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the word "Christian" as an adjective in other languages

Discussion in 'Languages' started by Red Gold, Jul 29, 2021.

  1. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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    the word "Christian" as an adjective in other languages

    in German it is like this:


    noun, male: 1 Christ, 2 Christen
    noun, female: 1 Christin, 2 Christinnen

    adjective: christlich - with a small c
     
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  2. Occams Barber

    Occams Barber Newbie Supporter

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    There is no clear rule on whether '(C)(c)hristian should be capitalised when used as an adjective in English.

    There is a similar confusion with other religious adjectives although the tendency is to capitalise.

    The rule I apply is to capitalise when in doubt as a token of respect for the views of others. There is a similar issue when discussing God (Christian) versus god (generic).

    OB
     
  3. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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    OK - and what about other languages now?

    What is Christian or christian as an adjectiv in other languages?
    Maybe I will ask Google for it. :)
     
  4. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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  5. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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  6. Occams Barber

    Occams Barber Newbie Supporter

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    Be cautious of over simplifying. Capital Letters can be used for a range of practical, social and cultural reasons. (are German nouns still capitalised?). There is no reason to assume that the French or Swedish or English see capitalisation in the same way.

    In 19th century English publications capitalisation was often used for emphasis on signage etc. I will occasionally used capitals as an ironic device introducing an inappropriate formality as a form of subtle humour. Look at modern headlines as an indication of the Range of Uses for Capitalisation.


    My sense is while there may be some formal rules around capitalisation the real usage is informal and used for effect. I also suspect that non-European languages would see caps (where they exist) in a different cultural light.

    OB


    Letter case - Wikipedia
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2021
  7. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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    Sorry - my topic is not about capital letters at all.
    :)
     
  8. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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    What about other translations for the German word "christlich"?
     
  9. Occams Barber

    Occams Barber Newbie Supporter

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    Sorry @Red Gold. When I saw you earlier differentiating between (C) and (c) 'Christianity' I wrongly assumed your issue was capitalisation rather than the use of christian as an adjective.

    OB
     
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  10. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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    that was just an un-important side remark.
     
  11. ChristianForCats

    ChristianForCats Bible Reader

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    Christian capitalized is a proper noun. If you write christian lowercase, I will always take offense to that - even if it is obviously a typo.

    As an adjective, it is "I am a Christian woman." a capital C is required.

    Now when looking at the word Christian around the world, how will anyone know whhat the context is for a proper noun that is sometimes used as an adjective?
     
  12. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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    That's the way I see it as well.
     
  13. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

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    Everyone who speaks that language will know.
     
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