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Homily of the Day: Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ

Discussion in 'One Bread, One Body - Catholic' started by Michie, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    Homily of the Day

    June 10th, 2012

    First Reading: Ex 24:3-8
    Psalm: Ps 116:12-13, 15-16, 17-18
    Second Reading: Heb 9:11-15
    Gospel: Mk 14:12-16, 22-26

    Perhaps children find it difficult to get their heads around this Feast of the Body and Blood of Christ. A boy of three was intrigued by the Communion rite and watched every move of the priest until he finished wiping the chalice and ciboria at the end of the Mass. Then the boy turned to his mother and said, “Mom, the priest has finished doing the dishes. Can we go home now?”

    Today’s feast may also cause many adults to scratch their heads wondering what it is all about. When this feast was originally presented to us it had a twofold intention. First, it was intended to focus on the Real Presence of Jesus in the Eucharist. Second, it was to focus on the Real Presence of Jesus in the world. As we trace the history of Eucharistic devotion we can see that we became over focused on devotion to the Real Presence in the Blessed Sacrament. It is only in recent history that we have begun to move away from this lopsided devotion, to move away from a purely individualistic Eucharistic piety to a heal their communitarian understanding of Eucharist, to move away from unquestioned mystery to a fuller understanding of this sacrament.

    In the early Church for several centuries before we got distracted by individual preoccupation with the Real Presence in the Blessed Sacrament, Christians understood that the Real Presence was in the People of God, in their brothers and sisters. It was for this reason that St. Paul urged the early Christians to leave behind their former way of life and enter into an entirely new kind of life. They did this and their new life went against the culture of the time. It meant sharing material goods and the subtle riches of faith, hope and charity. This lasted up until about the fourth century, when there was a change toward individual private piety and the magical focus on the actions and words of the Mass.

    After Vatican II, the Church in her teaching has been leading Catholics back to St. Paul’s ideal of what the Church should be. We recognize that the Eucharist is not just about the transforming of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ. It is also about the transforming of the world about us, into the Mystical Body of Christ. We must not forget that the Exodus was a slave revolt by marginalized people who had been driven into servitude under great oppression. The Feast of the Passover with unleavened bread was instituted to commemorate this event of a new beginning for the Israelites. We must not forget that the unleavened bread of the Eucharist is a powerful sign of the poor man’s food and our breaking and sharing it is a call to us to be on the side of the poor. This Eucharistic gathering is a mirror held up to the world, a prototype of the solidarity, compassion and common effort that is intended in God’s call to be a person for others. Just as God was involved in a conscience-raising campaign with the Israelite people, so too must we raise the issues of injustice and prejudice in our own community. Just as God is on the side of the poor and oppressed, so too must we be on their side. Full communion with God and others is incompatible with any sort of injustice or exploitation. So, having received the Body and Blood of Christ during the Mass, we should leave the Mass to bring about the transformation of the world we live in.

    There is an inextricable link between what we celebrate during mass and social justice. Many of us when we think of the Body and Blood of Christ we think only of the consecrated bread and wine. And on one level, our thinking is true. If, however, our experience stops with this understanding and goes no further, then we miss something that is most significant, the need to love our neighbor. It is true, as that the consecrated bread and wine are the Body and Blood of Jesus but equally important so are we and our neighbor.
     
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  2. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    Corpus Christi: Our Debt to St. Thomas Aquinas
    St. Thomas Aquinas, saint and doctor of the Catholic Church, is perhaps best known for his scholarship and as patron saint of students and universities. His great works, the two Summas (Summa Theologica and Summa Contra Gentiles) are mainstays of…
     
  3. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    Corpus Christi: Our Debt to St. Thomas Aquinas
    St. Thomas Aquinas, saint and doctor of the Catholic Church, is perhaps best known for his scholarship and as patron saint of students and universities. His great works, the two Summas (Summa Theologica and Summa Contra Gentiles) are mainstays of…
     
  4. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    A Feast Day for the Eucharist
    The Catholic Church teaches that in the Eucharist, the communion wafer and the altar wine are transformed and really become the body and blood of Jesus Christ. Have you ever met anyone who has found this Catholic doctrine to be…
     
  5. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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  6. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    Top 10 Eucharistic movie moments...
    Over at the National Catholic Register, my wife, April and I run down our “Top 10 Eucharistic Movie Moments” just in time for Corpus Christi. Here’s the list, updated from what we filed two weeks ago. Add further suggestions in the comments.
     
  7. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    Viva Cristo Rey! The Happy Priest Reflects on the Solemnity of Corpus Christi

    [​IMG]

    Most of the time, we need constant reminders of the immense gifts that God continually bestows upon us. The Eucharist is an immense miracle, but sometimes we need to be reminded just how amazing this miracle really is.As we celebrate the Solemnity of Corpus Christi and call to mind the amazing example of Blessed José Luís Sanchez del Río, how can anyone purposely miss Mass on Sunday, receive communion in the state of mortal sin, or not go to Confession on a regular basis and whenever necessary? Viva Cristo Rey!
    Full Story
     
  8. Fantine

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    I really enjoyed the Mass last night. I played "In Remembrance of Me" at Communion, which I like not only for the arpeggios and dynamic changes but also because it is a Eucharistic song that involves a commissioning--"Do this in remembrance of me--be the Eucharist for one another."

    And I looked out at the congregation, most of whom I know quite well, and thought of their sorrows, their aches and pains, their challenges. Then I focused on a number of them, one at a time, and prayed for their healing and sent healing thoughts their way. I felt like Santa Claus...

    I then realized the times that people had prayed for me and my family through our difficulties and strife. So altogether it was a very beautiful and prayerful experience.
     
  9. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    Unless! A homily on the Solemnity of Corpus Christi...
    This Sunday in many places features the (moved) Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ, Our Lord. While you may puzzle over my title, allow me to explain it later. On a Solemn feast like this many things occur that might be preached and taught. Allow three areas for reflection: The Reality of the Eucharist, The Requirement of the Eucharist...
     
  10. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    The Body of Christ, and The Body of Christ...
    As the great tradition associated with this feast tends to be observed these days more in the breach than the observance, lest anyone could use it on this Corpus Christi, here's a taste of a Eucharistic procession in the growing Indian church -- from Shillong in the country's northeast...
     
  11. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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  12. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    Blood of the Covenant: Reflections on the Solemnity of Corpus Christi...
    In sprinkling the blood of the covenant on the Israelites, Moses was symbolizing God’s desire in this covenant to make them His family, His “blood” relations. Quoting Moses’ words in today’s Gospel, Jesus elevates and transforms this covenant symbol to an extraordinary reality. In the new covenant made in the blood of Christ...
     
  13. Michie

    Michie Human rights begin in the womb. Supporter

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    Blood of the Covenant: Reflections on the Solemnity of Corpus Christi...
    In sprinkling the blood of the covenant on the Israelites, Moses was symbolizing God’s desire in this covenant to make them His family, His “blood” relations. Quoting Moses’ words in today’s Gospel, Jesus elevates and transforms this covenant symbol to an extraordinary reality. In the new covenant made in the blood of Christ...
     
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