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What's your college major?

Discussion in 'College Life' started by elahmine, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. pilgrimsong

    pilgrimsong Newbie

    76
    +9
    Christian
    Single
    Psychology and for my masters finished Human Resources
     
  2. Helena Winters

    Helena Winters New Member

    4
    +1
    Christian
    Mathematics, wow!
    I am an English major :grinning:
     
  3. MiniEmu

    MiniEmu ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    +1,033
    Anglican
    Married
    Biology.

    So many people are studying such interesting things!
     
  4. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

    +8,825
    United Kingdom
    Baptist
    Private
    Business Management.
     
  5. RileyG

    RileyG Veteran

    +437
    United States
    Catholic
    Celibate
    US-Republican
    Double major in psychology and religious studies. Will graduate in 2018. Seems so far away....

    Hopefully will get my masters in social work.
     
  6. Chany

    Chany Uncertain Absurdist

    +215
    Agnostic
    Single
    US-Others
    Philosophy and Economics. Aiming for a PhD in Philosophy.
     
  7. Caitlyn Foxhoven

    Caitlyn Foxhoven New Member

    8
    +1
    Single
    US-Republican
    Deciding between returning to Liberty University in Lynchburg, VA (or online) and Regis University in Denver, CO.

    Soooo hard....

    Majoring in Politics and minoring in English and Pre-Law.
     
  8. vanillaicecream

    vanillaicecream Melting...

    +462
    Catholic
    Single
    Almost done with my Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering.

    Still thinking if I'll proceed to graduate school.
     
  9. Messy Jessi

    Messy Jessi Here I Am To Worship

    25
    +17
    Christian
    Single
    CA-Conservatives
    Music is my Major. I want to become a Music Teacher when I graduate.
     
  10. MyLordMySavior

    MyLordMySavior MyLordMySavior

    285
    +53
    Christian
    Single
    US-Republican
    Journalism and Electronic Media.

    I want to be a sports reporter :p
     
  11. Fortran

    Fortran Newbie

    +228
    Christian
    Single
    My present major is web development. However, there is a fair change I will transfer to either computer science or information technology for my Bachelors.
     
  12. seashale76

    seashale76 Orthodox Christian and Unapologetic Iconodule

    +3,992
    Eastern Orthodox
    Married
    The first time I got a B.A. in Anthropology with a minor in English. I also have a Master of Arts in Teaching. I'm now working on a B.S in Nursing.
     
  13. HannahElizaW

    HannahElizaW God Says It, THAT Settles It!

    402
    +95
    Baptist
    Celibate
    I'm intending on getting a BBA in International Business and a MBA in Accounting.
     
  14. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

    +8,825
    United Kingdom
    Baptist
    Private
    I just did a module on accounting and finance. No thanks!
     
  15. fatherjimparker

    fatherjimparker Newbie

    614
    +152
    Eastern Orthodox
    BA English Lit
    MA Counseling Psychology
    MBA
    MA Theology

    Should have learned a trade.............
     
  16. Ada Lovelace

    Ada Lovelace Grateful to scientists and all health care workers Supporter

    +9,130
    United States
    Christian
    In Relationship
    Those are really wise degrees to pursue because of the stable employment opportunities they'll offer. :)

    I'm considering majoring in Philosophy, which infamously has one of the lowest unemployment rates but has the highest median LSAT score for law school. Plus I love it. But we shall see! At my college we don't declare majors until our sophomore year and I haven't even begun my freshman year yet, so I have some time to explore and consider.
     
  17. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

    +8,825
    United Kingdom
    Baptist
    Private
    What? You get TWO years in before you actually start studying your subject? That seems like a colossal waste of time and money lol.
     
  18. Ada Lovelace

    Ada Lovelace Grateful to scientists and all health care workers Supporter

    +9,130
    United States
    Christian
    In Relationship
    I was just returning to my post to make a clarification to it, but you quoted me within a minute, haha.

