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Eucharist In different denominations

Discussion in 'Sacramental/Ordinance Theology' started by mathinspiration, Apr 15, 2019.

  1. mathinspiration

    mathinspiration Active Member

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    How is difference in Catholic, Orthodox and different Protestant denominations?
     
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  2. MariaJLM

    MariaJLM Crazy Cat Lady

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    In the Orthodox church it's literally the body and blood of Jesus Christ. This is similar to the Catholic view except that we use leavened bread while they do not.
     
  3. HTacianas

    HTacianas Well-Known Member

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    The Catholics, Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Assyrian Churches all hold that the bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ during the blessing.
     
  4. TuxAme

    TuxAme Quis ut Deus? Supporter

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    Well, the Eastern rite uses leaven. Us Latins don't.
     
  5. TuxAme

    TuxAme Quis ut Deus? Supporter

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    Catholics understand the Eucharist to be the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ. Though the accidents (appearances) remain bread and wine, the substance does not. It is changed into Christ Himself, and the one sacrifice of Calvary is made present to us.
     
  6. Mary Meg

    Mary Meg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Following.
     
  7. Anthony2019

    Anthony2019 A work in progress. Being moulded by the Potter! Supporter

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    Anglicans generally believe in the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist, although belief ranges from a corporeal presence to a pneumatic presence.
     
  8. Jonaitis

    Jonaitis Pilgrim

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  9. Monk Brendan

    Monk Brendan Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Properly, it's Eastern CHURCHES, whether Orthodox or in communion with Rome, not rites.

    And the Armenians use unleavened bread.
     
  10. CaliforniaJosiah

    CaliforniaJosiah Well-Known Member Supporter

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    LUTHERAN...

    See Matthew 26:26-28 and 1 Corinthians 11:23-29

    Lutherans accept what the texts state. "As is."
    "Bread" = bread. Every time.
    "Wine/cup/fruit of the vine" = wine. Every time.
    "Is" = is. Every time (it has to do with reality, presence, existence)
    "Body" = body. Every time.
    "Blood" = blood. Every time.
    "Forgiveness" = forgiveness. Every time.

    That's it. That's all.
    Nothing added. Nothing deleted. No theories imposed that undermine what is stated.


    No mention of "changed" or "symbolizes" or "not" or "seems like" or "undergoing an alchemic transubstantation leaving behind an indistinquishible mixture of reality and Aristotelian Accidents." NO words are deleted or changed. No words deleted and another substituted.

    It means there IS His Body and Blood. There IS forgiveness. There also is bread and wine although for Lutherans this is insignificant and rarely mentioned (and when it is, only to distance from the medieval invention of Transubstatiation by Catholic Scholasticism).

    Catholics and Lutherans BOTH passionately embrace Real Presence. Both stress the importance and blessing of the Eucharist. Both typically celebrate it weekly. Catholics affirm their theory of Transubstantiation (since 1551 anyway) and Lutherans do not, but IMO this is not a "deal breaker." As a Lutheran, I regard the Catholic Sacrament as fully valid and I rejoice in our mutual affirmation of Christ's presence and blessing.


    Thank you.


    - Josiah
     
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  11. Andrewn

    Andrewn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Regarding the Eucharist, my understanding is that there are 4 categories of belief:

    1) Physical presence: Eastern Churches, Roman Catholics, Lutherans, Anglicans.

    2) Spiritual presence: Calvinists, Wesleyans.

    3) Symbolic ordinance: Anabaptists, Baptists, Pentecostals.

    4) Not practiced: Salvation Army.

    Personally, I prefer the 2nd category. Unfortunately, most of the denominations in that category have turned into liberal theology and cannot be trusted to teach right doctrine. Of course, the 2 groups I mentioned in the 2nd category are very different as to the "predestination" issue.
     
  12. PloverWing

    PloverWing Episcopalian

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    As I understand Anglican thought, Anglican theology doesn't specify whether the Real Presence is physical (1) or spiritual (2) -- keeping in mind, of course, that the spiritual realm is real; (2) is different from (3).

    As to liberal theology, in the US, at least, there are conservative and mainline/liberal branches of Lutheran, Anglican, and Reformed churches. (I know less about the Wesleyan groups.) Are things different in Canada -- did the Canadian churches avoid the conservative/liberal splits that the American churches went through?
     
  13. Andrewn

    Andrewn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    True, but with the intercommunion agreement with Lutherans, one has to assume that eucharistic theology is similar.


    Perhaps the liberal branches are the ones that have affiliates here! The Wesleyan / Methodist churches joined the United Church of Canada which, IMHO, is almost not Christian.
     
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  14. MarkRohfrietsch

    MarkRohfrietsch Unapologetic Apologist Supporter

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    ...or both parties don't care.

    Confessional Lutherans are not in fellowship with either the Liberal Synods of Lutheranism or the Anglican Church.
     
  15. Andrewn

    Andrewn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    So, only liberal Lutherans are in fellowship with Anglicans? This makes a big difference.
     
  16. MarkRohfrietsch

    MarkRohfrietsch Unapologetic Apologist Supporter

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    Yes.
     
  17. Radagast

    Radagast is no longer on CF Supporter

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    The Anglican Thirty-Nine Articles (no. 28) specifically rules out the Catholic view of "transubstantiation." It goes on to see "The body of Christ is given, taken, and eaten in the Supper, only after an heavenly and spiritual manner. And the mean whereby the body of Christ is received and eaten in the Supper is Faith." That certainly sounds like the spiritual view (#2) and, in fact, echoes the language of earlier Calvinist documents.

    In practice, however, many Anglicans have, over the centuries, held to some version of #1.
     
  18. PloverWing

    PloverWing Episcopalian

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    In the US, there is an agreement between the ELCA and the Episcopal Church. Conservative Lutheran groups like the LCMS and WELS and conservative breakaway Anglican groups like the ACNA are not part of that agreement. In Europe, the Porvoo Communion is an agreement between some of the European Lutheran churches and some of the European Anglican churches.

    I don't know what the situation is in Canada.

    The Lutheran churches will have to decide for themselves how much they agree on the nature of the sacraments; that isn't mine to say.
     
  19. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

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    How so?
     
  20. Andrewn

    Andrewn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Anglican Church of Canada and the ELCIC have been in full communion since 2001 and because of all the publicity, I assumed there was fellowship with all Lutherans. Now, as I recheck this, the LCC and other Confessional Lutherans are _not_ in fellowship with the ACC.
     
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