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1st Open communion within Anglicanism & 2nd...

Discussion in 'Scripture,Tradition,Reason-Anglican & Old Catholic' started by Tigger45, Jan 15, 2020.

  1. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +17,290
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    I don't know that I could be prosecuted, but the grandmother could have had the child removed from her care for breaching the conditions of the fostering arrangement.
     
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  2. PloverWing

    PloverWing Episcopalian

    +3,829
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    The practice I've seen in the Episcopal church in the US is children receiving Communion as soon as they're old enough to manage the physical act of eating a wafer -- so toddlers at age 1 or 2 or so. Children are considered members of the church at their baptism, which most often happens in infancy.

    Theologically, we'd be okay with the Orthodox practice of using a spoon to give Communion to infants, but I haven't seen it done in practice.
     
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  3. The Liturgist

    The Liturgist Traditional Liturgical Christian Supporter

    +3,506
    United States
    Generic Orthodox Christian
    Celibate
    Indeed, I don’t know what kind of conditions those would be; in the US however I have never heard of a prohibition on religious initiation as part of a fostering agreement, and I am reasonably certain that as long as the child desired baptism and was not the victim of any kind of abuse (psychological, physical, or God forbid, indecent assault, as happened in Germany to foster children in the 1960s through 2000s on a massive scale), it would not be an issue, because of the extreme power of the First Amendment (which is not all good; for example, there are no laws and can be no laws prohibiting holocaust denial).
     
  4. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +17,290
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Fostering arrangements are very tightly controlled here. I have seen this up closer than I would like, as my own parents foster three of my brother's children. For example, my parents have no power to change the school the children go to, to make various decisions on their behalf without recourse to the department of human services, and so on. They are in fact not allowed to bring the children to visit me without special permission, because I live just across a state border. Last time we met they drove most of the way, and I crossed the border to share a meal with them.

    Since something like baptism would be considered a very significant life decision, in general foster parents would be discouraged/disallowed from making it without the consent of parents and/or the department which has oversight of the foster placement.
     
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  5. Thatgirloncfforums

    Thatgirloncfforums Well-Known Member

    +719
    United States
    Generic Orthodox Christian
    Private
    What are the reasons for such tight control?
     
  6. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +17,290
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    To be honest, I'm not sure. I would guess a combination of managing the risk of abuse, but also wanting to allow children to maintain their own identity, family traditions and culture. I would guess that the stolen generations phenomenon is a big part of the background as to why things are now the way they are.
     
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  7. Arcangl86

    Arcangl86 Newbie

    +5,791
    Anglican
    Single
    US-Green
    In the Episcopal Church paedocommunion is allowed. I think it's a fairly new thing though, only allowed since the 80s, which is also when the requirement to be confirmed before taking on church leadership was dropped. (the only exception is ordination). Practice wise though, it's going to vastly depend. I've seen both paedocommunion and waiting until a certain age, though IME that tends to happen more in communities of color and immigrant communities.
     
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  8. Deegie

    Deegie Priest of the Church Supporter

    250
    +135
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    US-Democrat
    The above matches my experience and opinion of TEC as well. I encourage parents to at least consider having their infants receive Communion on the day of their baptism but I have yet to have any accept.
     
  9. seeking.IAM

    seeking.IAM Episcopalian Supporter

    +4,221
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    That is interesting. Confirmation is required to be in leadership in my parish (as well as having made a pledge to be on the Vestry). I take it that must be local practice, not church wide?
     
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  10. Deegie

    Deegie Priest of the Church Supporter

    250
    +135
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    US-Democrat
    You're in TEC, correct? I don't believe the national canons specify the qualifications for Vestry and other leadership positions. My diocese simply requires that they be communicants in good standing.
     
  11. seeking.IAM

    seeking.IAM Episcopalian Supporter

    +4,221
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    Yes, I'm TEC. I am fairly certain the pledging requirement for Vestry members is strictly Rector-driven. I am unsure who is making the call about confirmation for leadership positions.
     
  12. MarkRohfrietsch

    MarkRohfrietsch Unapologetic Apologist Supporter

    +4,610
    Canada
    Lutheran
    Married
    The BCP reflects the position of Confessional Lutheranism; that being said, in our parish, it is up to Pastor's discretion, on a case by case basis. Pastor will bless, but not commune anyone who approaches the altar who he has not spoken too prior to service or who he does not know. While we have a statement regarding our communion practice, when it is denied, he makes a point of speaking to the person(s) following the service (we get new members as a result sometimes).

    The ACC Priest is in error IMO, but I have heard of Anglican Parishes here in Ontario doing the same, but rather than ACC parishes, it is a handful of pietist, legalistic low-Church parishes, and they restrict it to members of their parish only. The lack of universal practice within a Church body can be baffling.
     
  13. MarkRohfrietsch

    MarkRohfrietsch Unapologetic Apologist Supporter

    +4,610
    Canada
    Lutheran
    Married
    In this day and age; human rights.

    Before we were confirmed, we were instructed in a simple form of "emergency" baptism; today, while first aid is covered under the good samaritan act; you baptise someone with good intentions who did not want it, you are in the deepest of social justice do-do.
     
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  14. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +17,290
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Well, to be fair, if we believe baptism is actually effective (ie. does something to the person receiving it) then imposing it on others against their will is a pretty awful thing to do. It does get tricky when we're talking about people young enough that their parents/guardians make decisions for them.
     
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