    We actually have the option of declaring our major during our first year, and the liberty to change it later if we decide to pursue another degree. It's just far more common to declare during the sophomore year because the first year curriculum is carefully crafted to help equip us to make a confident, thoroughly considered decision. We won't be larking about for a year before delving into courses relevant to our degree. We'll be taking a series of courses designed to help us to flourish in our chosen majors and in our lives. Most will additionally take specific courses for the degrees we're interested in. Declaring a major isn't as simple as just checking a box; you have to apply for it and fulfill some qualifications. If you're interested this helps to explain how we organize our first year of study: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/approaching-stanford-topics/crafting-your-first-year-study

    I'm definitely interested in Philosophy as either a minor or my primary undergrad major, but am also exploring the Public Policy - Law and the Legal System degree or the Public Policy - Political and Moral Philosophy tract, as well as International Relations because they all align with my goals. All of the majors require about 34 units of preparation coursework, so next year I'll knock out the common ones that are a requirement for all the majors I'm considering. There isn't a set pre-law major but there are specific majors that provide a stronger foundation for law school. I don't know exactly which one is ideal for me yet. I do know I want to pursue a coterm degree (BA and MA combined) and law school. I'll use this upcoming year to figure more things out. I don't think any of my time or my parents money will be wasted. They are delighted about my plans.
     
  19. High Fidelity

    High Fidelity Well-Known Member Supporter

    +8,825
    United Kingdom
    Baptist
    Private
    Interesting. Here you apply specifically for the course you choose to study and if you want to change you forfeit and apply again to the other degree. Subject-specific coursework begins from day one.

    Are your BA/BSc degrees only 2 years then?
     
  20. Ada Lovelace

    Ada Lovelace Grateful to scientists and all health care workers Supporter

    +9,130
    United States
    Christian
    In Relationship
    There are definitely advantages to being able to dive immediately into your chosen field of study! It can be time efficient and less costly, and provide more extensive preparation for your career. I have twin cousins who are 19 and attending universities in England, and at their encouragement I applied to study Law at Oxford. If I had decided to go there the annual tuition would have been significantly less even as an international student than the tuition for a university in my own state, and I would have finished my degree in four years (with the program I applied to) rather than four years of undergrad plus three years of law school. I was intimidated at the idea of immediately beginning law school at 17, though, and there were also several other important factors that compelled me to decide to stay in California. One of my cousins is thriving in his course and loves it, while the other was miserable and regretful. She had chosen Psychology without really having much of an understanding about the course or the career prospects. Having already invested so much hard work and time in that course she was reluctant to leave it, but ultimately decided to because she knew it wasn't right for her. She is now in a bridge program to switch to Physical Therapy. I think a lot of people aren't quite ready at 16, 17, or 18 to solidify their career choices, so for some that's a perk of the American format for universities. The year of more general studies serves as both preparation for the major and as time to allow you to explore academic interests and career prospects, as well as to grow into yourself a bit more.

    Anyhoooooo. It traditionally takes four years to earn a B.A., B.S., or B.A.S. at Stanford and the majority of other universities in the U.S. The last two and a half years of courses are usually exclusively in the major(s), and the first year and a half of courses are typically Gen Ed (General Education Requirements) and prerequisites for the courses in the major(s). For a single degree at Stanford a minimum of 180 units of University work must be completed with satisfactory grades, and for a dual-degree (concurrent B.A. and B.S. degrees) the minimum for graduation is 225 units. Students typically take 12 to 15 units per quarter, and three quarters a year. The summer quarter is mandatory for some majors and optional for others. The number of specific coursework units required for the major and the number of prerequisites before taking those units varies significantly. The STEM majors typically require more advanced prerequisites before commencing with studies in the degree, and require more units in the department / program overall. Many who plan to become STEM majors take AP (Advanced Placement) classes in high school that are eligible for college credit, such as AP Calculus and AP Physics, to fulfill some of the credits in advance. My brother just graduated with a degree in Biomedical Computation, and it was far more intense than whatever major I'll likely end up choosing. He's smarter, so he could handle it, haha. In addition to the General Education courses everyone takes, they stock up on computation and biology courses during their freshman and sophomore years. In their junior and senior years the coursework is specialized. The BMC degree also requires at least two quarters of advanced research. Some other majors also have additional requirements for graduation, such as an internship, a capstone / thesis project, or study abroad.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2015
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