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So I was dead wrong about my genealogy all this time, woah....

Discussion in 'History & Genealogy' started by JacquelineDeane55, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. JacquelineDeane55

    JacquelineDeane55 Newbie

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    All this time I thought I was part native American on my dad's side of the family, but my little sister had a DNA test performed on her and we all found out that our ancestors were mostly from England! So we are actually English!

    Boy, was I mistaken to think I was Native American! I am actuality less than 4% of that! What a find!

    My Grandmother used to tell me that Queen Mary of Scots was one of my ancestors, but that is probably impossible, since she was Scottish, and I am mostly English. The Scottish blood is just not there. I am actually less than 4% Scottish.

    I might be descended from English royalty, but I will have to do more research to actually determine that.

    DNA tests don't lie.

    I am proud to be 92% English, 4% Scottish, and 4% Native American. Guess that means I am a cross-breed, but who in today's modern world is not, you know?
     
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  2. A Realist

    A Realist Living in Reality

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    Mary, Queen of Scots had plenty of English blood. She was the daughter of Margaret Tudor, who was the daughter of Henry VII of England and sister of Henry VIII.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2019
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  3. PloverWing

    PloverWing Episcopalian

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    I don't think that's inconsistent. American descendants of immigrants from the British Isles, especially those who settled on the American frontier, sometimes married Native American spouses (or partnered with them without marrying). That happened in my family, and (we think) in my husband's family. That could result in DNA numbers like you're seeing.
     
  4. Ahermit

    Ahermit Active Member

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    Our body is not who we are. We have a body, but we are not the body. Similarly, we may have a car, but we are not the car.

    Which is more important, the car or the driver. It is only a worldly matter for a person to invest in a car to exploit self-worth. Similarly, why exploit what is dead (perishable) for what is alive (imperishable). To believe in the perishable, instead of the imperishable, is a sure way to become perishable.

    Our body is our means for expressing the truth, love and faith of God/Jesus Christ, in this world. Our body was born in this world (the visible perishable realm); our spirit was born not of this world (the invisible imperishable realm).
     
  5. Jonaitis

    Jonaitis Pilgrim

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    Hold on! You may still be Native American, it may just be that you didn't inherit that much from your father.

    We receive 50% of our DNA from each parent, who is 100% of what they have. We do not know (until you take the test) what we take after within that percent range. If you father is 54% Native American and 46% English, it is possible that you only receive all of the English and only 4% of the Native American. This is why it is good to test more relatives, especially parents and grandparents. I mean look at your current results, if it were even you wouldn't have such odd percentages.
     
  6. A_Thinker

    A_Thinker Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Native American heritage can be hard to affirm in these tests.

    From ... DNA Tests Are Not An Indicator of Native Identity

    "DNA tests are not accurate indicators of Indigenous identity and heritage. While many types of DNA tests utilize probabilities of hereditary markers, none of these are accurate enough to determine region, tribe, or a family or individual in a person’s genealogy. As well, companies conducting DNA tests have difficulty in determining Native identity due to a lack of information on the genetics of Native people."
     
  7. kittysbecute

    kittysbecute Pokémon Master

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    DNA tests are not precisely accurate when it comes to percentages. One example - I am a quarter Portuguese and the DNA estimate I received earlier this year said 7%; they updated it yesterday and said 11%. Which is definitely getting closer. But it is still off. If I click on more info though it says that 11% actually means a range from 0% to 34%. Which is true because 25% falls into that range. The estimates are not precise.
    I went into taking the test knowing of its inaccuracy but when I showed my results to my parents for fun, my parent who is 50% Portuguese was annoyed at how off the Portuguese estimate was. Which kind of made me annoyed later too.
    I think the value of the test is more in finding other living relatives (and finding out what they know) or in finding other possible clues to help in genealogy research.

    That said - you might be more or less Native American than what the estimate says. You might be able to find out more through genealogy research. Same with finding out if you are related to Mary Queen of Scots.
     
  8. JackRT

    JackRT Flat earther waking up ... Supporter

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    Actually your genetic inheritance will be half of your father's and half of your mothers. So, in this case you would be 27% Native American and 23% English. Both of those percentages could be larger if your mother had Native American and/or English heritage as well.
     
  9. Jonaitis

    Jonaitis Pilgrim

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    You misread my post.

    If his father is a little above half Native American and a little under half English, then he may still paternally inherit almost of all the English and almost nothing of Native American. We don't know what the mother has.
     
  10. JackRT

    JackRT Flat earther waking up ... Supporter

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    I think that you may need to brush up on your genetics.
     
  11. Jonaitis

    Jonaitis Pilgrim

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    My information is taken from Ancestry.com. A lot of people think that you must inherit every ethnicity estimate from both parents, but that isn't true. Here is one of their articles on it: Unexpected Results. You can only inherit 50% from each parent, but you don't know what you will take after within that range. If your mother is a variety of things, you will inherit a random 50% of her DNA. If she is 40% English, there is a chance you may not inherit that at all.

    If you think this is wrong, talk to them, not me. I'm just a guy who passes on information from those who know more than me.
     
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