1. Welcome to Christian Forums, a friendly forum to discuss Christianity in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to be able to join in fellowship with Christians all over the world.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon and God Bless!

Women and being ordained or a nun

Discussion in 'Full and Part Time Ministry' started by kimberlyw, Feb 17, 2017.

  1. kimberlyw

    kimberlyw New Member

    29
    +18
    Christian
    Private
    I'm considering being a nun or becoming ordained. I know I'm called to full time Christian ministry for some time but the Bible seems to frown on Women Ministers. I never want to go against the will of God but becoming a nun takes like three years. Any advice on such things? Thanks. Biblical necessary.
     
  2. rockytopva

    rockytopva Love to pray! :) Supporter

    +2,550
    Pentecostal
    Single
    And the next day we that were of Paul's company departed, and came unto Caesarea: and we entered into the house of Philip the evangelist, which was one of the seven; and abode with him. And the same man had four daughters, virgins, which did prophesy. - Acts 21_8-9
     
  3. Resha Caner

    Resha Caner Expert Fool

    +293
    Lutheran
    Married
    Why is 3 years too long for you? And in what church is it easier to become a minister than a nun?

    I'm wondering what your background is. I'm Lutheran, which includes an entire theology regarding the idea of vocation such that everyone is serving God, not just ordained ministers. So, what exactly do you think you have been called to do?
     
  4. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

    +9,884
    Anglican
    Married
    The two are quite different, so I'd think that deciding for sure which way you ought to go would be the first thing to get settled. And also, the question of which way to go depends to some degree on what denomination/church you belong to or attend. It might be necessary to change churches in order to make everything work.
     
  5. Jason0047

    Jason0047 Agent for Christ

    +1,148
    Non-Denominational
    Married
    You can just study the Word of God in your own time where you live. Ask God to show you what His Word says. Pray over it and read it. There is no need to go to a church or a school. We are study to show ourselves approved unto God (2 Timothy 2:15). You can have a blog (as you suggested elsewhere). You can dedicate your blog in being for the woman of faith.


    ...
     
  6. kimberlyw

    kimberlyw New Member

    29
    +18
    Christian
    Private
    You all make sound points. Thank you. You're right, maybe I feel three yrs is too long as I rush things, idk. Religion wise I'm sad it seems only Catholics have nuns as I'm more Protestant... I wish Baptists had nuneries. Eunich seems only answer. Thanks for the Bible verses as well!
     
  7. rockytopva

    rockytopva Love to pray! :) Supporter

    +2,550
    Pentecostal
    Single
     
  8. rockytopva

    rockytopva Love to pray! :) Supporter

    +2,550
    Pentecostal
    Single
    I would think, after reading your posts, that if you were to pick up the calling, that calling would be something uniquely you.
     
  9. Ken Behrens

    Ken Behrens Well-Known Member

    +397
    Non-Denominational
    Married
    From seeing some of your other posts, you already have a ministry. So that part of the issue is moot. Why not just follow the gifts God has given you, and don't worry about what the rest of the world calls it? God has opened doors for me for almost 50 years, with no title, and an assortment of gifts that seems to fit nowhere but everywhere.

    There is a danger in becoming a nun/pastor, etc, and that is that expectations will be placed on you as to what your ministry should entail. Plus the way the Body of Christ is arranged, if you minister in one denomination, you will not be welcome in some others. My first wife turned down ordination 5 times for this very reason. Though today, if you are in the US, there are places you can get ordained without such expectations. Good places, that will offer training, mentoring, and connection without specifying what you must do to serve God.

    Forget about the woman thing. That's God's problem to fix the men and their ideas. It's a big world with lots of Kingdom needs.
     
  10. kimberlyw

    kimberlyw New Member

    29
    +18
    Christian
    Private
    Thank you! Well said last three posts and can rocky top give me a link to the YouTube so I can share? Thanks for the insights on your wife Ken. Good things to think and pray about. God willing I'd like His ministry to grow, for Jesus Revival. The YouTube was perfect and is what my heart feels, burdened for.
     
  11. Resha Caner

    Resha Caner Expert Fool

    +293
    Lutheran
    Married
    I'm not sure what you think a nun is. Apart from taking a vow of celibacy, the Lutheran church has called female workers. They are called a "deaconess". We also have teachers and social service workers.

    Is it the idea of a nunnery that intrigues you? That often doesn't mean serving the world but trying to escape from it. If it's just the idea of living in a faith community that appeals to you, again there are Protestant versions called "covenant" communities. I think you need to do some research - specifically you need to find a female mentor.
     
