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What denominations believe in the Rapture?

Discussion in 'Denomination Specific Theology' started by RileyG, May 12, 2022.

  1. The Liturgist

    The Liturgist Traditional, Liturgical, Wesleyan, Orthodox Supporter

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    I am saying that the SDA views on the Rapture (which you have been accurately stating, as your knowledge of SDA doctrine is exceedingly thorough) differ in some respects from the original conceptualization of Darby. This by the way is not intended in any sense as a criticism but rather as a mere observation.
     
  2. roman2819

    roman2819 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Most mainstream denominations Baptists, Presbytherians, Pentecosts, United, Lutherans etc believe in rapture I suppose
     
  3. BobRyan

    BobRyan Junior Member Supporter

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    I fully agree that our view of the soon return of Christ being the "appearing" where all the saints are raptured differs from Darby in that at the same time the non-rapture element to that event is that all the lost are slain as we see in Rev 19, 2 Thess 1, and Jer 4:23-26. So the non-rapture elements to our eschatology does differ with Darby.

    But when it comes to a focus on just the aspect of Jesus resurrecting the "dead in Christ" (as Paul calls them in 1 Thess 4) and taking all them as well as all those who are in the category "we who are alive and remain" (as Paull calls them in 1 Thess 4) -- then it is the same point that the saints are taken to heaven at that event, literally, bodily.
     
  4. BobRyan

    BobRyan Junior Member Supporter

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    Baptists for sure...
     
  5. BobRyan

    BobRyan Junior Member Supporter

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    Well given that this is a thread on the Rapture and a Catholic member is asking what denominations hold to it and even what it is - I don't think we can redefine rapture as "saints go to heaven bodily when they die" or "saints souls go to heaven when they die" and stick with the focus of the question in the OP.
     
  6. tall73

    tall73 Sophia7's husband Supporter

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    Then you and @The Liturgist will have to stop misunderstanding each other, leading to him answering questions you didn't ask, and you asking questions about what he didn't say.

    He confirmed he was only saying that many churches teach the dead go to heaven PRIOR to the end, whereas you asked about people going to heaven AFTER Jesus appearing.
     
  7. tall73

    tall73 Sophia7's husband Supporter

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    His knowledge is thorough enough to know, as he has said in other places, that the SDA don't actually call it the rapture, but the second coming. But he has taken to calling it the rapture when speaking to those familiar with that term.

    Since others may not understand that wrinkle I mention it here so folks don't get confused talking to most Adventists who don't often speak of the rapture by that term.
     
  8. ViaCrucis

    ViaCrucis Evangelical Catholic of the Augsburg Confession

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    Lutherans do not. We subscribe to the historic Creeds of the Church which confess that when Christ returns He comes in judgment of the living and the dead, and with Him is His kingdom that shall not end. And is clearly expressed in the following words of the Augsburg Confession (the central Lutheran confessional text):

    "Also they teach that at the Consummation of the World Christ will appear for judgment, and will raise up all the dead; He will give to the godly and elect eternal life and everlasting joys, but ungodly men and the devils He will condemn to be tormented without end." - The Augsburg Confession, Article XVII

    -CryptoLutheran
     
  9. The Liturgist

    The Liturgist Traditional, Liturgical, Wesleyan, Orthodox Supporter

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    This is inaccurate, not just in the case of Lutherans as @ViaCrucis pointed out, but really, in the case of most mainstream denominations aside from Pentecostals and some Evangelicalist and Fundamentalist Calvinist groups.

    Basically, as I said earlier, the doctrine of the Rapture originated in the 19th century with John Nelson Darby, a leader in the more severe branch of the Plymouth Brethren known as the Exclusive Brethren (no relation to the Evangelical United Brethren which would later merge with the Methodist Episcopal Church to form the United Methodist Church).

    The Rapture is not a part of the traditional beliefs of any of the following North American denominations:
    • Anabaptist
    • Anglican (ACNA, Continuing Anglican, Anglican Church of Canada)
    • Baptist (traditionally, although some Baptist churches have embraced it)
    • Chaldean Catholic
    • Christian Church / Disciples of Christ
    • Church of the East (Ancient/Assyrian)
    • Congregationalist
    • Eastern Catholic (Italo-Albanian, Melkite, Ruthenian, Ukrainian, etc)
    • Eastern Orthodox (OCA, ROCOR, Antiochian, Greek Orthodox, etc)
    • Episcopalian
    • Lutheran (ELCA, LCMS/LCC, WELS, ELS)
    • Mennonite
    • Methodists (United Methodist, Global Methodist)
    • Nazarene
    • Maronite Catholic
    • Molokan
    • Moravian
    • Old Catholic (Union of Scranton)
    • Old Catholic (Union of Utrecht)
    • Oriental Orthodox (Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, Syriac)
    • Other Old Catholic
    • Presbyterian
    • Quaker (Friends)
    • Reformed
    • Remonstrant
    • Roman Catholic
    • Russian Old Orthodox / Old Believer
    • Salvation Army
    • United Brethren in Christ
    • United Church of Canada
    • United Church of Christ
    • Waldensian
    • Wesleyan Methodist

    Note this list is extremely incomplete. In general, traditional liturgical churches and magisterial Protestant churches do not subscribe to this doctrine. For that matter, I am not sure that all of the Plymouth Brethren adhere to it either. At a minimum, when John Nelson Darby promulgated the concept of the Rapture, he did so from within one half of a schism within the Plymouth Brethren movement, specifically the Exclusive Brethren, as opposed to the Open Brethren, and my recollection is that even among the Exclusive Brethren he was controversial.

