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Handling tattoo regret (poll also)

Discussion in 'Community Hangout' started by faroukfarouk, Oct 8, 2017.

Good ways to handle tattoo regret?

This poll will close on Nov 27, 2017 at 1:05 PM.
  1. Just ignoring an existing, regretted design

    30.0%
  2. Changing the design to sometimes more faith-based

    70.0%
  3. Other

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Not sure

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Complete removal of the existing design

    10.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. celestialpearl

    celestialpearl Baby Anglican

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    Well, I was a different person then. Would I have had it tattooed on me at this point in life? No. This body is temporary though. I also consider, is this anything offensive to God? I don't believe so. I do have a tattoo I'd like to modify, because my answer to the previous question is not the same.

    I had a great love of Japanese culture then, as I do now.:)

    The Meaning of Cherry Blossoms in Japan: Life, Death and Renewal
     
  2. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Interesting!

    Sounds anyway that you dislike the other tattoo a lot more than the blossom one that you have! in fact, you might not really dislike the blossom one at all.
     
  3. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    PS: So if I could ask you, did you use the traditional indigenous Asian stick and poke method to get your Japanese tattoo? or do you prefer the usual Western tattoo machine?
     
  4. celestialpearl

    celestialpearl Baby Anglican

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    Ouch! No.:) A tattoo gun. Had the option been available though, I might have considered it!
     
  5. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Well, this is very interesting! so you would have been open to the stick and poke method if you had had access to an artist with such a specialist method. (I don't know the 'proper' term for the method, but it's rather different from the Western method.)

    So I guess the fascination of the authentic indigeneity of receiving ink in that way would have been quite worth the extra pain for you, if it had been feasible?
     
  6. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Thanks to all who voted so far in the poll!

    If you have not yet voted in the poll, please vote now! :)
     
  7. SistrNChrist

    SistrNChrist Newbie

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    I'd ask an artist who specializes in modification of tattoos to change it to something more faith based if I was in that hypothetical situation, but that's just me, and I respect that your opinions may vary.
     
  8. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    SistrNChrist:

    Yes, this is an option that a lot of Christians probably exercise, right?

    For example, a Christian woman with name of a non-Christian ex-bf tattooed, might well choose to have the name changed to something more suitably faith based with good memories rather than regretful ones: e.g., 'Bill' could be changed to 'Bible', etc.
     
  9. Waddler

    Waddler Live a story worth telling well.

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    Whether a tattoo can or should be ignored, covered, modified, or removed is largely a matter of choice, the tattoo's location, quality, age, and design, among other factors. I've seen some tattoos dissolve almost completely.

    If a tattoo is of high quality, it may be harder to cover, depending on the colors, design, and location. Personally, if I had a tattoo I regretted, I'd probably let it fade before getting it covered or removed. Removal hurts (far worse than getting a tattoo, from what I'm told), and leaves a shadow of the original, though a new tattoo in its place will cover the shadow quite well.

    To avoid tattoo regret, I've heard some general advice:
    1. That portrait of that person you love probably won't turn out well. Pictures are different on paper in contrast to skin. Even if it turns out well, skin sags as it gets older, which will deform the details of the portrait.
    2. A lot of people have learned the hard way that their girlfriend's name on their arm can turn into a huge regret. Likewise, what happens if the artist misspells it? And again, skin sags.
    3. If you like a design, put it on paper and put copies where you'll see it a lot. In your room, the bathroom, your car, the office, on your computer background, your phone wallpaper, anywhere and everywhere. If you still love it after a year, it's probably a design you won't regret.
    4. Go to a henna artist and have them paint the tattoo where you want it. Pay to have it touched up as needed, for a year. Still like how it looks? Then it's probably okay.
    5. Decide how devoted you are to the meaning behind it. Don't get your loved one's name if you're not 100% certain of the relationship, and you have that person's 100% approval. Don't get that religious or political tattoo if you're not 100% sold out for that ideology. In fifty years, will it still mean something to you, if you live that long?
    6. You get what you pay for. Good work ain't cheap, and cheap work ain't good.
     
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  10. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Thanks; yes, having it changed is often the most constructive option; if the wearer becomes regretful of the message of the existing, visible tattoo, it can often be more straightforward to modify it.

    This is how parlor portfolios can be particularly useful to consult, right?
     
