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So what do you do about the embarrassing celebration of the confederacy that is Stone Mountain.

Discussion in 'News & Current Events' started by Goonie, Jul 1, 2020.

  1. Goonie

    Goonie Not so Mystic Mog. Supporter

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  2. Ana the Ist

    Ana the Ist Aggressively serene!

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  3. disciple Clint

    disciple Clint Well-Known Member

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    Maybe we could just accept the fact that we cannot change history, as a nation we need to recognize those times when we made mistakes as well as those times when we lived up to our standards. If we erase all of our mistakes we will be living in a make believe world and we might not learn from our past, that could result in making the same or very similar mistakes.
     
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  4. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It's important to put art in context, which alot of the tourism around Stone Mountain does not.

    There's a museum dedicated to Jim Crow-era racist art and imagery, for instance, but it places it in its historical context:

    Jim Crow Museum - Ferris State University
     
  5. JustSomeBloke

    JustSomeBloke Wo-choo-lookin-at?

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    Maybe activists will manage to find a dynamite supplier who is sympathetic to their cause. Then we'll see something like this:

    Destruction of Buddha statues by the Taliban using dynamite

    Edit: I'd like to add that I find it more than a little strange that having fought the Taliban for years, partly on the basis that they are intolerant extremists, America is now under attack from domestic intolerant extremists who seek to destroy statues in much the same way that the Taliban did.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
  6. Goonie

    Goonie Not so Mystic Mog. Supporter

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    The problem is that Stone Mountain is not some war monument, but a commemoration of a group of people who went to war to defend their right to own other human beings, finished as recently as 1970.

    It's time to let nature take its course and for the state of Georgia to stop celebrating slavery.
     
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  7. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Comparing statues of the Buddha, who is venerated by hundreds of millions of people for his wisdom and compassion, with a monument to a racist regime, is grotesque
     
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  8. disciple Clint

    disciple Clint Well-Known Member

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    what does that art itself say? is it not up to each of us to see in art what we see based on our views.
     
  9. Tom 1

    Tom 1 Optimistic sceptic Supporter

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  10. Goonie

    Goonie Not so Mystic Mog. Supporter

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    The history says that this massive carving on the hill where the Modern KKK was founded, was and to some still is a commemoration of slavery. The context is clear, unlike with war memorial s.
     
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  11. Tom 1

    Tom 1 Optimistic sceptic Supporter

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    There are similar displays of soviet era art in parts of Europe.
     
  12. tbstor

    tbstor Sifting through the unknowable.

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    So... a war monument.
     
  13. Goonie

    Goonie Not so Mystic Mog. Supporter

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    Not, In the sense of remembering the dead. It is a commemoration to those who sent soldiers to preserve their right to own other people, on the site where the Modern KKK was founded.
     
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  14. JustSomeBloke

    JustSomeBloke Wo-choo-lookin-at?

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    Most people with a prominent position in history are known for more than one thing, but sadly some people only ever see the worst in other people, and incorrectly assume that a statue of that person is always a commemoration of the worst things they ever did. Many of these people are perpetually on the lookout for something to be offended or outraged about. I don't know why they are like this, maybe they don't have any productive or gainful interests or hobbies, and their only satisfaction in life comes from trying to make themselves feel morally and ethically superior by finding others from the history books that did a bad thing. I think it's a rather silly pursuit to spend hours, days, and even years judging people from hundreds of years ago by modern standards. It is certainly telling that these people seek to tear down and destroy rather than create, and I would argue that pulling down statues is a form of book burning.
     
  15. tbstor

    tbstor Sifting through the unknowable.

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    Are those men who "sent soldiers" dead? If so, it is a remembering of the dead. You may not like those dead people, but quite obviously a lot do (according to Wikipedia, it has been the most visited destination in the state of Georgia since 2017).
     
  16. Goonie

    Goonie Not so Mystic Mog. Supporter

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    It's not war monument, in the same way that if Munich, Germany to put up a mass carving of Hitler, Himmler, Goering and Goebbels would not be.
     
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  17. tbstor

    tbstor Sifting through the unknowable.

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    Why would it not be? Hitler, Himmler, Goering, and Goebbels were not popular after the conclusion of the war. If they had been, perhaps there would be monuments. Historical southern figures were never out of vogue, if you will.
     
  18. Lost4words

    Lost4words Jesus I Trust In You Supporter

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    Just leave it alone. Its a reminder of past history.

    Should Auschwitz be flattened? Again, its a reminder of our past. Of the bad times. Hopefully where those that died, can be remembered and for the atrocities to never happen again.
     
  19. Goonie

    Goonie Not so Mystic Mog. Supporter

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    Sigh. It was not built as a memorial to the war dead but to commemorate the 'lost cause' that cause being slavery and the right own people.
     
  20. tbstor

    tbstor Sifting through the unknowable.

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    You've introduced the term "lost cause," but you appear to not understand what it is about. What is academically labeled as "lost cause" is not "slavery and the right to own people." In fact, that is purposefully downplayed in lost cause narratives.

    I understand that Southern history probably doesn't hold much significance for you, which is fine. Though it does hold significance for many Southern Americans, myself included. I have numerous ancestors on both sides of my family that served in the Confederate infantry. I view them no differently than my ancestors that fought in the Revolutionary War.

    Slavery was the motive for secession, it was not the motive for the war. You'll note that the Southern states peacefully seceded from the Union. It wasn't until the leadership of the North failed to release Fort Sumter (which fell on Confederate land) that the war broke out. Slavery was not what caused shots to be fired. It was a desperate hope for restoration on the part of the Union which caused the war to take place.

    Boiling down the significant cultural differences between the North and South to just slavery is about as misleading as it can get.
     
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