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Featured Must Confession be Catholic?

Discussion in 'General Theology' started by Tree of Life, Dec 7, 2017.

  1. Rick Otto

    Rick Otto The Dude Abides

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    It's an illegitimate authority being exercised.
    People confess their sins to each other and or God, routinely, if not ritually... ya get my drift?
    I don't disagree that pastors and ministers should be available and ready for that.
     
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  2. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    General confession and absolution begins at the beginning of the service, usually before the entrance hymn or immediately afterwards. Similar to the Roman Mass.

    Pastors can always hear individual confessions privately, and provide spiritual counselling and advice as well. It's very similar to the Catholic practice, though our theology differs. It is traditional among some Lutherans to give a first confession around the time of first communion or Confirmation.

    In my pastors conservative LCMS church growing up, confession was required once a month to be a member in good standing. That was normal at some Lutheran churches, though practices differed, at one time. Now days, private confession is rarer, but the rite is still retained.
     
  3. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    BTW, in the Lutheran church, there is no reason one cannot receive communion without confession, though there might be extenuating circumstances where one should confess their sins privately first, such as perhaps rejecting the faith altogether, or other extreme sins. We believe communion itself gives us assurance of the forgiveness of sins, it is a means of grace. It is just the Gospel being applied to us, either one does the same thing when it is faithfully received, it gives us Jesus present through his Word.

    Luther considered absolution a sacrament and wished it to be retained, so it was, though some Lutherans quibble over its status as a sacrament, none disparrages it. It is a blessing if it is done right and for the right reasons.
     
  4. HereIStand

    HereIStand Regular Member Supporter

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    Having been LCMS, I at times felt the absolution part of the service to be a little jarring. There were different wordings for it. The "your sins are forgiven" wording felt more like a proclamation of forgiveness. But the "I forgive you" felt more like a granting of forgiveness. Hence, it felt more uncomfortable.
     
  5. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I actually like the "I forgive you" part, because it's an active tense rather than passive tense. The pastor always makes it clear by what authority he is forgiving- it's in the name of Jesus.

    Nontheless, usually the rites we use in the ELCA are passive tense and just declare your sins are forgiven. Either way is fine.
     
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  6. ~Cassia~

    ~Cassia~ Devoted to Truth Supporter

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    Well that is what Jesus got killed for, likening oneself to God. They knew that only God could forgive sins.
    Confession of an alliance to Christ is the main thrust of the term in the NT.
     
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  7. Tom Farebrother

    Tom Farebrother Optimistic sceptic Supporter

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    Going off topic a bit here but how does a person go about choosing a spiritual father in the Orthodox Church? I’m asking because that kind of makes sense of something someone Orthodox told me about their having a spiritual mentor within the church.
     
  8. Goatee

    Goatee Jesus, please forgive me, a sinner.

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    That's you own personal view. Very much skewed!
     
  9. Tom Farebrother

    Tom Farebrother Optimistic sceptic Supporter

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    I think it’s important to have a strong personal relationship with the person you confess your sins to
     
  10. Goatee

    Goatee Jesus, please forgive me, a sinner.

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    Lutheran, as we know, is a new 'religion'
     
  11. Halbhh

    Halbhh The wonder and awe of His Creation! Supporter

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    Yes, we are told to confess our sins to one another (or to those mature enough not to condemn us) in the epistle of James (chapter 5). John writes in 1 John chapter 1, "8 If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. 9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness."

    So, confession is a necessary thing for all Christians to do at least at times. We should not think of it as an extra, but instead as a necessary.

    Of course a pastor can be quite helpful for many that need to confess, to help them do it in real contrition.

    To confess sincerely.

    But if you are able to confess sincerely with true contrition directly to God in your heart (that is, inside), then this real confession/repentance results in forgiveness. So this is of immediate use to those that don't already have a pastor or elder they feel they can confess to now.

    The prayer of a truly believing mature Christian brother or sister is helpful to us, and this is one reason why we should consider if we have an opportunity to confess to another believer who is mature.
     
  12. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We're just catholic without the pope and all the guilt.
     
  13. Goatee

    Goatee Jesus, please forgive me, a sinner.

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    No guilt here
     
  14. Mary of Bethany

    Mary of Bethany Only one thing is needful. Supporter

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    For most of us, our priest is our confessor or spiritual father. It is our priest who has gotten to know us and know the sins we struggle with, and so can best counsel us. Some people have monastics as a spiritual father or mother. Priests have other, usually older priests as confessors. Everyone, layperson, priest, bishop, monastic - has someone to whom they confess and receive counsel.

    Mary
     
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  15. FireDragon76

    FireDragon76 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I said many, not all, or even most. The Catholics that leave mass halfway immediately after they receive communion don't exactly refute a mechanist view of the sacraments.

    Lutherans do have different attitudes about the sacraments, we don't regard them as being completely discrete things, ex opere operato. They are all the Word applied to us. Receiveing communion then skipping town would be as strange to us and putting on your shirt and not your pants. Maybe you do it an emergency, but otherwise it's tasteless.
     
  16. Goatee

    Goatee Jesus, please forgive me, a sinner.

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    Your own personal view!
     
  17. FenderTL5

    FenderTL5 Well-Known Member

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    When I came into the church (Chrismation 2015), working with the parish priest during catechism, I was introduced the the older gentleman who would be my mentor.
    I know there are members of our parish who have a spiritual father in nearby monasteries and they will make their confession there. I'm unsure of how that process works. Our priest has mentioned, on several occasions, that he has a spiritual father that he makes regular confession in the presence of.
    I still make my Confession in the presence of our parish Priest (confession is to God, not the priest). Unfortunately for me, my mentor has since passed away and I turn to several elders in the church for advice as well as the priest.
     
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  18. Apologetic_Warrior

    Apologetic_Warrior Well-Known Member

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    Most evangelicals see confession as either or, when it's both and in Scripture.

    (Jas 5:16 [ESV]) "Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working."

    Apostates, religious hypocrites, and unbelievers in the Church have made the practice of confession to one another undesirable to say the least. People lie, and use knowledge to damage other people. Most of us would rather avoid the shame, embarrassment, judgmental attitudes, and harassment altogether.

    For me, I suppose you could say my Christian mother is my Catholic priestess, she knows more about my past sins than anybody in the world. I know her and trust her, I know she loves me and means me no harm.
     
  19. Goatee

    Goatee Jesus, please forgive me, a sinner.

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    To confess to a priest, is to confess to God. It is an amazing experience
     
  20. Rick Otto

    Rick Otto The Dude Abides

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    Not to disagree with you, but I remember the 'mechanistic view' being predominate in my RC experience. I accepted it as normal, as I accepted the general view that I wasn't normal.
    A lot of people hold that 'view' without being conscious of it. In fact, most are in denial of it.

    I'm also not offering this observation as comment on relative worth of any sect or denomination.
     
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