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The Assurance of Salvation

Discussion in 'One Bread, One Body - Catholic' started by Humble_Disciple, Aug 2, 2021.

  1. Humble_Disciple

    Humble_Disciple Well-Known Member

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    I would like to apologize for not being previously clear as to what I meant about the assurance of salvation. My own view of assurance is perhaps closer to the Catholic teaching than the "easy-believism" promoted by many evangelicals today.

    This is from the doctrinal statement of the Salvation Army, of which I used to be a member:

    This would mean that our assurance of salvation is conditional upon continued, obedient faith, rather than the presumption that God will save us no matter how we live, even if we fall away from the faith.

    I agree with Catholics that good works and avoidance of sin are necessary to confirm our salvation, but I wouldn't use the same list as to what those good works are, such as praying the rosary or performing Eucharistic adoration.

    At the same time, I believe that good works and avoidance of sin are a gift of God's grace, imparted to us as sanctifying grace from Christ's finished work on the cross:
    Imparted righteousness - Wikipedia

    This seems to more or less be the Catholic teaching as well:
     
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  2. anna ~ grace

    anna ~ grace Newbie Supporter

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    The more I have learned from Catholic Saints, and the more I have taken them as examples and heroes, the more awesome, subtle, holy, and amazing the gift of salvation seems to me.

    It is an ongoing journey of faith, and works. Fueled by love.
     
  3. Humble_Disciple

    Humble_Disciple Well-Known Member

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    In Catholic teaching, what happens if one dies in a state of mortal sin without confessing it to a priest?
     
  4. anna ~ grace

    anna ~ grace Newbie Supporter

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    Oh My Jesus, hide me in the wound of Your Sacred Heart. Free me from my evil desire to be loved and esteemed. Guard me from the mean pursuit of fame and honour. Make me humble till I become a small spark in the flame of love in Your Sacred Heart. Grant me the grace to forget myself and all worldly things. Jesus, sweet beyond words, convert all worldly consolations into bitterness for me. O my Jesus, Sun of Justice, enlighten my intellect and mind with Your Sacred Rays. Purify my heart, consume me with burning love for You, and make me one with You. Amen.

    Saint Alphonsa of India
     
  5. Humble_Disciple

    Humble_Disciple Well-Known Member

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    Other than the term "sacred heart," this reminds me of prayers that the Puritans wrote:
    Valley Of Vision — Free Online !!

    If a Catholic is unable to have access to a priest while dying, would it be good enough to confess one's mortal sin directly to God, without the intercession of a priest?

     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2021
  6. Fenwick

    Fenwick ☩ Broman Catholic ☩

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    Barring an act of perfect contrition, which is actually very hard to achieve, the Church teaches a two-fold understanding: A) if we die in a state of mortal sin, then we go to hell unless we manage to still make an act of perfect contrition at the moment of our death - though in reality this is very hard to achieve. B) It's ultimately up to God whether he receives a person into heaven or not. We just have what we know through the divine revelation given to the Church since the time of Christ.

    I'll say this right now: I'm answering your question, but I'm not interested in debate, or some kind of "gotcha".
     
  7. Humble_Disciple

    Humble_Disciple Well-Known Member

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    I think you've provided a satisfying answer, even if I might disagree with the need of confession to a priest rather than directly to God.
     
  8. Chesster

    Chesster Junior Member

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    The Catechism answers this: When it arises from a love by which God is loved above all else, contrition is called “perfect” (contrition of charity). Such contrition remits venial sins; it also obtains forgiveness of mortal sins if it includes the firm resolution to have recourse to sacramental confession as soon as possible (1452).
     
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  9. zippy2006

    zippy2006 Dragonsworn

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    A better source than the Joint Declaration would be the Catechism. The Joint Declaration was never officially approved by the Catholic Church. See the section on justification and the following sections (#1987...) (link).

    If you die in a state of mortal sin you go to Hell. If you are forgiven before you die--either through confession to a priest or an act of perfect contrition--then you would no longer be in a state of mortal sin, and hence would no longer die in a state of mortal sin.

    This paper may be helpful for those who are interested in the question:

     
  10. Humble_Disciple

    Humble_Disciple Well-Known Member

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    The reason why I don't want to be a Catholic is because I don't want to be a cafeteria Catholic, picking and choosing which parts of the catechism I happen to agree with. I believe that would be disrespectful to Catholicism to practice a faith that I don't really believe in.

    It has nothing to do with being anti-Catholic, which is why I am happy that, after Vatican II, we are not longer "heretics" but instead "separated brethren."

    Separated brethren - Wikipedia
     
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