace and the knowledge of our Lord Jesus and so he continues in chapter 8 explaining how we may experience this freedom from sin, namely, walk after the Spirit and not after the flesh and emphasises if you do indeed yield to the Holy Ghost he will quicken your mortal bodies so that they do not sin 8 vs 11.

    That is the true exegesis of the passage you claim supports your argument.

    You just need to learn the principles of inductive Bible study and stay in the context of what is written.
     
  12. Llewelyn Stevenson

    Llewelyn Stevenson Active Member

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    I am sorry, I don't know Jan Hus. Never heard of him.
     
  13. Llewelyn Stevenson

    Llewelyn Stevenson Active Member

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    I didn't ask for your interpretation of the Scripture, I asked you how you could say Paul was speaking post salvation when he said that post salvation the Law no longer mattered. He claimed to be free from the Law, how do you conclude he still struggled with it?

    You ignored the question, why did you expect a response?
     
  14. Llewelyn Stevenson

    Llewelyn Stevenson Active Member

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    I wanted answers to specific questions that you appear to have purposefully avoided in your response. Where do you think the frustration came from?
     
  15. Llewelyn Stevenson

    Llewelyn Stevenson Active Member

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    Once again you are incorrect, 1 John 1:8 does not state this.

    No one can say that they have no sin because we have all sinned. John is not saying that sin continues to abide in us. This chapter is his gospel message and he clarifies his meaning in this statement with another in 1 John 1:10, then he opens with the statement that he wrote these things so that we sin not and continues to emphasise the same argument Paul puts forward in Romans 6, whoever is born of God cannot sin. Why? Because sin does not abide in them.
     
  16. Charlie24

    Charlie24 Newbie

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    The translators did us no favors when using the word "sin." When John said "If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves..." The Greek refers to "the sin" which is the "sin nature" we are all born with due to the fall of man.

    When John said "whosoever is born of God does not commit sin" is referring to practicing sin. The true born again cannot keep practicing sin without a feeling of guilt and repentance.

    Paul admitted in Phil. 3:12-13 he had not reached the point of no sin, but was pressing onward awaiting the resurrection when he would reach that point in Christ.

    If Paul couldn't reach that point, I'm pretty sure none of us will.
     
  17. tdidymas

    tdidymas Newbie

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    Firstly, I did answer the OP in my response, if you would have carefully read it, but you seem to read with extreme prejudice by your responses. In addition, your responses like the final statement above is offensive and full of the kind of judgment that Jesus commanded not to do. In contrast, in my rebuke to you above, I was trying to address that attitude.

    It seems like you have knowledge of scripture in this response here, but I would like to point out some mistakes I think you are making. One of them has to do with recognizing the difference between sinful acts and the sinful nature in the scripture.

    For example, when John wrote "if we say we have no sin..." he is talking about the sin principle that continues to operate in us while we still live on earth in the flesh. He is not talking about the practice of sin. And when he says "the one born of God cannot sin..." he is talking about the practice of sin in this case. What we can conclude from this is that the Christian life is not sinless, but of constant and ongoing repentance from sin. The idea is to be going the right direction, that is, toward God, holiness, and godly living. It has to be this way, since loyalty, perseverance, and endurance of faith is part of the character of Christ that God is developing in us.

    Further, Paul's dissertation in Romans 6-8 is about believing what God is doing in our life. It's not about making ourselves sinless. It's about believing what God is doing. When Paul says "it's not I but the sin in me..." he is talking about the sin principle. When he says "how shall we who have died to sin..." he is talking about "dying" to the practice of sin. Yes, Christ will deliver us finally from the sinful nature at the resurrection, and so we must conclude that our ongoing and constant repentance from sin in this life is about believing in the sanctifying work of the Spirit, which is not instantaneous in this transitional life we are now living.

    And to claim that I see myself as being a slave to sin is a false and exaggerative statement. Yet more evidence of your prejudicial judgment, which shows that you aren't as sinless as you claim to be.
    TD:)
     
  18. tdidymas

    tdidymas Newbie

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    I'm confused by your response here, since you earlier say that Paul condemned those who said the law no longer mattered, but here you seem to be saying that the law actually does no longer matter ("post salvation"). Not sure your meaning or what your point is.

    Paul never said that post salvation the law no longer matters. We do conclude that ceremonial and dietary laws don't matter in regard to salvation, since Christ fulfilled completely the atoning sacrifice, so that part of it having to do with rituals and ceremonies no longer matters, either pre- or post-salvation for individuals today. With that I agree. Also, the dietary part of the law no longer matters in the same way, since Jesus declared all foods clean.

    Yet in regard to the moral part of the law, Paul never says it doesn't matter, either pre- or post-salvation. In Rom. 3:8 he condemns those who claim the law doesn't matter by their obvious exaggerative conclusion to the grace message: "let us do evil that good may come." And it doesn't matter whether such a person is antinomian or a legalist, such a conclusion incurs condemnation, because they are not understanding the gospel message.

    He also says in 3:31 that the law is established through faith, not nullified. This law he is speaking of is, of course, the moral/ethical law of God. Paul says in 8:4 that we who have the Spirit, who walk in the Spirit, have the requirements of the law expressed in us (expressed by the God kind of love, since that love fulfills the moral/ethical law). So I don't know where you get off by saying that Paul says the law doesn't matter post-salvation. Is this what you're saying?

