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Featured Resurrection, First Resurrection and New Birth

Discussion in 'Eschatology - Endtimes & Prophecy Forum' started by Fullness of the Gentiles, Jun 22, 2020.

  1. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    I asked some questions in another thread and received the following correct replies:

    1. Would humans be able to be with God in heaven if they are not in Christ?

    No, you must be born again to see or enter the Kingdom of God.

    2. Do humans have to be born of the Spirit to be in Christ?

    Yes.

    SCRIPTURES RELATING TO THE RESURRECTION

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/11SrklChVRkx3EtsbgLhRCTv9QQnr_sXf/view?usp=sharing


    1 Cor 15
    22 For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.

    23 But each in his own order: Christ the first-fruit (aparche), and afterward they who are Christ's at His coming;

    The above is referring to a bodily resurrection. Let's see if we can ascertain if any of the verses below are referring to a spiritual resurrection:

    (A) BODILY RESURRECTION

    John 6:40 (words of Christ): And this is the will of Him who sent Me, that everyone who sees the Son and believes on Him should have everlasting life. And I will raise him up at the last day.

    1 Cor 6:14 And God has both raised up the Lord, and also will raise us up by His own power.

    NOTE 1:

    There is no New Testament verse where the Greek word anastasis (resurrection) is talking about anything other than the bodily resurrection of the dead. See for example:-

    Mat 22:23; Mark 12:18; Luk 2:34; Luk 20:27; John 5:29; Acts:- 4:2; 17:18; 17:32; 23:8; 24:15; 2 Tim 2:18).

    NOTE 2:

    Likewise, there is no New Testament verse speaking about being raised up from death that is not speaking of being raised up bodily - they all refer to the bodily resurrection from the dead, example:-

    Matthew:- 11:5; 16:21; 17:23; Mark:- 6:14; 14;28; Luke:- 7:22; 9:22; 20:37; John:- 12:1 & 9 & 17; Acts:- 2:24 & 32; 3:15 & 26; 4:10; 5:30; 10:40; 13:30 & 34 & 37; Romans:- 4:24 & 25; 6:4 &9; 7:4; 8:11 & 34; 10:9; 1 Cor 6:14; 1 Cor 15:12-17 & 29 & 32 & 35 & 42-44 & 52-54; Gal 1:1; 1 Thess 1:10; 2 Tim 2:8; 1 Pet 1:21; Rev 1:18.

    Romans 8
    10 and if Christ is in you, the body, indeed, is dead because of sin, and the Spirit is life because of righteousness,
    11 But if the Spirit of the One who raised up Jesus from the dead dwells in you, the One who raised up Christ from the dead shall also make your mortal bodies alive by His Spirit who dwells in you.

    CHRIST'S RESURRECTION:

    Rom 4:22 And therefore (Abraham's faith) was imputed to Abraham for righteousness.
    Rom 4:23 Now it was not written for his sake alone, that it was imputed to him;
    Rom 4:24 But for us also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on him that raised (egeiro) up Jesus our Lord from the dead;
    Rom 4:25 Who was delivered for our offences, and was raised (egeiro) again for our justification.

    As we can see, the bodily resurrection from the dead is a major theme in the New Testament, and is a major part of the gospel.

    (B) BEING BORN FROM ABOVE

    John 3:3 KJV
    Jesus answered and said unto him, "Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again (Greek: anothen), he cannot see the kingdom of God."

    Strongs: G509
    00509 G509 ἄνωθεν anōthen an'-o-then
    From G507; from above; by analogy from the first; by implication anew: - from above again from the beginning (very first) the top.


    JOhn 3:3 Young's Literal Translation
    Jesus answered and said to him, `Verily, verily, I say to thee, If any one may not be born from above, he is not able to see the reign of God;'

    John 3:5-7 (Young's Literal Translation)

    Jesus answered, `Verily, verily, I say to thee, If any one may not be born of water, and the Spirit, he is not able to enter into the reign of God;

    that which hath been born of the flesh is flesh, and that which hath been born of the Spirit is spirit.

    Thou mayest not wonder that I said to thee, It behoveth you to be born from above;


    Compare the above with John's statement below:

    John 1:12 But as many as received Him, He gave to them authority to become the children of God, to those who believe on His name,
    John 1:13 who were born, not of bloods, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but were born of God.

    CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS BASED ON THE ABOVE FACTS
    (you can answer them if you like but I'm not demanding you do - I'm placing them here for consideration):-

    1. Have we risen from the dead bodily?

    2. Does being born from above imply birth, or bodily resurrection from death?

    3. Did we die for the sins of the world and rise again from the dead? Or did Christ die for the sins of the world (and our sins) and rise again from the dead?

    4. If we are born from above by the Spirit, and the Spirit is Christ's Spirit, are we IN HIM who died and rose again from the dead by virtue of our birth?

    5. Are we in Christ who died for our sins and rose from the dead positionally by virtue of our having been born of His Spirit and by virtue of His bodily resurrection?

    Or is it by virtue of our resurrection?

    6. Are those who are born from above and found in Christ found IN HIM due to their works?

    Or are they born from above and found in Christ because of Christ's works?