  11. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Yes, handling any ink regret by getting a modification of it is so often the chosen way to go. You'll be in good company, in any case, since so many tattooed Christian women choose to radiate a positive faith message through ink. (I saw these posts, FYI: )

    forums dot thewelltrainedmind dot com

    forums dot thewelltrainedmind dot com

    Clearly plenty of ppl will respect you for wanting to get a modification of what you've got in order to radiate something like a faith message instead.
     
  12. blackribbon

    blackribbon Not a newbie

    +3,692
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    I don't think the issue of career limitation related to visible tattoos has been mentioned. I work in a hospital where tattoos can not be visible. Some people have to wear bandages daily to work to cover theirs. I have seen a young man wearing a tan sleeve that is the type we use to cover IVs on the arms of people who are not oriented so that they don't pull them out. Others always wear long sleeves undershirts under their scrubs regardless of the temperature. I know professional men who can never wear short sleeves or people who will always have difficulty time getting jobs because of neck, hand, or even facial tattoos....regardless of the theme of the tattoo.
     
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  13. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Thanks for your comments.

    So I get the impression that you would not necessarily regret the idea of being tattooed per se; it's more a matter of practicality in your present job.
     
  14. blackribbon

    blackribbon Not a newbie

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    I don't have the desire to mark my skin with anything permanent. I just doen't see the purpose. I have no problem with henna but unlike earrings, you can't change a tattoo to change with you as you grow. If more earrings came in non-pierced forms, I might even object to that. I almost never wear earrings any more and my holes would probably require force to get an earring in. It is kind of weird to see SpongeBob on people my age...or very badly done tattoos from when they were drunk or young.
     
  15. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Was it you that quite a while ago mentioned about finger wedding band tattoos?

    I can see what you mean about tattoo regret taking various forms that you mention, anyway.

    I suppose you will also have cautioned your family members about the possible regret that might come as regards employment prospects, etc.

    (But I do think for example that tattoo artists can perform a very wonderful and wholesome service to mastectomy patients, which is unlikely to regretted.)
     
  16. blackribbon

    blackribbon Not a newbie

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    For most people, I see no purpose in getting a tattoo. I did say I considered getting my wedding ring tattooed on as a memorial for my husband but I never followed through. I also considered buying a widow's ring for the same purpose and didn't do it either. I didn't at the time nor now see the purpose of permanently ink your skin. You have mentioned the one area that I do see value in tattoos...and that is to put a nipple where there is no longer one or to cover scars that mentally disturb people. In reality though, I wish that as a society that we could view scars as a sign of surviving something traumatic and not as blemishes.

    Both my kids have decided against tattoos. They actually are offended by the one cousin who tattooed her ankle as a memorial to their dad and they see it more as an attention seeking action than a way to honor him.
     
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  17. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Yes, I can also see how some couples see wedding band tattoos as a kind of deep expression of marital bonding.

    Yes, I can also see how mastectomy patients can find it very reassuring to have visible nipples restored by the tattoo artist. Not so much for other ppl to see as for oneself, really.

    Some ppl in a more general sense do I think link the pain of getting a tattoo as a kind of symbol of being a survivor of life's troubles; and in this sense, if it's really meaningful it's more unlikely to be regretted, anyway.
     
  18. blackribbon

    blackribbon Not a newbie

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    It depends on what you are "surviving" because it can also tie you to that event...which would be the reason that people hide scars, they want to forget, not remember. It also depends on decisions that you make later in life. I went back to school in my 40s and was with a lot of older, non-traditional students. Our school had a "no visible tattoo" rule because most hospitals have the same rule. A lot of tattoos could and probably do limit people's opportunities later in life.
     
  19. faroukfarouk

    faroukfarouk Fading curmudgeon CF Senior Ambassador

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    Yes, I do see what you mean about institutional restraints, etc., at a school or wherever, for mature students in anticipation of work policies, and so forth.

    I'm not sure that age is completely a factor, because it's being done by all ages, frankly.

    And for example, homemakers already free from institutional, work / policy restraints are less likely to feel regrets about it, I guess. FYI, I saw this quote:

    thewelltrainedmind dot com
     
  20. blackribbon

    blackribbon Not a newbie

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    Christian
    I know exactly how many tattoos are out there. I see the ones that very few others ever see.

    As for age, I was that homemaker until my husband died and I had to re-enter the professional world. I am glad I didn't make any decisions that would have limited my choices. People are more likely to regret the tattoos that are visible in normal clothing.

    However, I do not see the purpose in permanently marking one's skin for any reason. Life changes too much.
     
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