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Featured I am not attached to any Church now

Discussion in 'Christian Advice' started by Jesus_is_Saint, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. Jesus_is_Saint

    Jesus_is_Saint Well-Known Member

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    I am not attached to any Church now, I was baptized in a Baptist Church in 1992, but I had left that Church long time ago.
    I joined several churches after that and became member, but left also due to split of church.

    Now, I did not join any church, I did not do Sunday service every Sunday, only sometimes.

    Is it a Must for a Christian to join a Church?

    Is that a problem to my spirituality?
     
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  2. com7fy8

    com7fy8 Well-Known Member Supporter

    +3,386
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    First, I would say, if you had good relationships in the Baptist church that you left, it would be good to keep sharing with the people you found to be genuinely Christian. And see where they went. But at least keep in touch, maybe have a home group, pray together, talk on the phone . . . something.

    And, now, even if you did not continue beneficial relationships, you can find people who are good Christian examples, who help you. Then see where they go to church. Or, visit a church and see if you discover ones who are sound people in God's love and who help you get more with God and more into loving any and all people the way Jesus wants.

    So, then, of course you don't want ones who are just nice and friendly, but who help you get real correction to live how the Bible says to submit to God and love.

    But, then, I would say do not judge a group or church only by what wrong people are doing, but see if there are ones truly gentle and humble . . . including mature senior examples. Ones younger might be able to do some good, but we need our mature senior examples of the faith and how to relate in love.

    Also, by the way, you might visit the ministries for children and younger people, and see who is ministering there. My opinion is we need to have our mature people with younger people, not only babysitters.

    And if you find you believe in what maturely Christian people are doing in a church, join them in their vision and hope. Yes, there may be even leaders who are not with it, not mature, even wrong, but there can be the really exemplary people in the same church . . . ones who have hope for any and all others, who do not give up on ones less mature and who even are wrong > love "hopes all things" (in 1 Corinthians 13:7). You need people like this, who don't quit; they can help you get ready for marriage, or to do better in marriage.
     
  3. Yennora

    Yennora Buy the truth and sell it not. Pro 23:23

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    *I copied this reply from the other thread in the Catholic forums to here :)

    Hi! I just saw your last thread too.

    I was once an Orthodox and now I'm non-denominational. Of course I cannot live without having the Holy Communion so I attend the liturgy in a Coptic Orthodox church. The priest knows I'm non-denominational but he is extremely friendly to me and very accepting.

    I also took the Holy Communion in Catholic churches too and I still felt the grace of God. No one turned us away.

    There was that time when I was rejected confession by a Catholic priest but he was willing to listen to my problems so yeah..

    I believe it is fine not to attend church and only live with a personal relationship with God. I only attend churches for the Holy Communion (which is crucial to keep me spiritually protected). Other than that, I'm not a church person anymore. (And I still see God's grace in my life)
     
  4. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    How do you propose to do what the Bible calls on us to do without having a church--receive the Lord's Supper, for one example?
     
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  5. Tolworth John

    Tolworth John Well-Known Member

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    Why don't you want to meet with other Christians, to encourage them, be encouraged and challenged through corporate worship and the sermon?

    What is more important than worshipping the God you love?
     
  6. ~Zao~

    ~Zao~ Great is Thy Faithfulness Supporter

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    The church is much like a training ground for carrying the commission to the world. It’s not walking away from worshipping God to walk away from the church. The difference should be obvious since you just sourced worship based on that.
     
  7. LaBèlla

    LaBèlla ❣️ His little lady ❣️ Supporter

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    Was your decision well supported?
     
  8. Redwingfan9

    Redwingfan9 Active Member

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    Scripture implies that we are members of a corporate body, a local church. There are men called to be elders and deacons, who will they be ruling and serving if believers can't be bothered to come to church? How can believers participate in the sacraments of baptism and communion without a church body? How can believers worship God in the way proscribed in scripture without a church?

    To me the real question is this: why would any believer not want to be part of the church? I understand the reluctance of people who have been mistreated by the church. Believe me, my family and I have been victims of spiritual abuse that we are still recovering from. Despite all of that, we want to be under the authority of a Bible believing church and while sometimes it's difficult to go on Sunday morning, we understand we are there to worship God. I don't know what your deal is of course but if you just simply don't feel like fellowshiping with other believers and worshiping God corporately then yes, I would consider that a significant spiritual problem. What's the point of Christ ordaining the church universal if the sheep are hiding at home on Sunday?
     
  9. LaBèlla

    LaBèlla ❣️ His little lady ❣️ Supporter

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    Who isn’t the question at hand. Why is more important. Why are they leaving? This is happening across denominations and age groups.

    How do persecuted Christians do it? Or those imprisoned? Your relationship with God doesn’t diminish because of your circumstances unless you permit it to. You hold on to His unchanging hand and keep walking.
     
