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Is Halloween evil sinful

Discussion in 'General Theology' started by AgapeBible, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. bèlla

    bèlla ❤️ Supporter

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    We celebrate major Jewish holidays. I don't acknowledge Halloween, Christmas or Easter. I make allowances for gatherings for the sake of older relatives. But they're treated as normal days in our home. I view this as a matter of personal conviction and not a topic for debate.

    Yours in His Service,

    ~Bella
     
  2. Pipiripi

    Pipiripi Member

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    Dressing in evil clothes, in death body, scary people, dress in Satan and spirit. Do you honor God with those dress? Is that festival written in the Bible? One we can serve God or Satan.
     
  3. ViaCrucis

    ViaCrucis Evangelical Catholic of the Augsburg Confession

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    It doesn't.

    Pentecost was the Greek name for Shavu'ot or Feast of Weeks, one of the three Jewish high holy days which God commanded the Jews to gather together in Jerusalem--which is why we read in Acts ch. 2 that there were Jews from many different places in Jerusalem. In Christianity Pentecost became the celebration of that, of God pouring out the Spirit on all flesh and the inauguration of the Church's mission in the world.

    On the Christian calendar Pentecost is fifty days (specifically the seventh Sunday) after Holy Pascha, or Easter in English, the Feast of Christ's Holy Resurrection.

    However, rather than actually bother to study anything, some Christians have grown completely comfortable believing easily disproven lies about their own holy days. Days which we have historically observed in honor of Jesus Christ.

    Christmas has no pagan origins.
    Easter has no pagan origins.
    Pentecost has no pagan origins.
    All Saints Day (and thus Halloween) has no pagan origins.
    The season of Lent has no pagan origins.
    The season of Advent has no pagan origins.

    What they all do have is emphatically and explicitly Christian origins.

    In the Western Church the year can be thought of as beginning and ending in Advent.

    The season of Advent is the beginning of the year in that it observes the hope of the ancient prophets of the coming of the Messiah. It is a season of hopeful expectation as we prepare ourselves for the Feast and season of Christmas.

    Christmas, of course, is the Feast of the Holy Nativity of Jesus Christ our Lord, the day which we celebrate the birth of the Son of God in the world, the Incarnation, God has become flesh, our Salvation has been born of the virgin. The season of Christmas lasts twelve days, with Christmas Day as the first day of Christmas, and January 5th being the 12th day of Christmas.

    January 6th is the Feast of Epiphany, and is broadly themed around the manifestation of Christ's messianic mission, most central is His baptism in the Jordan by John the Baptist. But it also includes the visit of the magi from the east who bring him gifts of frankincense, myrrh, and gold.

    The season of Epiphany is followed by the season of Lent, which begins on Ash Wednesday. It is called Ash Wednesday because traditionally Christians begin the period of fasting and repentance of Lent by receiving ashes on our forehead, a biblical sign of contrition and repentance. The season of Lent covers a period of 40 days, corresponding to the 40 days Christ was fasting in the wilderness after His baptism in the river, where He was tempted by the devil. In the West we exclude Sundays from the fast because Sundays are days of celebration, not days of fasting--Christ rose on Sunday and so every Sunday is itself a kind of little Easter.

    The final week of Lent is known as Holy Week, and begins on Palm Sunday, the day of Christ's triumphant entry into Jerusalem, where the people sang Hosanna and placed palm leaves down before Him. The Thursday of Holy Week is known as Maundy Thursday (maundy comes from the Latin word mandatum, "mandate" or "command"), the day Christ washed His disciples' feet, instituted Holy Communion, and on which night our Lord was betrayed by Judas and arrested. Good Friday, from the older English meaning of "God's Friday"; the day on which our precious Lord, the Lamb of God Himself, was crucified, died, and was buried.

    Holy Pascha, the Feast of Feasts, or Easter Sunday is the day our Lord Jesus rose victorious from the grave. The word "pascha" is Greek, it comes from the Hebrew word Pesach ("Passover"). The word "Easter" and the German "Ostern" are unique among the world languages, in most languages this great and holy day is known as Pascha or some variation. Such as Danish Påske, Dutch Pasen, French Pâques, Welsh Pasg, Hawaiian Pakoa, Indonesian Paskah, Portuguese Páscoa, and so on and so forth.

    The 40th day after Pascha is the Feast of the Ascension.

    The 50th day, or specifically 7th Sunday after Pascha is Pentecost Sunday.