    7. Did Christ rise again from the dead spiritually, or did He rise again from the dead bodily?

    8. Remember that we are told, regarding the resurrection:

    Rom 6:3 Do you not know that as many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into His death?
    Rom 6:4 Therefore we were buried with Him by baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father; even so we also should walk in newness of life.
    Rom 6:5 For if we have been joined together in the likeness of His death, we shall also be in the likeness of His resurrection;

    1 Cor 15
    20 And now, Christ hath risen out of the dead--the first-fruits (aparche) of those sleeping he became,
    for since through man is the death, also through man is a rising again (anastasis, resurrection) of the dead,
    22 For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ all will be made alive.
    23 But each in his own order: Christ the first-fruit (aparche), and afterward they who are Christ's at His coming;

    Therefore, bearing in mind that the Greek word anastasis (resurrection) and the concept of being raised from death in the New Testament is always talking about the BODILY resurrection, does the following mean that we are resurrected already?:-

    Eph 2:6 and has raised us up together and made us sit together in the heavenlies in Christ Jesus,

    Col 2:12 buried with Him in baptism, in whom also you were raised through the faith of the working of God, raising Him from the dead.

    Col 3:1 If then you were raised with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ is sitting at the right hand of God.

    9. Does Eph 2:6 and Col 3:1 mean that we are already resurrected?

    Or does it mean that we are not yet resurrected, but we are POSITIONALLY in Christ who is risen?

    10. When in time does Paul say we will be resurrected?

    11. Does being born from above mean we are resurrected?

    AM I WRONG to say the following?

    From all that the New Testament says regarding the resurrection, am I wrong to say that:-

    1. NOWHERE in the New Testament do we see being born again from above by the Spirit of Christ being called a "resurrection" - we HAVE TO read such a notion INTO the scriptures in order to maintain that belief.

    2. By virtue of our birth from above we are found IN CHRIST who died and was raised, and therefore we are now positionally with Him and have been raised with Him - THIS FACT is the guarantee, the deposit, of our coming inheritance in Christ, and our resurrection:

    Rom 8:23 And not only so, but ourselves also, who have the firstfruit of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, awaiting adoption, the redemption of our body.
    Rom 8:24 For we are saved by hope. But hope that is seen is not hope; for what anyone sees, why does he also hope for it?

    3. By virtue of our birth from above we are NOW positionally in Christ's death and resurrection because for those who have been born from above by the Spirit of Christ, the Spirit of Christ lives in our spirit, and our spirit lives in our soul, and our soul lives in our body. This is why we cannot die:

    John 11: 25 Jesus said to her, I am the Resurrection and the Life! He who believes in Me, though he die, yet he shall live.
    John 11:26 And whoever lives and believes in Me shall never die. Do you believe this?

    NOT THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT BUT THE HOUSE THAT GOD BUILT

    Christ in us and we in Him (John 15:4). God's Spirit in our spirit, our spirit in our soul and our soul in our body

    - but this is not the house that Jack built - it's the house that God built:

    1 Cor 3:16 Do you not know that you are a temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwells in you?
    1Cor 3:17 If anyone defiles the temple of God, God shall destroy him. For the temple of God is holy, which you are.

    Therefore we live in the knowledge that because of Christ's resurrection (which is a bodily resurrection), THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN BORN FROM ABOVE will be bodily resurrected when Christ returns - but those who have died in Christ will rise first and those who are still alive will be changed and rise up together with them, to meet the Lord in the air (1 Thess 4:16-18).

    AM I WRONG TO CONCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

    1. Due to the fact that NOWHERE does the New Testament call being born from above either a "resurrection", nor "the first Resurrection", those who read "first resurrection" into a birth of the Spirit from above, are reading INTO the New Testament what is not there?

    2. The scriptures show, when using exegesis instead of eisegesis, that the first (protos) resurrection following Christ's, who is the firsfruit (aparche) of the resurrection, is this one:

    1 Cor 15
    22 For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.

    23 But each in his own order: Christ the first-fruit (aparche), and afterward they who are Christ's at His coming;

    And I saw thrones, and they sat upon them, and judgment was given unto them: and I saw the souls of them that were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast, neither his image, neither had received his mark upon their foreheads, or in their hands;

    and they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years.

    But the rest of the dead did not live again until the thousand years were finished.

    This is the first (protos) resurrection. Blessed and holy is he who has part in the first resurrection. The second death has no authority over these, but they will be priests of God and of Christ, and will reign with Him a thousand years. (Rev 20:3-6).
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2020
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  2. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    Seeing you carefully avoided this post on the last thread, I will re-post it here:

    The Christian experiences two resurrections - spiritual and physical.

    So if a Christian was spiritually dead before salvation and they are now spiritually alive, by what means does Scripture say we are brought from death into newness of life?

    The only way that we can transition from death to life (both spiritually and physically) is by way of resurrection. There is no other way! This is demonstrated many times in Scripture in regard to both spiritual and physical resurrection.

    Two resurrections result for the believer from Christ’s one resurrection. Man needs both spiritually redeemed and physically redeemed. When one gets saved they are spiritually redeemed. But they are not physically redeemed until resurrection day. His “first resurrection” secured both resurrections for those who will put their faith in Christ.

    Romans 6:3-6 says, “Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death? Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up (or) egeiro (Strong’s 1453) from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection (or) anastasis (Strong’s 386): Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.”

