Dom Pérignon: The Legend of the French Monk Attributed to Inventing Champagne

Michie

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Did a Benedictine monk invent champagne?

In addition to prosecco, champagne is very popular when there is an air of celebration.

In particular, there are some French bubbles which, despite having become the reflection of a very expensive tradition, have truly humble origins.

According to legend, this champagne was invented thanks to Benedictine monk Dom Pierre Pérignon. The monk, born in 1638 in Sainte-Menehould, France, learned about wine as a child while his father worked in the vineyards.

In 1656, he was welcomed into the abbey of Saint-Pierre d'Hautvillers, where he was ordained a priest at the age of 30. There he remained until he died in 1715.

Among the monastery's activities was the production and sale of wine, and Dom Pierre was given responsibility for the cellars. And this is where the birth of champagne has two versions.

The first refers to an error. During the preparation of white wine, some bottles exploded, which made the monk realize he could make sparkling wine.

Continued below.