    When Paul says he is free from the law, he is not talking about the law not mattering post-salvation. He is saying that his conscience is freed from the guilt of the law, such that he can confidently come before God, knowing he is accepted (because of what Christ did). And this is really the only way to loving God with all our heart.

    And your last statement "He claimed to be free from the Law, how do you conclude he still struggled with it?" is also coming to a false conclusion. Paul wrote "through the law comes the knowledge of sin." So he wasn't struggling with the law, but he was with sin. He was in agreement with the law, but it was the sin in him that he continued to struggle against. If he had no struggle post-salvation, then he would not have had the experience, and thus the doctrine he taught the Galatians: "the Spirit lusts against the flesh, and the flesh against the Spirit, so that you cannot do what you want." That is, you can't gratify fleshly desires and expect God to give you warm fuzzies.

    Finally, when you ask a question to someone, you're expecting an interpretation from them, unless you just want them to quote a verse of the Bible without any explanation. Your explanations of what you think the Bible means by what it says is an interpretation. All commentaries are interpretations of scripture. I'm just hoping that you don't think of the term "interpretation" as something evil. But I also hope that my explanation here is sufficient to answer the question.
    TD:)
     
  19. tdidymas

    tdidymas Newbie

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    I get that you are frustrated, but I'm hoping that you exhibit the patience toward people who answer the questions in their own way, perhaps not in the way you want them.
    TD:)
     
  20. Bible Highlighter

    Bible Highlighter Law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul. Supporter

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    You are not alone. I am a fellow Trinitarian Sola Scriptura Christian who believes similar to you. I believe Christians have to overcome grievous sin (like lying, lusting, hating, stealing, etc.) as a part of eternal life (after we are saved by God's grace through faith in Christ. We not only need Justification (God's grace through faith in Jesus and seeking forgiveness with Him), but we also need Sanctification (i.e. the working of God within us to live a holy life). All of these are the works of God done in a believer's life (under their free will cooperation with the Lord).

    Here are the 5 things (as a whole) in Scripture that your average

    Christian does not understand when they read Paul:

    #1. The Bible teaches that there is a change of the Law (Hebrews 7:12); So when Paul talks about the "Law" (generically), he is referring to the Torah, i.e. the Old Law (or the many laws given to Moses and Israel) and not the commandments given to us by Jesus Christ and His followers (i.e. the New Law or New Testament Law). All one has to do is look at the context to see that Paul was referring to the "Old Law" when he spoke generically of the "law."

    #2. Paul was fighting against "Circumcision Salvationism" (Which is Law Alone Salvationism without God's grace); A certain sect of Jews were trying to deceive some Christians into thinking they had to first be circumcised in order to be saved. This was a heresy that was clearly addressed at the Jerusalem council (See Acts of the Apostles 15:1, Acts of the Apostles 15:5, Acts of the Apostles 15:24). Paul also addressed this problem; Paul said to the Galatians that if you seek to be circumcised, Christ will profit you nothing (Galatians 5:2), and then Paul mentions how if you seek to be justified by the Law, you have fallen from grace (Galatians 5:4). This "law" is the Torah because circumcision is not a part of the commands given to us by Jesus and His followers.

    #3. An Understanding on the Pharisee's false beliefs according to the Bible:

    A. Christian Belief Alone Proponents (or those who think they can abide in some kind of sin on some level and still be saved) do not understand that the Pharisees sometimes ignored God's grace like in the Parable of the Tax Collector and the Pharisee (Luke 18:9-14) and this was not at the expense of failing to uphold basic morality. For in this parable, the problem of the Pharisee is that he was not crying out to God for forgiveness of his sins like the tax collector was doing. So the Pharisee needed to get his heart right with God first. In short, the Pharisee was making salvation all about works with no emphasis on God's grace as the entrance gate and foundation of his faith. Hence, why Paul fought against "Works Alone Salvationism" without God's grace. But what they fail to realize is that Jesus was not endorsing the tax collector to continue in his sin the rest of his life by merely paying lip service because Jesus also told two people to "sin no more" (See John 5:14, and John 8:11).

    B. Some (not all) Christian Belief Alone Proponents (or those who believe they can abide in sin on some level and still be saved) think that the Pharisees kept the letter of the Law or they kept the Law perfectly and this was their problem. They say that the Pharisees kept the letter of the Law but not the spirit of the Law. However, these kinds of statements are not true. For Jesus said that the problem of the Pharisees was that they ignored the weightier matters of the Law like love, faith, justice, and mercy (See Matthew 23:23, Luke 11:42). So Jesus had a problem with the Pharisees not keeping the Law; And Paul says if any man does not agree with the words of Jesus Christ, and the doctrine according to godliness, they are proud and they know nothing (1 Timothy 6:3-4). James 4:6 says God resists the proud, and gives grace to the humble.​

    #4. The Bible teaches that sin can separate us from God from Matthew to Revelation (Matthew 5:28-30) (Matthew 6:15) (Matthew 12:37) (Matthew 25:31-46) (Luke 9:62) (1 John 3:15) (Galatians 5:19-21) (Revelation 21:8).

    #5. The Bible teaches that obedience to God's commands is tied to eternal life from Matthew to Revelation (See Matthew 19:17-19) (Luke 10:25-28) (1 John 1:7) (1 John 3:23) (Hebrews 5:9) (Revelation 22:14).
     
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