    There are two Greek words used in Romans 6:3-10 that are used to describe the resurrection of Christ, and that are significantly in turn purposely equated to the believer and the new birth experience; they are egeiro (Strong’s 1453) and anastasis (Strong’s 386). Such a correlation between these two diverse types of resurrection (physical and spiritual) is only secured through Christ’s sinless life, atoning death and glorious resurrection, enabling the believer to walk in resurrection power and “newness of life.” The believer here is therefore supernaturally transferred from a condition of death into one of life. This undoubtedly relates (1) to a spiritual state, and, (2), to the here in now. It cannot relate to the physical resurrection which is still future and which occurs at the second coming of Christ.

    The first word egeiro (Strong’s 1453) is used many times throughout the New Testament to describe the Lord’s physical resurrection. These references are found in Matthew 14:2, 16:21, 17:9, 23, 20:19, 26:32, 27:63, 64, 28:6, 7, Mark 14:28, 16:6, 14, Luke 1:69, 9:22, 24:6, 34, John 2:19, 20, 22, 21:14, Acts 3:15, 4:10, 5:30, 10:40, 13:30, 37, Romans 4:24, 25, 6:4, 9, 7:4, 8:11, 34, 10:9, 1 Corinthians 6:14, 15:4, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20, 2 Corinthians 4:14, 5:15, Galatians 1:1, Ephesians 1:20, Colossians 2:12, 1 Thessalonians 1:10 and 1 Peter 1:21.

    Similarly, the other Greek word anastasis (Strong’s 386), which is identified several times in Scripture with the new birth spiritual resurrection is also used several times to describe the Lord’s physical resurrection. It is derived from the root word anistemi (Strong’s 450). These are outlined in Mark 8:31, 9:31, 10:34, 16:9, Luke 18:33, 24:7, 26, John 20:9, Acts 2:24, 31, 32, 3:26, 4:2, 33, 10:41, 13:33, 34, 17:3, 18, 26:23, Romans 15:12, Philippians 3:10 1 Thessalonians 4:14, 1 Peter 1:3, 3:21.

    The same two Greek words that are repeatedly employed to describe Christ’s physical resurrection from the dead are also used in Ephesians 5:14 to describe the new birth experience of the believer. The sinner being commanded: Awake (or) egeiro (Strong’s 1453) thou that sleepest, and arise (or) anistemi (Strong’s 450) from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light (Ephesians 5:14).

    The resurrection portrayed here is again not a physical resurrection, but, a spiritual resurrection in which the recipient (the sinner) receives the joy of salvation. Through this spiritual resurrection, the believer receives the “light” of God and is therefore spared the awful sentence of eternal wrath. The verb “arise” in this text specifically relates to salvation and is a metaphor describing the spiritual resurrection that Christians undergo when they are lifted from the grave of sin. It also demonstrates the blessing that follows this resurrection. The true child of God receives the blessed light of God’s dear Son the Lord Jesus Christ.

    The Lord Himself declared in John 8:12, “I am the light of the world, he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.” It is worth noting, Paul is speaking to first century Ephesian citizens in this reading, who lived at least 1,950 years away from the actual return of the Lord. He is offering them the opportunity of walking in the fullness of the resurrection life then. Moreover, this resurrection life is still available today to sinners that humbly bow their knee to Christ.

    If the Premillennialist can see that there is a resurrection in the New Testament, pertaining to the believer, which precedes the physical resurrection, which releases a man from the punishment of the second death (eternal wrath) – involving the new birth experience, then he should be able to accept the fact that it is the “first resurrection.”

    Luke 2:34 also records, “Simeon blessed them, and said unto Mary his mother, Behold, this child is set for the fall and rising again anastasis (or resurrecting, Strong’s 386) of many in Israel; and for a sign which shall be spoken against.”

    Matthew Henry explains in relation to this passage, “He (Jesus) is set for the rising again of many in Israel, that is, for the conversion of many to God that are dead and buried in sin, and for the consolation of many in God that are sunk and lost in sorrow and despair. Those whom he is set for the fall of may be the same with those whom he is set for the rising again of. He is set eis ptosin kai anastasin - for their fall, in order to their rising again; to humble and abase them, and bring them off from all confidence in themselves, that they may be exalted by relying on Christ; he wounds and then heals, Paul falls, and rises again”

    The believer is raised from the grave of his sin and spiritual death at conversion, which of necessity must be a spiritual resurrection. Paul says in 2 Corinthians 1:8-10, “For we would not, brethren, have you ignorant of our trouble which came to us in Asia, that we were pressed out of measure, above strength, insomuch that we despaired even of life: But we had the sentence of death in ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which raiseth (or) egeiro (Strong’s 1453) the dead: Who delivered us (past tense) from so great a death, and doth deliver (present tense): in whom we trust that he will yet deliver us (future tense).”

    This whole passage is concentrated upon the great eternal provision of spiritual deliverance. The word “raiseth” in this reading is a present active verb, therefore it is talking about a resurrection that is happening now, rather than the future physical resurrection. This is obviously speaking of spiritual resurrection, because it alone has been ongoing since Christ’s first (physical) resurrection. This will, of course, culminate with the general physical resurrection at His return.