    Following Pentecost days are generally counted, the nth Sunday after Pentecost, and so this period is often called Ordinary Time (because the days are counted by their ordinals, 4th, 5th, 6th, etc). This is also occasionally called Kingdomtide in some churches, as it is the time between the birth of the Church and Christ's return, and so it highlights our right now. As we as the Church are in the world.

    And then Advent happens again, and it acts as a kind of end of the year because it points to our hope and expectation right now of the Lord's glorious return, when He comes to judge the living and the dead and bring with Him His everlasting kingdom.

    That's the Christian Year in the West. And as can be plainly seen there is nothing pagan whatsoever with any of it.

    -CryptoLutheran
     
  4. coffee4u

    coffee4u Well-Known Member

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    Luckily for me it isn't much of a thing here in Australia. For one is Spring, and secondly, it is mostly an American and UK thing. Wrong time of year for pumpkins and I've never even tasted pumpkin pie. :scratch:
    I have never seen a trick or treater my entire life either. If it ever became popular here I wouldn't know what to do about them. Hand out tracts? Give them some sweets wrapped in a Bible verse? I haven't had to think about it.

    Why does dressing up have to only be done on Halloween? Can't you all dress up and eat lollies any time of the year?

    How about celebrating harvest instead? I've heard of churches doing that.

    If all of you Americans didn't talk about it, Halloween would pass me by without nary a thought. ^_^
     
  5. NoNameNothing

    NoNameNothing New Member

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  6. NoNameNothing

    NoNameNothing New Member

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    I don't Believe that at all.
     
  7. ViaCrucis

    ViaCrucis Evangelical Catholic of the Augsburg Confession

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    All Saints Day and Samhain have nothing to do with one another. All Saints Day is a Christian feast day that, on the Western Christian calendar occurs on November 1st.

    What about Samhain? Here's the biggest problem we have, the ancient Celtic pagans didn't leave much in the form of records. The Coligny Calendar from ancient Gaul is helpful, and while it mentions the "summer month" or "Samonios" which is etymologically connected with Samhain (probably), it does not mention a celebration called Samhain.

    By the time we start getting anything in writing it has already been hundreds of years since Ireland had been converted to Christianity; those that were writing down Irish legends and folklore weren't pagan, they were primarily Christian monks.

    As such our best sources for pre-Christian Irish paganism are Christian stories told hundreds of years later.

    Okay, so what can we glean from these Christian legends and stories from Ireland?

    Well, apparently Samhain was one of the four quarter-days of the year, and which marked a time of harvest and the bringing down of the pastoral animals from the highlands to the lowlands for the winter. Feasting, drinking, and bonfires were part of the feasting. The legends also speak of the wall between this world and the fairy world thinning, and so one could possibly see a fairy more easily around this time (is this a good time to mention that we are dealing with literal fairy tales here?).

    Beyond this literally everything I can find seems to go back to the work of 19th century authors such as James Frazier and his work The Golden Bough, and like many works of comparative religion from the 19th century it is more speculation than substance. It is precisely these early, and very poor, works of comparative religion from the 19th century that so many of the common modern myths originate.

    Christ Mythicism is one example of this, and Frazier's work is one of the influences on the Christ Myth "theory".

    But repeat and repeat and repeat the same thing over and over, and people accept it as fact.

    But the actual fact is that we have incredibly little--next to nothing--aside from late medieval Irish legends to go off of. And virtually all connections made between Samhain and Halloween are pure conjecture, without substance.

    I realize I am repeating myself every year with these posts. And I hope it isn't pointless. I hope some people are benefiting from having misconceptions corrected.

    Halloween is not pagan. It never was. It never had anything to do with anything pagan whatsoever.

    Just because something is popularly believed does not make it true.

    -CryptoLutheran
     
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  8. Bible Highlighter

    Bible Highlighter Law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul. Supporter

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    Walk into any CVS and they have statues of witches and or skulls, etc. because of Halloween. I think that after a person commits their life to following Jesus, these kinds of things are simply repulsive and or a promotion of pure evil. Halloween is about a glorification of evil things, not sure what fellowship light has with darkness. But of course there are many believers today who do not have a problem with Halloween. This does not make the holiday right, though. Christians can do all sorts of bad things and it does not mean that what they are doing is right. My encouragement is for you to look to Scripture and to follow Jesus, and do not follow the practices of the Gentiles.
     
