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Traditional Theology Census

Discussion in 'Traditional Theology' started by Tallguy88, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. charles at doctrineprimer

    charles at doctrineprimer Newbie

    44
    +7
    Baptist
    Married
    US-Republican
    I have been a Baptist for about 45 years
     
  2. Dialogist

    Dialogist Active Member

    341
    +105
    Eastern Orthodox
    Married
    US-Libertarian
    Eastern Orthodox
     
  3. dms1972

    dms1972 Well-Known Member Supporter

    +502
    Non-Denom
    Single
    Mission fellowship, with Presbyterian connections.
     
  4. Gregoire de Nazianze

    Gregoire de Nazianze Member

    83
    +6
    Protestant
    Celibate
    CA-NDP
    Hi, I' m French Canadian confessing catholic Christian or pro-testant (pro=for/testari=confess). I believe in Jesus-Christ, attested by the unaltered Nicene Creed, according to the scriptures, ALONE.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2015
  5. Tangible

    Tangible Decision Theology = Ex Opere Operato

    +1,243
    United States
    Lutheran
    Married
    Soyez le bienvenu. I like the way you describe yourself. What church body do you attend?
     
  6. J. Bleize

    J. Bleize Member

    69
    +34
    Croatia
    Protestant
    Single
    US-Democrat
    Protestant (although I do not want to belong to any "group", and see divisions as pointless) I believe solely in what is said in the Scriptures.
     
  7. topcare

    topcare The Eucharist is Life

    +1,584
    Christian
    Married
    US-Republican
    Welcome to the forums. That's not really Traditional Christianity
     
  8. MarkRohfrietsch

    MarkRohfrietsch Unapologetic Apologist Supporter

    +3,621
    Lutheran
    Married
    Sola Scriptura is a tradition that goes back about 500 years.;)
     
  9. topcare

    topcare The Eucharist is Life

    +1,584
    Christian
    Married
    US-Republican
    Maybe but it's not Traditional however, Traditional means we don't go by just Scripture alone :oldthumbsup:
     
  10. Aelred of Rievaulx

    Aelred of Rievaulx Well-Known Member

    +605
    Catholic
    Private
    Aelred - Catholic with sympathies to Orthodoxy and interest in the wide plurality of pre-Tridentine Christianities and Syriac and Ethiopian Orthodoxy.
     
  11. DanielGarneau

    DanielGarneau Co-heir with Christ

    48
    +5
    Canada
    Christian
    Married
    I was born and raised in a Roman Catholic family in Quebec, Canada, in the 50's and 60's. It was while living in Ontario, British Columbia and Alberta in the 70's, that my interest in reading the Bible was kindled, through non denominational and pentecostal Christians. Back to my home town in Quebec in the 70's, my faith was nurtured in a Baptist church fellowship until 80's, and then in non denominational context to this day.
     
  12. MoreCoffee

    MoreCoffee Repentance works.

    +2,421
    Catholic
    Private
    But not an apostolic tradition.
     
  13. NonTheologian

    NonTheologian Active Member

    138
    +66
    Eastern Orthodox
    Married
    Eastern Orthodox. Former Roman Catholic.
     
  14. jesus4gaveme03

    jesus4gaveme03 Newbie

    13
    +7
    Baptist
    Single
    US-Republican
    Raised Catholic, visited various churches during my adolescent life as my family moved around. During my military career, found Southern Baptist to be the most welcoming to me. Now I am exploring my witnessing abilities through Living Waters and the School of Biblical Evangelism.
     
  15. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +11,660
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Anglican priest, in the diocese of Melbourne, Australia. I was not raised going to church, and was baptised as an adult.

    A colleague in communion with Canterbury! I've never actually met an Old Catholic priest; they are very small in Australia. Delighted to meet you here.
     
  16. OzSpen

    OzSpen Regular Member

    +612
    Australia
    Baptist
    Private
    Paidiske,

    Are you an Anglican in communion with the evangelical Anglican Ridley College in Melbourne or not?

    Your Brissy mate,
    Oz
     
  17. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +11,660
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Ohh, now there's a loaded question!

    There are two Anglican theological colleges in Melbourne, and I went to the other one. But yes, we are actually in communion. ;)
     
  18. OzSpen

    OzSpen Regular Member

    +612
    Australia
    Baptist
    Private
    Mark,

    That is not what I've found in my research of the early church fathers. There is language in some of these prominent fathers that sounds awfully similar to Sola Scriptura.

    See my article: Is there no ‘Scripture alone’ in early church fathers?

    Oz
     
  19. OzSpen

    OzSpen Regular Member

    +612
    Australia
    Baptist
    Private
    I know there are 2 Anglican Colleges in Melbourne, so I was checking which one you attended. So you attended Trinity College and not Ridley College. I find it interesting that both of these colleges, with different traditions, are located in the same suburb of Parkville, Vic.

    Does that reveal that you are in the liberal (modernist or postmodernist), Anglo-Catholic tradition in Melbourne?

    Oz
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2016
  20. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +11,660
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Both colleges have historical links to the University of Melbourne, which is why they're so close together.

    Not exactly, about me. Okay, a bit of my story: I came into the church as an adult (was 22 when I was baptised). I originally attended a parish that was out on the charismatic-evangelical edge (although back then I didn't know that there were different kinds of Anglicans). I worshipped there for quite some years and was married there, but when I started to discern a vocation to ministry, they wouldn't support a woman who felt called to a leadership role.

    So I moved from there and started exploring a bit. When I came to choose a college, I looked at and was impressed with both colleges, but I was very aware by then that I had had a very narrow exposure to the church, and I was still a relatively young Christian (I started college at 27). So I thought it would be good for my formation to develop some appreciation of the breadth of the Church by studying in the college of the less-familiar end of the tradition. Also, at that time Trinity had an arrangement with the both the Jesuit college and the Uniting Church college to share classes, so if I went to Trinity I would be studying with lecturers and fellow-students from other denominations as well. And I thought that would be good for me (and it was).

    So I went to Trinity despite being probably the least Anglo-Catholic student there, and very much a fish out of water in terms of churchmanship. I did field placements in a range of settings - on both sides of the tradition - and my first curacy was in a very Anglo-Catholic parish. Now, in my second curacy, I work across two neighbouring parishes, one of which is evangelical and one is Anglo-Catholic.

    Today I would say that I am able to work across the breadth of the traditions in Melbourne, in terms of liturgy and spirituality. I am not a liberal (at least, I don't consider myself one; I suppose some people would say an ordained woman is a liberal by definition), but boringly orthodox in my theology.

    But I think it's also worth saying that despite Trinity having a "liberal" reputation, I didn't find its staff or teaching particularly so. On the whole my lecturers were profoundly godly men and women whom I could look up to as exemplars in the life of faith.
     
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