    Paul goes on then to emphasise the victorious ongoing hope that the risen saints have through salvation, regardless of what is arrayed against them. He is reminding the believer of the security that exists “in Christ.” Whilst justification is an act (when we are spiritually redeemed) and glorification also an act (when we are physically redeemed), sanctification is a process of making us more like Christ. In all three experiences Christ holds a firm grip upon His people. He looks after them, and sustains them along the way. Christ therefore has “delivered,” (past tense) “doth deliver” (currently) and “will yet deliver” (future tense) Hi sheep.

    So the allusion to “God which raiseth the dead” is talking in a broad sense about the day of salvation (the here-and-now). It describes the ongoing spiritual process secured through Christ’s glorious resurrection from the dead. For someone to move from death and the grave (in either the natural or the spiritual) to life (natural or spiritual) requires resurrection.

    The same word repeatedly applied to Christ’s physical resurrection in the New Testament – egeiro – is here again used spiritually to describe the spiritual resurrection of the believer from the reality of spiritual death. It shows a present realisation and victorious triumph over that state in this testimony of Paul. This reading does not at all indicate that the believer will not experience natural death, no, but rather, that he wouldn’t experience spiritual death. It positively outlines that through the spiritual (or first) resurrection the believer is rescued from entering into the awful realisation of the second death (eternal punishment).

    Colossians 2:10-14 says, “ye are complete in him, which is the head of all principality and power: In whom also ye are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ: Buried with him in baptism, wherein also ‘ye are risen with him’ (or) sunegeiro (Strong’s 4891) through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised (or) egeiro (Strong’s 1453) him from the dead. And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened (or) suzoopoieo (Strong’s 4806) together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses; Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross.”

    This explicit passage describes the act of salvation as a resurrection feat. Moreover, the raising of the forgiven child of God in resurrection power in salvation is in turn carefully identified with, and connected to, Christ’s glorious resurrection. It confirms that our hearts “are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ” in salvation, and likens this supernatural work to a death, burial and resurrection. This reading shows how the child of God is “buried with him,” “quickened together with him,” and finally “risen with him.”

    Before salvation we are carnally alive, but spiritually dead. Our natural man is alive and kicking but our spiritual man is totally unresponsive. So in order to shift from death to life our spiritual man must first experience the quickening power (or life giving touch) of the Holy Spirit in which our blind spiritual eyes are opened in order for us to see as God sees. In this he sees sin for what it is, putrid, ugly and destructive. He see that sin is an offence to God and that it must be punished. The Holy Spirit then shows the penitent sinner the way out – Jesus Christ and His shed blood at Calvary. He then trades His sin for Christ’s righteousness in salvation whereupon he is raised from the grave of his sin.

    Salvation is a supernatural act in which God breathes spiritual life into the sinner through regeneration. He quickens the corpse through the work of the Spirit, enabling the sinner to recognise his plight and cry out for mercy. The sinner surrenders all confidence in self (he dies to self) and acknowledges his need of Christ. Spiritual resurrection results.
     
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  3. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    I will resubmit this, as it was carefully avoided by you and other Premils on another thread. This is further supporting evidence to support my above contention.

    It is a scriptural fact, for someone to move from death and the grave (in the natural or the spiritual) to life (of either type) requires of necessity resurrection. By our very union with Christ and the victory He has already wrought for us over death we enter into the triumph of both spiritual and physical resurrection. Upon conversion we are immediately raised from spiritual death by way of spiritual resurrection. We are born again (or born from above) by being raised from the grave of sin and debauchery. It is the resurrection of the spirit that causes the new birth. When resurrected our spirits are brought from death to life, this causes a new spiritually birth within our being.

    When viewing this subject we must always remember, we are body, soul and spirit. The dead area within the human being prior to conversion is the spirit. The body is alive and the soul (the old man) is alive but the spiritual part of him – his spirit – is dead. It is therefore the dead spirit that is (1) quickened, and (2) resurrected from its death that begets life and therefore a new nature or a living spiritual man. The work of the Holy Spirit in sanctification is then a process of bringing body and soul into subjection of that live spirit.

    The wording relating to this spiritual resurrection – “ye are risen with him” – is translated from the Greek word sunegeiro (Strong’s 4891), which is derived from the coupling of two other Greek words sun (Strong’s 4862) – denoting union and togetherness, and egeiro (Strong’s 1453), which means to awaken or resurrect from the dead. This word egeiro is constantly used in the New Testament in reference to Christ’s physical resurrection.

    Also, the word rendered “quickened” in the above passage is translated from the Greek word suzoopoieo (Strong’s 4806), which is derived from combining the words sun (Strong’s 4862) with zoopoíeo (Strong’s 2227), meaning to make alive, give life and revitalize. Hence, we can see the deep meaning of this word in the aforementioned passage and the essential work that is perfected in the penitent sinner in regeneration.

    Many new birth passages in Scripture are surrounded in resurrection terminology. Notwithstanding, they are not in any way referring to a physical resurrection, although, often, using the same type of language that accompanies literal ones. These references repeatedly describe spiritually dead men being spiritually made alive by being first spiritually quickened and then spiritually resurrected from the grave of their sin. This reading plainly outlines how the penitent sinner is raised with the exact same supernatural power that raised Christ at His resurrection, saying, “ye are risen with him through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead.”

