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How do believers in other faiths keep faith?

Discussion in 'Christian Philosophy & Ethics' started by Meteorim, Jun 20, 2019.

  1. Meteorim

    Meteorim New Member

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    It is said that God gives us the power/strength to believe. Or that God works faith in us and that without the work of the Holy Sprit non of us would believe.
    How does this work for other religions? For instance, there are 1 billion Mulsims who are pretty sure of their faith. How do they believe without the Holy Spirit?
     
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  2. Dave L

    Dave L Well-Known Member Supporter

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    People buy products believing the claims are true. We can call this faith. But biblical faith is different. It is a fruit of the Holy Spirit that involves recognizing the true Christ and having confidence in him as your savior. The Tares believe and look like Christians. The group Jesus will tell "depart from me, I never knew you" on the last day, fit the profile of popular religion today. So it comes down to what biblical faith is or is not.
     
  3. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    Well, there are other belief systems that produce loyal followers--politics, health regimens, non-religious philosophies of life, and so on. And of course, if ones culture and parents, everyone you know and live with, are of one view, it is easy for you to think it is the right way, too.
     
  4. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    duplicate post
     
  5. Meteorim

    Meteorim New Member

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    As a Christian, I agree with what you say. But looking from an outsider's position I see little difference. The Muslim or Hindu is experiencing faith/religion also, and often intensely. Where do we detect that the faith we hold is connected to the Holy Spirit?
     
  6. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    I am inclined to say that our faith is more supernatural and that it requires faith rather than mere cognition or compliance. But I would have to have a long talk with a practicing Hindu before I could speak with enough authority on that religion to answer you well.
     
  7. Meteorim

    Meteorim New Member

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    I understand; of course the religions mentioned are examples. Just last Sunday I heard a preacher say that without the Holy Spirit we would not even be Christians, we would not be able to keep the faith at all. The thing is that billions of non-Christian believers do. Their faith is sustained also by reading holy books or visiting religious gatherings or praying, as is ours. I'm trying to find the difference here. And if there is none, then is this statement true: God works faith in us?
     
  8. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    I think the answer may lie with the meaning of faith. Billions of people buy into one belief-system or other strictly on the basis of them liking it or finding it plausible. We are not speaking of that kind of thing. Faith, as we know, is not simply acceptance, but it is a mystical bond between God and Man that exhibits itself in a lifestyle change, trust in the Almighty, etc. etc.

    So if faith is more than belief, the intervention of the Holy Spirit makes sense. Elsewise, there would be little reason to accept as true the Bible accounts. But...one might say at this point, there are people who believe the most bizarre and unscientific things. Many cults, for instance. So the improbability of the storyline that defines the religion cannot be the test of whether faith is involved or not.

    Except that it is relatively few people who are in that category. With the world religions you have referred to, we are speaking of the proof being in the religious pudding, as it were.

    I said that I am not conversant enough with Hinduism to comment much on it, but when it comes to Islam, Buddhism, Shinto, Confucianism, and maybe a few others, we are barely speaking of religions in the Christian sense at all.

    Islam is as much a political and social way of life as it is a religion, and most of its religious concepts are borrowed from Judaism or Christianity or a pre-existing Arab paganism anyway. Buddhism, and all the rest of the religions of the East, are essentially absent a God as we know God. It is not as though they follow a competing god. These are more like philosophies that explain the meaning of life, but are not essentially theistic.

    And then this: which is the faith that has won the world? In spite of recent gains by Islam, there are far more Christians, the religion is growing even in the face of new persecutions, and it is the only faith that can be seen as universal in any practical sense of the word. And all of this is true despite it being the one most oriented towards transcendence or supernatural truth of all of them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019
  9. Meteorim

    Meteorim New Member

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    @Albion Thanks for your reply. Essentially what you say is that non-Christian faith is more 'believe', culture, political based. That is why only in Christianity we can speak of God connecting to man, through the Holy Spirit. Strictly speaking: Christianity is the only genuine faith in God.
     
  10. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    Sort of. Of course it is the religion that I affirm rather than some other. But to focus on the idea of faith, which is where we began, I am suggesting that we miss the point of faith if we fall into the habit of thinking of it as mere belief. It is more than that, and Christianity is unique in dealing with it, which suggests the involvement of the Holy Spirit. ;)
     
  11. Shempster

    Shempster ImJustMe Supporter

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    I have a good friend who is a devout Muslim. He keeps his faith more than most Christians I know.
    What is odd about him is that he does not fit the mold Christians have cast for Muslims.
    He believes in loving God and his fellow brothers and sisters. He does not judge anyone nor talk evil of anyone. He respects other peoples religions and rejects any calls to violence. He told me that most Muslims are just like this and that the radicals are few...just like in Christianity.
    He doesn't seem to have any trouble staying faithful. And he is only about 26 years old!
     
  12. Archivist

    Archivist Senior Veteran Supporter

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    I used to date a Muslim girl, and the way you describe your friend is the way I would describe she and her family.
     
  13. Shahab

    Shahab New Member

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    They don't have Holy Spirit. The purpose of the Holy Spirit is to guide Christians after Jesus ascended. That is how Christians are Jesus' body. And that is why they're saved. The other religions are not his body, they follow their book and are waiting to see what happens. And that is why they are less prosperous. God created Islam to gather muslims together and hand them over to Jesus at the end of times.
     
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