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How Many Languages Do You Speak?

Discussion in 'Announcements' started by Brent W, Apr 5, 2017.

  1. 1

    19 vote(s)
    31.7%
  2. 2

    22 vote(s)
    36.7%
  3. 3

    8 vote(s)
    13.3%
  4. 4

    4 vote(s)
    6.7%
  5. 5+

    7 vote(s)
    11.7%
  1. Aspzan

    Aspzan Well-Known Member Supporter

    615
    +485
    United Kingdom
    Christian
    Single
    I only speak English but I'm hoping to learn Greek.

    Do the people here who speak multiple languages have any language learning advice?
     
  2. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +12,391
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Nothing beats practice with native speakers. See if you can find a conversation group or the like.
     
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  3. A Realist

    A Realist Living in Reality

    726
    +735
    United States
    Christian
    Married
    Does Pig Latin count?
     
  4. New Birth

    New Birth Well-Known Member

    585
    +196
    United States
    Oneness
    Married
    I speak English and also speak in tongues.
     
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  5. All4Christ

    All4Christ ✙ The Handmaid of God Laura ✙ Supporter CF Senior Ambassador

    +6,336
    United States
    Eastern Orthodox
    Married
    I speak English, a decent amount of Italian and Spanish, though I sometimes mix them together, some Hebrew, read some koine Greek, a smattering of German (and Pennsylvania Dutch), etc. I counted that as two languages :)

    Add in computer languages - I’d be fluent in about 7 languages ;)
     
  6. Lost4words

    Lost4words In reality, an old dog! Supporter

    +3,728
    United Kingdom
    Catholic
    Single
    Mostly, i speak rubbish!
     
  7. Sabertooth

    Sabertooth Repartee Animal: Quipping the Saints! Supporter

    +2,258
    United States
    Charismatic
    Married
    US-Others
    :pigface: I think so...!
     
  8. Dave-W

    Dave-W Welcoming grandchild #7, Arturus Waggoner! Supporter

    +15,197
    United States
    Messianic
    Married
    US-Others
    How about FORTRAN, COBOL or G-Code?
     
  9. ChristianForCats

    ChristianForCats God Seeker

    +734
    United States
    Protestant
    Single
    US-Democrat
    Whern I was a girl ASL was a hobby of mine. I had an ASL diagram book called The Joy of Signing, took a weekly after-school class (not my school) in third grade, and read a book about a deaf girl. But I was only interested because it was fun, not acquainted to any deaf people, so I never became fluent. ASL would be my second language if I had to learn one.
     
  10. ChristianForCats

    ChristianForCats God Seeker

    +734
    United States
    Protestant
    Single
    US-Democrat
    I define knowing a language as being able to speak and write (or sign) in conversations, not just knowing enough words to make full sentences, because each language has its own grammar rules.
     
  11. Trixiefire

    Trixiefire New Member

    3
    +3
    United States
    Christian
    Private
    I speak Spanish and English fluently. I am working on learning Korean, and Italian and eventually another language as well I haven't decided yet.
     
  12. Hishandmaiden

    Hishandmaiden The Humble Servant Supporter

    +193
    Christian
    Private
    I speak English and Mandarin Chinese.
     
  13. Gracia Singh

    Gracia Singh Newbie Supporter

    +6,962
    United States
    Christian
    Married
    Speak, English, and a smattering of really crummy, grammatically devastating Hindi.

    Read; English, Greek, Cyrilic, Arabic, Hebrew, Japanese, Devangari, some Chinese, trying to learn Syriac and Korean.
     
  14. sunshineforJesus

    sunshineforJesus is so in love with God Supporter

    +8,640
    United States
    Pentecostal
    Single
    US-Republican
    I speak english,and also know some sign language and a little bit of spanish.
     
  15. dzheremi

    dzheremi Coptic Orthodox non-Egyptian

    +7,561
    Oriental Orthodox
    Private
    Spoken: English (native), Spanish (heritage; since c. age 4), Russian (~6 years academic training, but it was many years ago starting at age 19, and I haven't used it at all in a decade), Arabic (sorta...only took a year in college, but then picked up a bit more naturally after first coming into contact with the Coptic Orthodox Church and later converting in 2012).

    Reading: Greek, Coptic, Syriac/Neo-Aramaic (only the classical/Estrangelo script, and I've almost got Madnhaya/Eastern down, which is odd because I should really be learning Western/Serto if I want to read Syriac Orthodox books; luckily some of the material in the liturgical books I have is printed in Estrangelo, because that's the easiest to read), Ge'ez and Fidel ('Ethiopic', for the Semitic languages of Ethiopia and Eritrea, though I'm more familiar with the Ethiopian usage than the Eritrean, which as I understand varies from the Ethiopian).

    I have yet to crack Armenian. Not sure why. It's an honest to goodness alphabet, unlike these Semitic abjads/consonantal alphabets, and the strangely sort of Indian-ish Ge'ez/Fidel system.