    Colossians 2:10-14 therefore proves that there is a resurrection in the New Testament that precedes both natural death and the physical resurrection. Moreover, it is a resurrection that has an absolute bearing on ones ultimate place in eternity generally and the lake of fire (the second death) in particular. It is a resurrection that if missed unquestionably results in eternal fire. It is a resurrection that wonderfully frees a man from the awful (deserved) penalty of eternal punishment and eternity in the lake of fire.

    Colossians 3:1-4 goes on to add, If ‘ye then be risen with (or) sunegeiro (Strong’s 4891) Christ (speaking in the present tense about those who have experienced spiritual resurrection in Christ), seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God. Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth. For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God. When Christ, who is our life, shall appear (speaking of the second coming), then shall ye also appear with him in glory (referring to the physical resurrection which is future tense).”

    There are two distinct resurrections outlined in this reading, the first being spiritual and the second being physical. The initial resurrection of necessity sees a spiritual change, whereas, the second resurrection of necessity requires a physical change. Interestingly, the Greek word sunegeiro is again used here to describe the spiritual resurrection of the penitent sinner through union with Christ. No one could surely dismiss the current reality of the resurrection outlined at the beginning of the above passage. Moreover, those that have experienced the aforementioned resurrection are then instructed to “seek” and “set their affection” upon “those things which are above” – spiritual actions that are to be performed in this scene of time. The key to experiencing the reality of this current resurrected life is found in the concluding part of the reading that our earthly life is “hid with Christ in God.”

    The resurrection mentioned in this reading must of necessity precede the physical resurrection at Christ’s Coming. The physical resurrection is still future, whereas the spiritual resurrection is depicted here as current and ongoing. The coming of Christ, and the physical resurrection that accompanies it, is anticipated in this reading as a future event – the time when we shall yet “appear with him in glory.” Those that are described here as being presently “risen with Christ” enter into the resurrection life long before physical resurrection day (the day that the Premillennialists argue witnesses the first resurrection). Whilst there is no actual reference in the Bible to “a second resurrection,” commentators from all the respective eschatological camps concede that there is (at very least) a second resurrection, albeit they differ greatly on its nature, timing and who it applies to.

    Ephesians 2:1-6 also says, you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins; Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience: Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others. But God, who is rich in mercy, for his great love wherewith he loved us, Even when we were dead in sins, ‘hath quickened us together’ (or) suzoopoieo (Strong’s 4806) with Christ, (by grace ye are saved) And hath ‘raised us up together’ (or) sunegeiro (Strong’s 4891) and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus.”

    The same two Greek words found in Colossians 2:10-14 are also used in this reading to describe the spiritual resurrection. Again, the word rendered “quickened” here in Ephesians 2 is the Greek word suzoopoieo, which indicates a uniting to Christ in mystical union by means of being spiritually revitalized and made alive. The Greek word sunegeiro carries the meaning of union with Christ through resurrection. It is also in the aorist active demonstrating that it relates to the present. All sane theologians know that is not therefore not talking about physical resurrection.

    The quickening of the spiritually dead life results in a consequential spiritual resurrection. Resurrection cannot plainly occur unless God in His providence reaches down in supernatural quickening power and imputes spiritual life into a spiritually dead man.

    This reading undoubtedly describes a resurrection of the dead which occurs long before physical resurrection. It must thus be a spiritual resurrection. Moreover, it is a resurrection that was performed whilst we were expressly “dead in sins.” The reading tells us that God “hath raised us” – the elect of God – “up.” This resurrection narrative is speaking exclusively of salvation, as is seen in the whole import of the passage. After describing this spiritual revitalization, the writer deliberately inserts (so as to eliminate any possible ambiguity): “by grace ye are saved.” How then could any Premillennialist deny that this raising from the dead outlined here is not spiritual? We must ask such: are all these aforementioned references to death ‘spiritual death’ or ‘natural death’?

    Here the sinner that was once spiritually dead is now spiritually resurrected by the supernatural resurrection power of the Lord Jesus Christ; God has firstly “quickened” us and secondly “raised us up.” We are hence raised from the grave of our sin at conversion, which is a spiritual resurrection, into a newness of life (Romans 7:6). One wonders how anyone could reasonably interpret such explicit terms like “raised us up” in Ephesians 2 and “ye are risen” in Colossians 2:10-14 to mean anything other than a spiritual resurrection?

    Ephesians 2:1 literally reads:

    you humás
    were óntas
    dead nekroús
    in toís
    trespasses paraptoómasin
    and kaí
    the taís
    sins hamartíais

    The Lord is not simply equating the spiritual condition of a man outside of salvation to the physically dead; he is speaking of an actual real experiential condition of death than is common to all unregenerate men. It is a spiritual reality. It doesn’t merely say ‘we were similar to the dead in sins’, no; it says “we were dead in sins.” This death is obviously not physical as it is speaking of the alive. It is spiritual. For a man to be brought from death to life in the natural requires resurrection, likewise, to be brought from death to life in the spiritual requires resurrection. This occurs by the dead sinner being spiritually quickened and then spiritually raised.

    Romans 4:17 says, speaking of that great father of the faith Abraham, “(As it is written, I have made thee a father of many nations,) before him whom he believed, even God, who quickeneth (or) zoopoieo (Strong’s 2227) the dead, and calleth those things which be not (unbelieving Gentiles) as though they were (the people of God).”

