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Bible version choices

Discussion in 'Suggest New Forums' started by ChristianForCats, May 14, 2019.

  1. ChristianForCats

    ChristianForCats God Seeker

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    With all respect to people who read KJV Bibles, I hate them. I only want modern English words and phrases and am sure other people feel the same way. Can CF please add links to versions? How about a Bible Versions subsection in Theology/Christian Scripture?
     
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  2. Jonaitis

    Jonaitis Well-Known Member

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    ---> ESV (English Standard Version)

    About the ESV

    The English Standard Version (ESV) is an "essentially literal" translation of the Bible in contemporary English. Created by a team of more than 100 leading evangelical scholars and pastors, the ESV Bible emphasizes "word-for-word" accuracy, literary excellence, and depth of meaning.

    Suited for personal reading, public worship, in-depth study, and Scripture memorization, the ESV is available in more than 200 print editions on Crossway.org and free digitally via mobile apps or online through ESV.org.

    Since its publication in 2001, the ESV Bible has gained wide acceptance and is used by church leaders, numerous denominations and organizations, and millions of individuals around the world.

    Translation Philosophy

    The ESV is an "essentially literal" translation that seeks as far as possible to capture the precise wording of the original text and the personal style of each Bible writer. As such, its emphasis is on "word-for-word" correspondence, at the same time taking into account differences of grammar, syntax, and idiom between current literary English and the original languages. Thus it seeks to be transparent to the original text, letting the reader see as directly as possible the structure and meaning of the original.

    In contrast to the ESV, some Bible versions have followed a "thought-for-thought" rather than "word-for-word" translation philosophy, emphasizing "dynamic equivalence" rather than the "essentially literal" meaning of the original. A "thought-for-thought" translation is of necessity more inclined to reflect the interpretive opinions of the translator and the influences of contemporary culture.

    Every translation is at many points a trade-off between literal precision and readability, between "formal equivalence" in expression and "functional equivalence" in communication, and the ESV is no exception. Within this framework we have sought to be "as literal as possible" while maintaining clarity of expression and literary excellence.

    Therefore, to the extent that plain English permits and the meaning in each case allows, we have sought to use the same English word for important recurring words in the original; and, as far as grammar and syntax allow, we have rendered Old Testament passages cited in the New in ways that show their correspondence. Thus in each of these areas, as well as throughout the Bible as a whole, we have sought to capture the echoes and overtones of meaning that are so abundantly present in the original texts.

    As an essentially literal translation, then, the ESV seeks to carry over every possible nuance of meaning in the original words of Scripture into our own language. As such, it is ideally suited for in-depth study of the Bible. Indeed, with its emphasis on literary excellence, the ESV is equally suited for public reading and preaching, for private reading and reflection, for both academic and devotional study, and for Scripture memorization.

    For more information about the ESV Bible, including information on the manuscripts used in the translation process, download the full Preface to the ESV.
     
  3. Jonaitis

    Jonaitis Well-Known Member

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    I do appreciate the King James Version for its literary level, style, and rendering as well as its longevity and uses by many theologians, preachers, and teachers throughout the English-speaking world for the last four hundred years. While the ESV is my first to go to translation, as well as the NASB (New American Standard Version), the King James can actually convey and communicate better in some areas than modern translations could (not always). "Bottles" is a better rendering than "wineskins" in the parable of the wine, in my opinion, but their meaning of the term is different than how we understand it now so it was necessary to update it. People put wine into "leather bottles" as they would put it.
     
  4. Nicolaus Mourer

    Nicolaus Mourer Call me Nic. Supporter

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    Why not read the New King James? It doesn't remove verses from the Bible like the other contemporary versions do, like Acts 8:37 and 1 John 5:7, which are extremely important doctrinal verses.
     
  5. ChristianForCats

    ChristianForCats God Seeker

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    I made the reason clear: Old English vocabulary and grammar. It is very hard to read because they use a word order that does not match the written language.
     
  6. Nicolaus Mourer

    Nicolaus Mourer Call me Nic. Supporter

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    Just FYI, the KJV is actually written in modern English with use of jacobean grammar to better translate the Hebrew and Greek 2nd person singular and plural tenses respectively. Technically, because of its language, the KJV more accurately follows the grammar of the original languages than any other contemporary translation.
     
  7. ChristianForCats

    ChristianForCats God Seeker

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    So it is supposed to be a word for word translation of Hebrewand Greek?

    The "th" and "st" where we write "ed" is a different spelling rule, like not using s to plluralize words in other langauges. I would expect any modern English documents to have "ed" for all past tense words.
     
  8. Nicolaus Mourer

    Nicolaus Mourer Call me Nic. Supporter

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    That would be more along the lines of a transliteration such as Young's Literal Translation. However, the King James translators employed the use of dynamic equivalence to translate from the original languages, to ensure perfectly accurate translation while providing readability at the same time. The King James, when examined, is actually a superb translation in what it aims to accomplish, which is why it is still the most widely read translation in English after 400 years.
     
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