    Oh, and I had a 10-week intensive course in Lithuanian and Proto-Indo-European in college as an undergraduate (11 years ago; yikes!), so I guess that counts. I mean, that's a Latin alphabet, and all I can remember how to actually say is "Labas!" (Hi), but by the end of those 10 weeks they had us reading the 1547 Mazyvedas Catechism (the first Lithuanian book ever printed) in the original, and we read our final papers in Lithuanian, so it probably wouldn't be too hard to jump back into. It's a very nasally language, though. I didn't really find it all that appealing at that level, though it is interesting as the Indo-European language that is supposedly closest to P.I.E. (that is, is the least modified relative to the P.I.E. root forms and hypothesized phonology).

    (Dang...now I want pie.)
     
  16. Go Braves

    Go Braves On semi-hiatus here. Y'all take care.

    +7,770
    United States
    Catholic
    In Relationship
    US-Republican
    Technically 2. English and Spanish. However on account of being fluent in Southern English & in the English the rest of y'all use around the world I think maybe I should get some credit for that. So I'll say 2.5. :)
     
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  17. Go Braves

    Go Braves On semi-hiatus here. Y'all take care.

    +7,770
    United States
    Catholic
    In Relationship
    US-Republican
    Dang, that's impressive!
     
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  18. mothcorrupteth

    mothcorrupteth Old Whig Monarchist, Classically Realpolitik

    395
    +335
    United States
    Eastern Orthodox
    Single
    US-Constitution
    English is my first language. I'm quite fluent in speaking and reading German; I watch virtually all my movies in the language since about two years ago; I first learned it in college when I was 18. Spanish is probably my third most proficient; I can understand 90% of what I read or hear, but speaking is still somewhat limited; I first learned it in high school when I was 15.

    Besides that, I have varying degrees of proficiency with a number of languages:

    Dutch: I can read and understand most of it, can speak a little; first learned it when I was 30.
    Latin: I can read it, and I've actually done a lot of amateur translation from it. I can pronounce it in the classical manner, but I can't really speak it communicatively; first learned it when I was 29.
    Modern Greek: I can read it and speak a fair bit of it; I first learned it when I was 31. I have some dubs of Disney and Pixar movies, but not a whole lot else gets dubbed into the language and I don't go to a Greek church, so my practice is limited.
    Russian: I can read it and speak a fair bit of it; the first time I tried to learn it I was 19, but I didn't really try it in depth until I was 30. This is the one I have most regular access to practicing, because a lot of Russians go to my Serbian church, and because I have a lot of Russian dubs of my favorite movies.
    Mandarin: I can speak and understand it from speech a little bit, but I cannot read or write beyond a couple characters. I first started learning it when I was about 30.
    French: I can speak and understand it as a moderate beginner, but don't ask me to spell it! I first started learning it earlier this year because I had a Haitian Creole speaker as one of my students.

    And at various times, I've dabbled in Hebrew, Icelandic, Japanese, Farsi/Persian, Italian, Brazilian Portuguese, and Swiss German. But I can't speak or read any of them reliably, just recognize words here and there at best.

    What works is different for every person, but the main thing if you want to learn to speak is to plant yourself in situations where you have to communicate in the language to get what you want.

    I have an unusual brain because I'm bipolar, and that somehow lets me learn most things very rapidly, so the other things I do may not work for you, but... I practice Pimsleur audio lessons in my languages of interest, I watch dubs of my favorite movies in the language, I read books in the language, and I seek out opportunities to practice with whomever I can. I don't know many native German speakers, so I practice with my dad, who was stationed in West Germany in the late 70's. Or I write comments on Doug Madenford's YouTube channel (he specializes in teaching PA Dutch, which is a dialect of German). I go to a church where there are lots of Russians. Just today, I was on a WWII landing craft that saw service in the Greek navy; I went on a scavenger hunt to find any and all Greek text on the ship and was not disappointed! And I didn't actually want to learn French, but because I had that Haitian student in my class, I jumped at the chance to learn the language with a native speaker. As a rule, if I know I'll be regularly interacting with a second language speaker--doesn't matter what language it is--I try to learn at least a little bit to practice with them. Not only does it usually make them very happy and win me a friend, but it also gives me strong practice that I may not be able to get again later. And especially with European languages, you'll often find that what you learn in one gives you insight into at least one of the others.
     
  19. dzheremi

    dzheremi Coptic Orthodox non-Egyptian

    +7,561
    Oriental Orthodox
    Private
    Thank you. That's very kind. The funny thing is that it is all part of my linguistics training (well, except for the Spanish and Russian, since I didn't get into linguistics until age 21 or so, after I either knew or had started these), and in that context it really isn't impressive. When I graduated from the University of Oregon in 2009 with my bachelors, part of the commencement speech was a short lesson in and questions on Telugu, a Dravidian language spoken in a few states on the eastern-central coast of India that apparently the department chair had studied, but nobody else had. Hahaha. He just wanted to have one last chance to torture us before they let us go! And I had academic advisers and such who knew weird Cariban languages of Suriname that I can't remember the names of, and Bulgarian, and Old Church Slavonic, and Polish, and Wolof, etc. It was really nuts. And that was just the undergraduate experience. :eek: Haha.
     
  20. Chadrho

    Chadrho a blind squirrel that found a nut Supporter

    424
    +411
    United States
    Christian
    Single
    US-Others
    I read Greek and Hebrew. I can barely speak English, some would say. :)
     
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