    This is not to suggest that the doctrine of the Rapture is a fringe belief - far from it. It is extremely popular among non-denominational megachurches as well as Pentecostals and for that matter, any churches which adhere to Premillenial Dispensationalism. As proof of its popularity, one need look no further than the runaway success of the Left Behind series of books, including the Tribulation Force young adult novels.

    I have to confess I am not a fan of those works; while I frequently appreciate Christian writing that I do not agree with on a doctrinal level, for example, the Divine Comedy of Dante Allegheri, or on a more serious note, theological works such as Calvin’s Institutes or the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas, or for that matter the writing of the brilliant Jewish philosopher Moses Maimonides, I find little in the Left Behind books which strikes me as being particularly conducive to piety or moral development. Indeed in reading them and viewing the films I found that the plot seemed driven by a sense of morbid curiosity.

    There is also the distressing aspect of the character of the anti-Christ, “Nicolae Carpathia,” allegedly Romanian, who I regard as a racist depiction. Aside from the fact that Carpathia is not a Romanian last name and the Carpathians are a separate ethnic grouping comprised of Rusyns and Lemkos (the latter group including noted artist Andy Warhol), historically members of the Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church in America and the American Carpatho-Rusyn Orthodox Diocese, the Romanians themselves are an extremely Christian country with the largest Eastern Orthodox population outside the former Soviet Union. Nicolae for that matter is an extremely common name; St. Nicholas is a fourth century bishop highly venerated among Eastern Orthodox for his charity (he saved several young girls from being forced into prostitution and along with St. Basil is part of the inspiration for Santa Claus), for his slapping of the heretic Arius at the Council of Nicaea (which caused him to be temporarily deposed, as the ancient canon law of the early church strictly prohibits clergy from hitting anyone), and for his miraculous myrhh-streaming relics, so in any Eastern Orthodox land you will find Nicholas an extremely common name.

    Doubtless the authors were going for a name inspired by the evil dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu, but I expect for Romanians this would only have made it more offensive.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2022
  10. roman2819

    roman2819 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You seem to say that in North America, Baptists, presbytherians and Anglicians and United denominations do not believe in Rapture. If true, I am shocked.

    i used to attend Mennonite and baptist churches in Canada, and they believe in Rapture. When I attended the United church in Tokyo, they too believe in rapture.

    In Singapore, almost all the main denominations believe in rapture including the Anglicans, baptists, Presbytherians, Lutherans. For example: I attended a 4 year course at an Anglican church in Singapore, it covered all modules of the Bible and evenn took exams: The course definitely taught about the Rapture.
    I used to attend Baptist and Presbytherian churches too in SIngapore, and both believe in Rapture. For sure the Pentecostals as well.

    Is it possible that same denomination in different countries can differ in their view of Rapture.
     
  11. The Liturgist

    The Liturgist Traditional, Liturgical, Wesleyan, Orthodox Supporter

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    I suspect what you are calling the Rapture is not in fact the doctrine developed in the 19th century by John Nelson Darby, but rather, presumably, in Singapore the word Rapture is being used in a generic sense to refer to the Second Coming. @Shane R and @Paidiske - have you heard of that? Because I’ve never heard of an Anglican church teaching the premillenial dispensationalist doctrine of the Rapture in any form, but obviously, all of the churches mentioned by our friend @roman2819 do teach the doctrine of the Second Coming, since that is integral to the Christian faith and is included in bith the Nicene and Apostles Creed.

    For that matter @roman2819 , it would be extremely helpful if you could tell us what you understand the word “rapture” to mean, and also if you were to describe in detail what you were taught at the four year course you attended at the Anglican church.

    As an aside, I did note in my list that some Baptist churches have bought into the premillenial dispensationalist theology including the doctrine of the Rapture, because many Baptist churches are Evangelical or Fundamentalist Calvinist, two groups among which Premillennial Dispensationalism and thus the Rapture is popular. Likewise it would not surprise me if some Presbyterian churches bought into the concept. It should of course be stressed that the theology of the rapture, dating from the 19th century, is alien to historic Baptist and Presbyterian theology, although in the specific case of Baptist churches, the Baptists have always stressed the autonomy of individual baptists to interpret the scriptures as they see fit, as well as the autonomy of local churches, so on that basis, it is easy to understand how a novel doctrine like that of the rapture could permeate into Baptist churches. In the case of Mennonite churches, the bishops are supposed to act as gatekeepers, and likewise, in the case of Presbyterian churches, the presbyteries are supposed to act as gatekeepers, but in both denominations new theological ideas have been known to take root, more so than in confessional Lutheranism, for example.
     
  12. RileyG

    RileyG Veteran

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    I do not know any Lutherans or Presbyterians who believe in the rapture
     
  13. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

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    Disclaimer: I have only quickly skimmed the thread before replying.

    There are Anglicans influenced by fundamentalist Americans who believe in "the rapture" in the sense I think it is meant here. I believe it could be possible that such influence is strong in a place like Singapore. However, I would not consider that to be a mainstream or official Anglican belief, and certainly the way I was trained would lead me to say that it rests on a very poor Scriptural basis.
     
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  14. RileyG

    RileyG Veteran

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    Interesting. I wonder if those Anglicans would be mostly low Church or evangelical.
     
  15. Shane R

    Shane R Priest Supporter

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    Charismatic or evangelical. ACNA has a fair number of clergy who were not cradle Anglicans and attended evangelical seminaries. One can occasionally be found in the premillenial camp.
     
  16. RileyG

    RileyG Veteran

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    Interesting!
     
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