    Again, the word rendered “quickened” in the above passage is translated from the original word zoopoieo meaning to make alive, give life and revitalize. It is the same word used in Ephesians 2:5 and Colossians 3:1, only it is prefixed there by the Greek word sun in those passages. This passage is describing how God breathed spiritual life into the once darkened Gentile nations, and brought them into a personal relationship with the living God. Those within the nations that received God’s provision for sin and uncleanness were then immediately brought from a condition of spiritual death unto a state of spiritual life through the precious work of Christ at Calvary. This quickening of the Gentiles is therefore plainly not just a future hope but a joyous present reality.

    In the new birth, the nature of Christ is imputed into the believer thus raising him up from a spiritual grave into a real living communion with God. I John 3:14 succinctly explains, We know that we have passed from death unto life.” How? This text makes it clear that the death that is conquered here in the-here-and-now is assuredly not physical but spiritual death. The sinner that believes (and is thus born again of the Spirit of God) has entered into the realisation of the first resurrection in this life and will one day be physically raised at the second resurrection unto life.

    Keeping in mind the awful separation that occurred when Adam spiritually died when he partook of the forbidden fruit in the garden, and allowing for the fact that all mankind was represented in Adam in that fall, we now see the great reconciliation that is realised between God and man through Christ in the act of salvation. The sinner is made spiritually alive and brought into mystical union with God through the person and work of Christ, by supernaturally receiving life and by being spiritually revitalized.

    Conclusion

    We have seen how the Greek word anastasis (Strongs 386), used in Revelation 20 to describe the first resurrection, is related to the new birth in several New Testament passages. We have seen how its root meaning anistemi (Strongs 450) is also related to the new birth experience. We have seen how other similar resurrection words like egeiro (Strong’s 1453) and zoopoíeo (Strong’s 2227) are also identified with the first spiritual resurrection.
     
  4. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    None of this proves your position. Go back to the New Testament and quote verses where the resurrection being spoken of is referring to anything except a bodily resurrection.
     
  5. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    None of this proves your position. Go back to the New Testament and quote verses where the resurrection being spoken of is referring to anything except a bodily resurrection.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2020
  6. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    My posts above negate your thesis completely. Obviously, that is why you have repeatedly avoided them. Avoidance does not prove your case, it rather exposes it. If you were not bound by your Premil beliefs you would happily acknowledge (and embrace) the sacred teaching submitted in regards to spiritual resurrection. It is taught throughout the NT, and even in the OT.
     
  7. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    No it shows that you cannot post the scriptures in the New Testament which talk about the resurrection from the dead which are not referring to a bodily resurrection.

    Have fun ducking and diving the issue.
     
  8. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    There is no greater example of a spiritual resurrection than that outlined in the vision of the valley of dry bones in the book of Ezekiel 37:13-14. There we learn, And ye shall know that I am the LORD, when I have opened your graves, O my people, and brought you up out of your graves (in a supernatural spiritual resurrection), And shall put my spirit in you, and ye shall live, and I shall place you in your own land: then shall ye know that I the LORD have spoken it, and performed it, saith the LORD.”

    This familiar Old Testament passage is undoubtedly immersed in metaphorical language, and is undoubtedly speaking of a spiritual resurrection of the spiritually dead. God is speaking specifically of His elect – “the whole house of Israel” (v 11) and of a widespread move of revival power. For any person
    to be raised from a grave requires resurrection. In this case the people are physically alive, therefore it is plainly not speaking of a physical resurrection. Therefore, we can safely deduce that these persons that are held in the awful bondage of a spiritual grave are then ‘uwbha`ªlowt or ‘brought up’ or ‘raised up’ into newness of life by means of a supernatural resurrection.

    The wording of this passage is consistent with the spiritual terminology of many of the New Testament passages that describe the same resurrection of the new birth experience. The gist of this passage is beyond dispute, and is in no real need of interpretation. God succinctly declares, “ye shall know that I am the LORD, when I have opened your graves, O my people, and brought you up out of your graves, And shall put my spirit in you, and ye shall live.”

    The Holy Spirit has always been the means by which the elect of God were spiritually convicted, spiritually raised, spiritually led and spiritually ‘ministered through’. Moreover, salvation has always been through faith and therefore by spiritual resurrection. With all truth, there is a greater revelation and a more unequivocal realisation of it in the New Testament, although sometimes it is couched in different terminology.

    Q. How was an Old Testament saint saved in the past?
    A. By grace through faith.

    Q. How is a New Testament saint saved now?
    A. By grace through faith.

    The act of salvation is described in the New Testament as being “born again” a term quite alien to the Old Testament, yet an act seen constantly revealed throughout its pages. Isaiah uses similar, yet more veiled, language to the New Testament, in Isaiah 45:12-13, saying, “I have made the earth, and created man upon it: I, even my hands, have stretched out the heavens, and all their host have I commanded. I have raised him up in righteousness.”

    The determining factor that enables sinful man to secure total victory over spiritual and physical death and to enter into the first spiritual resurrection and subsequently the physical “resurrection of life” is Christ’s sinless life, His atoning death and His glorious resurrection from the death. 1 John 2:29 declares, “Everyone that doeth righteousness is born of him.”
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2020
  9. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    Please list the New Testament verses where the resurrection being spoken of is not referring to a bodily resurrection.
     
