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The Anchoress: 'We need St. Benedict'

Discussion in 'One Bread, One Body - Catholic' started by Michie, Sep 3, 2009.

  1. Michie

    Michie Manipulation Resistance Team Supporter CF Ambassador

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    http://insidecatholic.com/Joomla/index.php?option=com_myblog&show=The-Anchoress-We-need-St.-Benedict-.html&Itemid=127
     
  2. Fantine

    Fantine Dona Quixote

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    The Rule of Benedict certainly sets forth a model of servant leadership that every church leader should aspire to emulate.

    (Although I kinda think the consoling Cardinal has mastered that art quite a bit more successfully than the bellicose Bishop.)
     
  3. fated

    fated The White Hart

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    The Scranton bishop was loved... His leaving is very strange. What's he going to do now, I wonder.

    I read an article that said he closed some schools. I wonder why, I would be far more comfortable making people travel a bit to go to mass than closing a school.

    On the other hand, dying Churches can be very warm friendly places.

    In Scranton, they had to do some stuff, even closing parishes, it seems. Sometimes, it seems like it would be better to just get another bishop after you had one that pruned the vine, even if the next one is no less a diligent keeper. In that case, the problem would not be the bishop, but the parishioners, that cause the problem.

    Things are just not always as simple as they look.
     
  4. Fantine

    Fantine Dona Quixote

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    I read that he wanted to close HALF the parishes. That's not pruning, that's slashing and burning.

    But what is more important is the process. How much did he consult other people? How much input did local parish councils and parishioners have? Was this a "top-down" decision or something that was part of a prayerful discernment process by clergy and laypeople working together.
     
  5. fated

    fated The White Hart

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    Why the fear mongering theorizing?

    I bet you aren't even from Scranton and have some other beef with him, because you surely don't know enough about this situation to make such dramatic accusations.
     
  6. fated

    fated The White Hart

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    It is complete mental incompetence to accuse the Church of being to conservative and unfeeling for the poor on the one hand, and then attack it for closing parishes on the other. That makes no sense, because parishes are expensive, and they take up money the Church would otherwise use for things including helping the poor.

    I can understand disagreement to some extent, but blatant discriminatory, and prejudiced, and irrational, illogical viewpoint expressed... ridiculous.

    If you want more money for the actual poor, you close parishes, or you increase income. Sometimes you don't have much choice in the second part, and sometimes closing parishes will merely result in not being in the red.

    So, there you go, maybe he wanted to close parishes so he could care for the poor.
     
  7. Fantine

    Fantine Dona Quixote

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    I apologize. When I did the Math, I realized that 91 out of 209 is only 43.5% of the parishes in the diocese, not half.

    Scranton Bishop Joseph Martino, Biden's Nemesis, Resigns Under Cloud -- Politics Daily

    I know that sometimes bishops must make difficult decisions, but WWJD?

    Was Jesus ever called "abrasive and alienating?"
     
  8. fated

    fated The White Hart

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    I hear simmering hatred. This is about and deep aching desire for voting for pro-aborts isn't it.
     
  9. Fantine

    Fantine Dona Quixote

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    I think Bishop Martino's personality caused most of his difficulties. He is described as having a "peremptory style," being "abrasive," "controversial," and "dismissive."

    In other parts of the article, he is said to have made "intemperate blasts" and to be an "angry face."

    He was said to have "an overweening administrative style that irritated the flock and even his brother bishops."

    He was even said to have worn out his welcome with the Vatican.

    I like leadership that is inclusive, collaborative, open-minded, and respectful to all, and so naturally I took issue (as did many others) with such a leadership style.

    I have also noticed that in most dioceses long-standing inner city parishes are consolidated even while a diocese might be building brand new churches in the suburbs. Frequently the Catholic population has decreased in the inner city, but yet a church is a stabilizing influence in a neighborhood, and these parishes are located where the greatest human needs are...

    In inner cities where many people use public transportation instead of cars, traveling a few miles to church can be a real hardship.

    If, however, new Hispanic immigrants move into these inner cities, it might be necessary to reopen these parishes someday.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2009