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Bonfire Night- should Catholics celebrate it?

Discussion in 'General Theology' started by Supreme, Nov 4, 2010.

  1. Supreme

    Supreme Senior Moderator Staff Member Senior Mod Supporter Staff on LOA

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    Guy Fawkes Night - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    OK, so tomorrow is Bonfire Night, and here in the UK, everyone will go nuts. There will be fireworks, hotdogs and parties all the way through the night. Yet, given the history of this night, is it right for the five million Catholics in the UK to celebrate it? Keeping in mind that it commemorates the finding of a Catholic plot by an anti Catholic King, resulted in the deaths of Catholics and led to harsher laws against Catholics.

    Discuss.
     
  2. sunlover1

    sunlover1 Beloved, Let us love one another

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    Read the article.

    Wow. Never knew this.
     
  3. mg0086

    mg0086 Prospective Doctor of the Church

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    Hmm would this be like the English celebrating the 4th of July?

    I'm going to say no, not that I'm saying we're poor sports...just saying we shouldn't celebrate something we lost and wouldn't wanna remember anyway...
     
  4. sunlover1

    sunlover1 Beloved, Let us love one another

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    Makes sense to me too.
     
  5. Catherineanne

    Catherineanne Well-Known Member

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    I think it is best to get this one in proportion. The vast majority of those going to watch fireworks this weekend won't give a single thought to why they are doing it; we just want to have fun, and watch several thousands of pounds worth of fireworks explode overhead.

    I think it is doing the UK a serious disservice to assume that we retain the kind of anti Roman Catholic feeling that once existed, or that we regard this as a religious celebration of some kind. Why would Anglicans want to do that, do you think? Or Methodists? Or anyone else. This suggestion is rather distasteful, to be honest.

    If we think of it at all, it is as a failed terrorist plot; an attempt to murder in cold blood the whole of Parliament and the King. I see no reason to equate terrorist action with any faith, or any creed. If any Roman Catholics want to associate themselves with such behaviour and stay home, then they are welcome to do so. That is a side of Roman Catholicism that I am not familiar with, but perhaps it exists.

    Should the rest of us celebrate the failure of such a plot? Certainly. :)
     
  6. Catherineanne

    Catherineanne Well-Known Member

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    If I happened to be in the US on July 4, of course I would join in the celebrations, the same as in France on Bastille Day. Why not? I celebrate other people's birthdays, in spite of them not being my own. There is no difference.

    I think you have a strange idea of English people, mg.
     
  7. Supreme

    Supreme Senior Moderator Staff Member Senior Mod Supporter Staff on LOA

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    I think she meant whether or not this is the English equivalent of the 4th of July.
     
  8. Yarddog

    Yarddog Senior Contributor

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    What does it mean to the people now? Does it still carry anti-Catholic meanings in the minds of the British?

    If it is just a night of celebration then why not celebrate as one.
     
  9. LittleLambofJesus

    LittleLambofJesus Member since March 7 2006

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    Did ya happen to c da latetz memo :)

    http://www.christianforums.com/t7470158/
    Use of "anti" All please read!!!!
     
  10. Catherineanne

    Catherineanne Well-Known Member

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    That could be so. However, I prefer to answer the words as they are written rather than as they are not. It makes for an easier life. :wave:
     
  11. mg0086

    mg0086 Prospective Doctor of the Church

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    My main point is the celebration of a war lost and would rather forget. Why should we celebrate something that ended up backfiring against us?

    Forgive me for not living in the UK and knowing their customs...

    I recall wearing my British Invasion shirt to a bar on the 4th and getting pointed out for it...maybe that was cause for my reasoning?
     
  12. Catherineanne

    Catherineanne Well-Known Member

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    Certainly not. If it did, that would make half the country rabid bigots tomorrow night. Needless to say, we are not rabid bigots.

    This is, as I have said, about a failed terrorist plot, to murder very many innocent people. I think that is something for everyone to celebrate, whatever their religion.

    Quite right. :wave:
     
  13. Catherineanne

    Catherineanne Well-Known Member

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    I see no reason for any Catholic to rejoice if Guy Fawkes et al had succeeded. It is no more an act to be proud of than any modern bombing in the UK. Enough said.

    K. Quick summary of British customs; If there is an excuse to celebrate, particularly at this time of year, then get stuck in, and don't worry about the reason why.

    You got pointed to in a bar? Surely that was what you wanted, in wearing a shirt like that? :)

    So what is your problem.
     
  14. mg0086

    mg0086 Prospective Doctor of the Church

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    Actually i didn't know it was the 4th when i wore the shirt (dates got mixed up for me).

    I tried to pass it off as it being a part of history by saying we were invaded in the days prior...lol
     
  15. mg0086

    mg0086 Prospective Doctor of the Church

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    I see,

    I guess I'm fine with it if the reason behind it was forgotten, I just thought it was a bit odd was all...
     
  16. Nick T

    Nick T Newbie

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    As has already been said there is nothing wrong with celebrating the prevention of an act of terrorism although in reality Bonfire Night is just an opportunity to have fireworks, bonfires and nice food :D

    And on the subject of Bonfire Night have you heard about this?: BBC News - London firefighters' strike to go ahead

    A strike on Bonfire Night is just asking for problems :doh:
     
  17. Catherineanne

    Catherineanne Well-Known Member

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    The reason as far as Guy Fawkes is partly remembered. As anything to do with Catholic versus Protestant, not so much. In fact, I would honestly say, not at all. I know plenty of Catholics who enjoy the fireworks just as much as anyone else. :)
     
  18. QuantaCura

    QuantaCura Rejoice always.

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    We celebrate the death of many martyrs with great feasts, etc. St. Thomas Garnet, St. Nicholas Owen, Bl. Ralph Ashley, and Bl. Edward Oldcorne, among others, went to their heavenly reward as a direct result of that backlash--Garnet for refusing to reveal the confessions of the conspirators. Losses in this world are often victories for Christ. :)
     
    Rhamiel and Sphinx777 like this.
  19. LittleLambofJesus

    LittleLambofJesus Member since March 7 2006

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    Is my patron saint and martyr W. Tyndale on there by any chance :blush:

    http://www.christianforums.com/t7495160/
    Tyndale
     
  20. Supreme

    Supreme Senior Moderator Staff Member Senior Mod Supporter Staff on LOA

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    I would hardly call Guy Fawkes a martyr, Catholic or otherwise. James I was not exactly a great king, and was rather ruthless in his treatment of Catholics- but Guy Fawkes was prepared to kill innocent people in order to convey his message. There's no Catholic, nor even Christian doctrine that permits killing innocents.
     
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