  10. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    I have and you have carefully ignored them. This is why so many are abandoning Premil. It cannot abide the scrutiny of ALL Scripture. Your continual avoidance does nothing to advance your cause.
     
  11. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    Two resurrections result for the believer from Christ’s one resurrection. Man need spiritually redeemed and physically redeemed. When one gets saved they are spiritually redeemed. But they are not physically redeemed until resurrection day. Jesus “first resurrection” secured both resurrections for those who will put their faith in Christ.

    Jesus said in John 5:24-29, referring to these two different, yet inextricably linked, resurrections, “Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. Verily, verily, I say unto you, The hour is coming, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live (speaking of our spiritual resurrection in Christ). For as the Father hath life in himself; so hath he given to the Son to have life in himself; And hath given him authority to execute judgment also, because he is the Son of man. Marvel not at this: for the hour is coming, in the which all that are in the graves shall hear his voice, And shall come forth; they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life (speaking of the second or physical resurrection); and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation.”

    There are clearly two resurrections here:

    (1) Spiritual
    (2) Physical

    The first highlighted part here is clearly referring to the first resurrection, the spiritual resurrection. The terminology “the hour is coming, and now is” is used here and in other places to simply indicate – ‘the time is now upon us’ although it would have an immediate reality for every passing generation. The first resurrection outlined here is a spiritual resurrection pertaining solely to the elect: “the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live,” it relates to the here-and-now. The second relates to all the dead (saved and unsaved), "the hour is coming, in the which ALL that are in the graves shall hear his voice, And shall come forth." It relates to the all-consummating resurrection day. The physical resurrection is therefore not restricted to the elect alone but to “the dead.” It is they in total that hear Christ’s voice, being raised to two different destinations

    Re the first resurrection, Jesus says in John 5:24-25, “He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life.” Christ speaks here in clear language about a spiritual resurrection, when the spiritually dead would be spiritually quickened. This resurrection occurs throughout the intra-Advent period. The actual extent of “the hour” here is therefore determined by the existence of and the continuation with the occurrence outlined; i.e. ‘the new birth’ – figuratively described as “the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live.” This reading, and the figurative use of the word “hour,” is therefore advanced to describe a continued period of “salvation.”

    A similar figurative idea, and time period, is spoken of in relation to the usage of the word “day” in 2 Corinthians 6:2, which says, “behold, now is the acceptable time; behold, now is the day of salvation.” This familiar reading describes a day “time” or period of continuous salvation. We can effortlessly establish the termination point of this period by exploring the many varying and explicit passages that refer to the end of the Gospel age. In every one this “time” concludes at the all-consummating Second Advent.

    Re the second resurrection, as we have already established, whatever time-span this hour covers, and whatever actually occurs within it, must assuredly continue to happen throughout the time-span of this hour – that is the consistent usage of this figure in other Scripture. The stated occurrence must be ongoing throughout the stated period in view (however long that may be). In this case it is the resurrection of dead (both righteous and wicked).
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2020
  12. ~Cassia~

    ~Cassia~ No millstone~no fear Supporter

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    Imo the jargon that is conflicting is that only body adoption is regarded as the resurrection being waited upon .... while rebirth consists of conformation to the new nature via transformation.
     
  13. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    Yes, but also, the conformation to the new nature via transformation begins the moment a person is born again, and continues all his or her life. The same goes for being alive in Christ.

    But the bodily resurrection to come will only come when Christ returns.

    The two are 100% related. The second can only occur because of the first - and Christ is the first fruits of it all, and the author and finisher of it all.
     
  14. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, Jesus is "the first resurrection" (Acts 26:23 and Revelation 20:6), "the firstborn from the dead" (Colossians 1:18), "the firstfruits of them that slept" (1 Corinthians 15:20), "first begotten of the dead" (Revelation 1:5).
     
  15. grafted branch

    grafted branch Member Supporter

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    You didn’t mention Matthew 27:51-53 in the OP. If the first resurrection is still future, do you have to spiritualize the event in Matthew 27?
     
  16. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    That's a false assumption based on the fact that (as shown by your statements below), you have chosen to read into the Greek word anastasis a "spiritual resurrection" which none of the New Testament verses using the word refers to - they all refer to a bodily resurrection from the dead.

    I will get back to this fact again after quoting what you say about it further below.

    False.

    JESUS said we have to be born from above. He DID NOT SAY we have to be "resurrected". Neither do any of the verses talking about the resurrection talk about anything but the bodily resurrection of Christ and the coming bodily resurrection of those who are born from above, which will take place when He returns. See the verses you claim refer to a "spiritual resurrection":

    BODILY RESURRECTION

    John 6:40 (words of Christ): And this is the will of Him who sent Me, that everyone who sees the Son and believes on Him should have everlasting life. And I will raise him up at the last day.

    1 Cor 6:14 And God has both raised up the Lord, and also will raise us up by His own power.

    There is no New Testament verse where the word anastasis (resurrection) is talking about anything other than the bodily resurrection of the dead. See for example:-

    Mat 22:23; Mark 12:18; Luk 2:34; Luk 20:27; John 5:29; Acts:- 4:2; 17:18; 17:32; 23:8; 24:15; 2 Tim 2:18).

