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Why does Paul make such out of context quotes from the OT in Hebrews?

Discussion in 'Christian Scriptures' started by fishmansf, Nov 27, 2018.

  1. bekkilyn

    bekkilyn Contemplative Christian Supporter

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    Hebrews 1:5-13; 2:5-8, 12-14
    The writer of Hebrews (probably not Paul) was addressing a primarily Jewish Christian audience. One of the heresies that was going around at the time is that Jesus may have been divine as he claimed, but he was just another one of the angels rather than having the divinity of God himself. The author here is denying this heresy and claiming that Jesus is indeed the begotten Son of God.

    Hebrews 7:17-22
    In previous chapters and verses, the author of Hebrews talks about Jesus being our high priest and using a lot of comparisons to the Levite high priests in the old testament. Jesus is our high priest because he has taken on our sin and being that he had no sin as a human, he is able to be our mediator with God. The old covenant God made with the Israelites has been replaced by a better covenant through Jesus Christ.

    Hebrews 10:5-7
    In this chapter, the author talks about the sacrifices and sin offerings required under the old covenant with Israel, but that they were only a shadow of what is to come...Christ Jesus. Jesus is the final and only sacrifice that can permanently remove sin.

    Hebrews can be a difficult book to comprehend unless you are familiar with the rituals and sacrifices in the old testament. There is a lot more that could be said about all of the above verses, but the general idea in Hebrews is to encourage Jewish Christian believers (who were undergoing heavy persecution and under a lot of temptation to go back to their old ways) to persevere in their new faith, and to demonstrate to them using Hebrew scripture references that were very familiar to them that Jesus is God and not just another prophet or even an angel.
     
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  2. Halbhh

    Halbhh Everything You say is Life to me Supporter

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    All from Hebrews? Ok, I'll look at those later this evening.
     
  3. Hank77

    Hank77 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Most of us are not skilled theologians, neither do we read the original languages. Although there are quite knowledgeable people here.
    I just leave you with a link to a very helpful site. There are several commentaries. I use Clarke and Gill most often. Clarke knew many languages, around 20, including Hebrew, Koine Greek, Aramaic, Syriac, Arabic, etc. so he could read the oldest MSS in their original languages. Clarke and Gill, one Arminian and one Calvinist, and yet they agree almost all the time on the meaning of a scripture. They were both knowledgeable on the Jewish writings and views on OT scripture.
    Hebrews 1 Clarke's Commentary

    Enjoy studying and don't worry so much, be at peace with Him. God Bless
     
  4. hedrick

    hedrick Senior Veteran Supporter

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    I don't believe the passages cited are out of context at all. The author (not Paul) is using royal Psalms as precedent for calling Jesus the son of God. The king was referred to (metaphorically) as the son of God, as his direct representative. This raises questions about Christology that aren't appropriate here.

    Heb 10:5-7 is part of a section saying that Christ's act is better than sacrifices at dealing with sin. Thus he quotes one of a number of passages where the prophets say that God doesn't require sacrifice. He quotes this absolutely in context. It's just that some Christians think God does require sacrifices, and thus can't take Hebrews at face value. If you look at Heb 9 - 10 closely you'll see that it sees Jesus' death as a covenant sacrifice, to establish the new covenant. Not a sin sacrifice that is somehow needed for God to forgive. The new covenant writes God's law in our hearts, and thus is better than sacrifice, because it actually deals with the root of the problem.See Rom 3:25. This gets into the whole concept of what the atonement means. Jesus, Paul, and Hebrews all say that Jesus' death was part of establishing the new covenant, which deals with sin by renewing our hearts. See the Words of Institution for Jesus' statement.The beginning of Rom 6 is Paul's, though not quite as explicit with the new covenant terminology.
     
  5. fishmansf

    fishmansf New Member

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    Thanks!
     
  6. fishmansf

    fishmansf New Member

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    I really appreciate it thanks!
     
  7. danielmears

    danielmears Member Supporter

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    Some folks do not pay enough attention to the Old Testament. Throughout the scriptures starting with Genesis the Old ties in with the new. Jesus came to fulfill the law not to destroy. He was helping the people to truly understand the existing scriptures which show man is made in the image of God, that thoughts matter, the kingdom is within, and how the Word operates moving the invisible creating the visible.
     
  8. Halbhh

    Halbhh Everything You say is Life to me Supporter

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    I see you already have some useful answers, and let's look closely at a few of the specific verses.
    First we want to be reading the Hewbrews wording in full passages, and I feel all of chapter 1 is one passage:
    Hebrews 1 NIV
    At the bottom of the chapter are the cross references.

    Looking at the first, we see Psalms 2:7, but we know we want to be reading fully, which here will mean the entire psalm, which should be read as one whole thing.

    Reading through, because we continue reading, verse 8 jumps out:
    "Ask me,
    and I will make the nations your inheritance,
    the ends of the earth your possession."


    Notice this is far more territory or influence than Israel ever ruled, far more. So, we sense right here in verse 8 a bigger thing is being talked of than only the 40 year kingship of David.

    Much more is being pointed to -- a Kingdom that will encompass all the Earth, in time....

    See? It's not about David even, but about this Kingdom, a holy Kingdom, that can encompass all the Earth.

    The next reference is to 2 Samuel 7:14. Again we want to see the full sense of what this is saying, so we read the passage, here verses 1 through 17.
    2 Samuel 7 NIV

    As we read we see the promise to David, and by verse 14, we know it's Solomon his son that is referred to, but we continue reading (!)....and hit verse 16. Look what happened. See verse 16. Again, something profoundly more far reaching is suddenly brought onto this promise.

    Nothing less than actual eternity!

    See what's happening? A King is coming who will fulfill this promise in verse 16. His mortal parents will be Joseph and Mary, of the line of David, as promised, but He will rule forever.
     
  9. danielmears

    danielmears Member Supporter

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    Hebrews 1:5-13 references to Psalm 2:7 which in the KJV bible cross references to Acts 13:33 God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that He hath raised up Jesus again; as it is written in the second Psalm, Thou art my son, this day have I begotten thee. The next cross references with 2Peter3:13 speaking of the new earth to come, then a ref. from Job 7:17 which the Hebrews would have knowledge of. Then he is speaking of Jesus again ref. to Matthew 28:18 And Jesus came and spake saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. It also ref. Ephesians 1:22 The author continues to write about Jesus in Heb2:12-14 then in Hebrews 7:17-22 he is comparing Jesus to Melchisidec which means King of Righteousness in Hebrew so of course the people knew who he was speaking of. He is in Genesis, a high priest, king of Salem, which means peace. The last is speaking of Jesus coming and giving his body as a sacrifice coming to do God's will, taking away the sacrifice of bulls and goats with Jesus being the second. Then in Heb.10-10 he tells why, By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all. Heb.10-10 The Old Testament corresponding with the New helps us to understand the scriptures better, many things were foretold. I hope this helps. At least you started a good Bible study.
     
  10. W2L

    W2L Well-Known Member

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    Psalms 44:22 Yet for your sake we face death all day long;
    we are considered as sheep to be slaughtered.

    Romans 8:36 As it is written: “For your sake we face death all day long;
    we are considered as sheep to be slaughtered.”[j]
     
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