  9. Archivist

    Archivist Senior Veteran Supporter

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    So you don’t hand out candy to little kids on Jalloween?
     
  10. Bible Highlighter

    Bible Highlighter Law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul. Supporter

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    It's Halloween and not Jalloween. Anyways, Halloween is more than the one thing you describe here. It's ultimately a glorification of evil because of the decorating of evil things, and the dressing up in evil things, and the watching of horror movies, and trying to scare people with evil things, etc. I should not even have to tell you this. It's kind of obvious that Halloween glorifies darkness and not God. But you are free to pick and choose that which you want to see.
     
  11. Archivist

    Archivist Senior Veteran Supporter

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    So sorry. I'm not perfect at spelling, particularly on a cell phone.

    I see Halloween as a chance to hand out candy to neighborhood kids. Most of the trick-or-treaters I see are not dressed as "evil things." They just want candy. It is a chance to meet them and their parents. I don't watch horror movies so I don't see that as part of Halloween. One neighbor has a scarecrow in front of her house, several have black and orange wreaths, one as a large spiderweb, but I don't see any of that as particularly scary or evil.

    You didn't answer my question.
     
  12. nolidad

    nolidad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well it is still teh high holy day for black satanists and black witchcraft practicioners, and black magic. I do not mean skin color but the dark arts .

    Halloween for the most part is just for kids to get free candy to the average person. But it is still practiced for the evil festival it is by many!

    I am more concerned by the subtle indoctrination caused by the horror films and even the gentle and well produced films like the Harry Potter series which promotes the use of magic as a very positive thing!
     
  13. Archivist

    Archivist Senior Veteran Supporter

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    It is also All Hallow's Eve, a Christian holiday.

    But I don't see the kids collecting candy in my neighborhood doing anything evil.

    As I have said multiple times, I generally don't watch horror films. I enjoyed the Harry Potter books and movies, but you are certainly free to avoid them.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2020
  14. Biltong65

    Biltong65 New Member

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    Did you ever consider that all of the Hallowe'en stuff you are talking about is simply a manifestation of "perverted" Christianity?

    "Scary" teens who think they are "edgy"?
     
  15. Isilwen

    Isilwen Well-Known Member

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    Up in at least South-east PA the night before Halloween is where some mischief happens. It is aptly named mischief night. I participated a couple of years. Most of it was just knocking on doors and running or knock-knock zoom-zoom is what we called it.
     
  16. Archivist

    Archivist Senior Veteran Supporter

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    We regularly had trees toilet papered in southcentral Pennsylvania, but that usually had more to do with high school band. The band members would pick their favorite band parent every week during marching band and tp trees at his/her house.
     
  17. Isilwen

    Isilwen Well-Known Member

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    The scariest thing I think I wore when I was trick or treating as a kid was in school I had a homemade Ghostbusters outfit complete with proton pack and then that night I added an old man's mask and was a retired Ghosbuster.

    When I became an EMT, I had a built-in costume with my uniform.

    Found this at the Renaissance Faire this year before Covid-19 shut stuff down. My girlfriend got a dress that was inspired by Tiana from the Princess and the Frog movie and we thought this would match nicely!

    IMG_20200229_175653.jpg
     
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  18. Isilwen

    Isilwen Well-Known Member

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    Plenty of trees and houses had TP as well, mostly favorite teachers or maybe not so favorite teachers... lol.
     
  19. NerdGirl

    NerdGirl The untamed daughter

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    Eh. I think it depends on a lot of factors.

    "Halloween" encompasses an enormous variety of activities, beliefs, events, and media.

    I happen to enjoy what might be called the macabre and the spooky. A foggy forest at night, owls hooting, leaves rustling, a creaky old house with mysterious lights in the windows. I enjoy those things because they stoke my imagination, and I tend to be a rather somber, introspective sort of soul. I am not a fan of blood, gore, or overtly "horror" themes.

    As far as things like black cats and witches, I would encourage you to educate yourself rather than listen to rumors and old wives' tales.

    You said you've never told anyone "till now" that you like cats? Why wouldn't you have told anyone this? How old are you?
     
  20. NerdGirl

    NerdGirl The untamed daughter

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    Be careful with how we define "the world or the things in the world". Or soon you'll be saying you can't love chocolate cake, fireworks, swimming, parades, puppies, grand pieces of art, classical music, or any other completely innocuous and enjoyable thing that is "in the world" but not overtly religious.
     
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