    Likewise, there is no New Testament verse speaking about being raised up from death that is not speaking of being raised up bodily - they all refer to the bodily resurrection from the dead, example:-

    Matthew:- 11:5; 16:21; 17:23; Mark:- 6:14; 14;28; Luke:- 7:22; 9:22; 20:37; John:- 12:1 & 9 & 17; Acts:- 2:24 & 32; 3:15 & 26; 4:10; 5:30; 10:40; 13:30 & 34 & 37; Romans:- 4:24 & 25; 6:4 &9; 7:4; 8:11 & 34; 10:9; 1 Cor 6:14; 1 Cor 15:12-17 & 29 & 32 & 35 & 42-44 & 52-54; Gal 1:1; 1 Thess 1:10; 2 Tim 2:8; 1 Pet 1:21; Rev 1:18.

    Romans 8
    10 and if Christ is in you, the body, indeed, is dead because of sin, and the Spirit is life because of righteousness,
    11 But if the Spirit of the One who raised up Jesus from the dead dwells in you, the One who raised up Christ from the dead shall also make your mortal bodies alive by His Spirit who dwells in you.

    Born of the Spirit, as JESUS said they must. He did not call it a "resurrection" and neither does any other New Testament verse.
    Yes. The New Testament calls Christ's resurrection the firsfruits (aparche) of the resurrection.

    NOWHERE does it call it Christ's "first" (Greek protos) resurrection "spiritual birth" or equate it with the born again experience. It always refers to His bodily resurrection.

    Why do you remain determined to change the meaning of scripture "ever so slightly" to force a meaning that fits your eisegesis?

    Strongs: G536
    00536 G536 ἀπαρχή aparchē ap-ar-khay'
    From a compound of G575 and G756; a beginning of sacrifice that is the (Jewish) first fruit (figuratively): - first-fruits.
    Strongs: απαρχη
    Morphology: N-NSF

    But the rest of the dead lived not again until the thousand years were finished. This is the first (protos) resurrection.

    Strongs: G4413
    04413 G4413 πρῶτος prōtos pro'-tos
    Contracted superlative of G4253; foremost (in time place order or importance): - before beginning best chief (-est) first (of all) former.


    Please quote a verse where Christ's resurrection is called the "first" (protos) resurrection and the same verse equates this with the born-again experience of saints.
    No "spiritual resurrection" in that.

    The first part of what you say below is true, but the second part which I've highlighted in bold, is totally devoid of truth and is merely what you have read into the verses:
    The words are not equated to the birth from above which Jesus called birth in ANY of the verses (I refer you to my OP).

    That is your sandy foundation for your "spiritual resurrection" castle-of-sand, which you have built on the sea's side of the high-tide mark. The above is a totally FALSE statement that the verses which talk about resurrection and being raised from death and which use the words anastasis and egeiro, equate this with the a supposed "spiritual resurrection" and hence "new birth".

    They are all talking only about the bodily resurrection from the dead - not about the new birth experience (which is the prerequisite of the bodily resurrection). Everything else you say is your castle of sand based on the same sandy foundation on the sea's side of the high tide mark.

    You may think that making your posts so long might make what you claim "true", but you're bluffing yourself.

    I've had to edit this because your machine-gunning made me insert a lot of statements at first which were typos. Jesus is the first resurrection and the firsfruits of the resurrection but the Bible does not equate the verses talking about His resurrection with any "spiritual" resurrection of saints. It's always referring to a bodily resurrection.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2020
  17. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    No. Rev 20:6 and Acts 26:23 are not the same resurrection.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2020
  18. Fullness of the Gentiles

    Fullness of the Gentiles One nation in Christ Supporter

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    I refer you to my post #16 where I prove that what you say is based on a sandy foundation which is your false assumption regarding your imagined "spiritual" resurrection.

    Please go back to post #16 which answers this.
     
  19. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    Denying what the inspired text says does not negate the reality of the fact. You seem to think: if you repeat this enough someone will actually believe you. That is not the way it works! The above texts that have been submitted speak about the believer being raised from death to life by way of spiritual resurrection. We are shown to be buried with Christ in death, and resurrected in the likeness of His glorious resurrection into newness of life. This couldn't be clearer. This is a spiritual reality! Being raised from the grave of our sin and being born from above are 2 analogies that describe the same supernatural spiritual experience.



    Acts 26:23 presents Christ’s physical resurrection as the first resurrection, saying, “Christ should suffer, and that He should be the first resurrection from the dead, and should shew light unto the people, and to the Gentiles."

    Colossians 1:18 closely mirrors Acts 26:23, saying, “And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence.”

    Revelation 1:5 uses the same Greek word to describe Christ’s triumphant resurrection, saying, “Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, and the first begotten of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth.”

    Paul similarly says in 1 Corinthians 15:20, “now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the firstfruits of them that slept.”

    Revelation 20:6 simply says, “Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first resurrection: on such the second death hath no power.”

    This is evidence! This is corroboration!

    Again, your evidence is personal opinion. This is not evidence! This is just personal opinion. You attack the multiple Amil proof-texts, but do you have one to prove your theory?

    What Scripture, if any, do you consider definitely corroborates the Premillennial interpretation of Revelation 20 that there are two distinct physical resurrection days (the first for the righteous, the second for the wicked) separated by a literal 1000 years+?
     
  20. sovereigngrace

    sovereigngrace Well-Known Member

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    That post is just full of personal opinion.
     
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