  10. Yennora

    Yennora Buy the truth and sell it not. Pro 23:23

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    You mean by our priest? He never supported me in my choice to be non-denominational nor in my lack of frequent attendance. But he was always a good listener and he gave advice. Which is what I love about him, he never gets pushy and he loves to listen. He usually would love it if I show up more frequently, I don't though.

    However, I'm pretty sure that if my actions were really harmful (to me or to others) he would have really got serious about it since he cares about me.

    I still have fellowship here on CF and I enjoy being surrounded by like minded people a lot. I'm sure that CF was a powerful factor in my spiritual growth.

    Hence, I'm satisfied with attending liturgy for the Holy Communion every <= 40 days and having the actual fellowship here at the moment.
     
  11. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    Yes, but there is a huge difference between someone who doesn't attend church because it is impossible to do or nearly so...and someone who simply chooses not to attend although he could.

    And of course, people who are unable to attend church are also unable to receive the sacraments, at least the one that is the most commonly received under normal circumstances--the Lord's Supper.
     
  12. Redwingfan9

    Redwingfan9 Active Member

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    You and I live in the United States where we don't have to fear attending church on Sunday. This is not North Korea, we don't have to hide our faith. In our case, our faith does diminish if we do not hear the preaching of God's word each week. It diminishes because we are violating God's word and not worshipping him as he commands. We can look historically at the persecuted church and see that God strengthens believers even when they must hide. We can also look historically at what happens when people abandon the church even when it is safe to worship publicly. It leads to apostasy and lack of faith.

    Why are people leaving the church in America today? It begins with spiritual declension in society and in the church. The church as a whole doesn't stand for very much anymore. Evangelical churches have abandoned teaching for new marketing gimmicks and eventually people get tired of it and leave. I think though there's a broader societal problem, basically we're seeing the warning of Romans 1:18-32 being played out before our eyes. It's affecting the church, which has failed to adequately stand up to the social gospel for a century and who today fails to stand up to the social justice crowd in any meaningful way. When the church does try to stand up against evil, people leave because they've adopted the world's views of good and evil. It all begins though with adequate teaching from the church in the first place, which is woefully lacking.
     
  13. LaBèlla

    LaBèlla ❣️ His little lady ❣️ Supporter

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    It doesn’t change the question. The why remains unknown.
     
  14. ~Zao~

    ~Zao~ Great is Thy Faithfulness Supporter

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    I have to disagree again that leaving church is leaving the Father and His word. (therefore outside of the Father) Anyone who gets an hour a week of instructions from whoever the preacher is cannot be consciously better equipped than someone else who stays home and is immersed in His Word. That’s just not common sense.
     
  15. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    duplicate
     
  16. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    Reading the posts from Jesus-is-Saint explains his situation.

    We do not need to speculate on him being in circumstances at odds with what we were told by him--certainly not when giving answers to his questions.
     
  17. LaBèlla

    LaBèlla ❣️ His little lady ❣️ Supporter

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    I’ve seen a lot of busyness. A lot of platitudes. And many unhappy people when the masks come off.
     
  18. topher694

    topher694 Go Turtle!

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    Joining a church it is not a must to be saved or have a relationship with God or to hear His voice or anything like that.

    However, I do believe forsaking attending a church ultimately limits our growth. There is something about being around people of like minded faith that pushes us and challenges us in good ways. Of course this can vary from church to church (And I'm talking about healthy churches), and people are messy sometimes (most of the time) but life is messy so even in that we have the opportunity to learn and grow.

    Additionally there is a type of spiritual protection that comes from being in fellowship. We can look out for one another, pray for one another, see things in each other that we can see in ourselves. All of that can help protect us. My mentor says it this way, "The banana separated from the bunch is the one that gets peeled and eaten"
     
  19. LaBèlla

    LaBèlla ❣️ His little lady ❣️ Supporter

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    I didn’t expect that but hoped people were kind and loving nonetheless.

    I went through something similar. I didn’t want to go anymore. I didn’t know why. My prayer life was unchanged. I still felt close to the Lord. But I didn’t want to go to church and I told Him.

    One day I realized I needed to understand the reason. I couldn’t address it without insight. It wasn’t a bad experience. But I think burnout was a part of it and the absence of meaningful intimacy. I was surrounded by familiar strangers.

    I met with someone last summer. We had an amazing conversation. The openness and sharing was incredible. We really connected. And the difference in our dialogue was listening. She really listened to me and encouraged my calling.

    We discussed my relationship with the Lord and where I stood. She didn’t push or try to craft a copy of herself. Or tell me how to feel or think. She met me where I was at that moment. And that was powerful.

    That was the problem. I wasn’t in an environment where I could be heard. The should’s had taken a toll. The scripts and pressure to conform to ideas and behaviors that had no biblical foundation had run its course. I can’t thrive in that setting.
     
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  20. LaBèlla

    LaBèlla ❣️ His little lady ❣️ Supporter

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    I wasn’t addressing the OP in that statement but the larger issue of departure. :)
     
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