  12. Strong in Him

    Strong in Him I can do all things through Christ Supporter

    +2,733
    Christian
    Married
    Well, for what it's worth;
    1. It is very debatable whether the Bible is "against" women ministers. There have been, and are, several debates/arguments about it on this site alone.
    2. Being a Minister of a church - maybe even a large one - and being a nun, are two very different things.
    3. Both vocations may require 3 years training; whether in a convent, or theological college. For some denominations it may be more, and if the church think you are too young and don't have much life experience, they may send you off to get anther job first/recommend you volunteer somewhere with people.
    If 3 years training is too much for you, then maybe you need to ask yourself how committed you are. Sorry, don't mean to sound harsh, but Jesus waited for 18 years before he began his ministry (he seemed to know who he was at the age of 12). The disciples had 3 years training with Jesus, and then had to wait 50 days until Pentecost and been filled with the Spirit. Peter says that we need to know our faith to be able to answer for the hope that is in us, 1 Peter 3:15; 2 Peter 1:10. And Paul says that we should study so that we know how to correctly handle the word of God, 2 Timothy 2:15. Ministers need to be trained in theology, Biblical exegesis, maybe language studies, preaching, and so on, so that they can preach the word, teach Bible classes, prepare young people for confirmation/baptism and so on.
    4. Being ordained, or a nun, are not the only kinds of Christian Ministry. I believe, in fact, that whatever a Christian does - teaching, medicine, plumbing, cleaning - is their Christian ministry. We are using the gifts that God has given us and are serving him. We are his children, with his Spirit living in us, and are his witnesses, Acts 1:8, and his ambassadors, 2 Corinthians 5:20, wherever we go. You are a full time Christian, servant of and witness for the Lord wherever you go - you just need to find out where it is that he wants you.
    Personally, I am not employed at the moment. I am a lay preacher on Sundays and I do voluntary work in the week; that is my ministry. Even if I just spend time travelling round on buses, shopping or whatever; making contact with people who may be lonely and talk to no one else that day, smiling at people who may be stressed/unhappy is a ministry; and who knows what conversations will come out of that? The world wouldn't see it like that - it's not big or important. Maybe even some people in the church would dismiss that as being nothing - but who cares what they think? Ministry is not always big or up front. Praying for other people and being willing to listen, is a ministry - and that can be done even if you are confined to the house.
     
  13. Greg J.

    Greg J. Well-Known Member Supporter

    +1,140
    Christian
    Single
    I believe the majority of people in full-time ministry are untrained and unaccredited. Prayerfully consider what value training and accreditation would give to what God wants you to do. He's not calling you into ministry apart from loving and serve him. The training comes when God wants it for you or through you to others in the future (which only he knows).
     
  14. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

    +9,884
    Anglican
    Married
    I can't imagine how this could be true, but I'm open to hearing it if anyone has any statistics.
     
  15. Paidiske

    Paidiske Bodily member Staff Member Red Team - Moderator Supporter

    +3,491
    Anglican
    Married
    I'm a priest, so if you have specific questions about being a woman in parish ministry I'm happy to answer them. Being a Baptist pastor would be a bit different, but we'd have a very great deal in common.

    For what it's worth, my training took me six years; would have been four but my daughter was born while I was at college, so that slowed me down a bit!

    I'm going to go against the grain a bit and say that I don't think some study or training is ever wasted. Even if you don't go into ordained ministry, having learned more about the Bible, about Christian thought and history, about worship and ethics and pastoral care... if you're making yourself available to God, you better believe he'll use whatever training you've had!

    Anglicans have nuns. If you're really interested you could arrange to visit a convent. I have one near me and it's really important to me as a place of prayer and retreat.
     
  16. Ken Behrens

    Ken Behrens Well-Known Member

    +397
    Non-Denominational
    Married
    It depends what you mean by "training". Compared to seminary standards, most clergy in America are untrained. Two years of Bible College may or may not not measure up to 6 years of seminary, depending what you look for. And many have only self-study.

    Accreditation is another matter. In America, very few religious training schools are accredited in the sense of the university (for which we have a network of 10 regional accrediting bodies, whose standards are as high as any country in the world). The religious schools have their own accrediting body, but even then, many do not seek even that accreditation.

    The laws in America allow any church to ordain. They also allow any organization an easy path to becoming legally a "church". It's about $800 and a 25 page form, which is mostly checking yes. It's called a 501C3 if you care to look it up.

    I can't speak to the country, but my city has a population of 10,000, 62 churches. I think 20 trained clergy in the sense of seminary or equivalent staff 10 of these, another 30 or so in the sense of trained in a college with Christian-only accreditation (Bible school), staffing about 30 of these. Probably another 30 "untrained" in any sense, other than by experience.

    The big school in the area "training" many of the pastors, is not accredited. It is a branch of a national institution of "schools". The lessons, culminating in a masters degree, require 4 years of one Saturday per month, and prepare the candidates roughly equal to the level I had after four years of Catholic high school. The candidates are then ordained by the school.
     
  17. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

    +9,884
    Anglican
    Married
    Very well, I'd consider two years of religious studies in a Bible college to be "training." As for self-study, I know that there are such persons acting as ministers and pastors, but I seriously doubt that they are "most" American clergy. If statistics or evidence showed me the opposite, of course I'd pay attention.

    It might be, but I wasn't making any distinction there.