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Featured Do you think playing computer games a sin ?

Discussion in 'Christian Advice' started by Canada90, Feb 2, 2019.

  1. Canada90

    Canada90 New Member

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    So I have playstation 4 some games like sports I don't think is a sin,but i also play sometimes Grand theft Auto 5 and i feel when I play it . I often want to hit some people in a game or kill them and I feel negative if I do that although it seems as innocent games.I think its Holy Spirit that tells me it's bad. Because in a way or thoughts become reality in this game.
    But i often feel tempted to play this game ....how to fight this?
     
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  2. Artra

    Artra The unforgivable sin is not repenting

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    All sin begins in the heart. That's all you need to remember as you play these games.

    (This is coming from someone who was a gamer btw)
     
  3. Canada90

    Canada90 New Member

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    I wouldn't say i play computer games each day,but when I don't have what to do sometimes I play for few hours. But i don't spend playing each day or very much. My computer might be shutdown for months,but sometimes i have temptation to play. Not always killing people,but sometimes do that in a game,but i don't feel its right.

    But what if i in real life don't even think such things. How I would love to kill people or hit someone in real life,but only in a game i feel that.
     
  4. DZoolander

    DZoolander Persnickety Member

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  5. Canada90

    Canada90 New Member

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    What should I do if i just played it and I regret doing this in a game?
     
  6. maintenance man

    maintenance man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Find another game that you like that doesn't involve killing people.
     
  7. Hazelelponi

    Hazelelponi Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would agree, just play other games or do other things.. find a woodworking project perhaps.

    If your going through a particularly trying time read the Bible instead. As it is written, resist the devil and he will flee from you..
     
  8. Artra

    Artra The unforgivable sin is not repenting

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    I think Matthew 6:22-23 is what you're looking for.

    The eye is the lamp of the body. If your eyes are healthy, your whole body will be full of light. But if your eyes are unhealthy,your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light within you is darkness, how great is that darkness!

    You let your eyes linger on murder and violence and condone it, even if it's virtual, you allow sin to be presented to your soul, and letting any sin get close is dangerous.

    Let the Holy Spirit guide you on what games you should play. Wishing you the best :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2019
  9. dogs4thewin

    dogs4thewin dog lover Supporter CF Ambassadors

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    I play Black Hawk Down ( a shooting game) and have played call of duty. It depends on one's motive, and whether or not that game gets in the way of other things, church family work and the like.
     
  10. Ignatius the Kiwi

    Ignatius the Kiwi Newbie

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    You know, if you regret playing it you should probably put it aside for the time being.

    I personally regret the hours I've invested in playing Eu4. A fun game but it's such a time sink that I could be doing literally anything else more productive. If it bothers your conscience don't engage in it if it is not a matter of obvious sin. I don't think GTA is inherently sinful but it's violent themes and criminal themes eventually made me turn away from the series as a whole. I think the last one I played was Four and I didn't finish it.

    I don't think it's inherently sinful to play it, but if it bothers you, separate yourself from it. Plenty of other games to play.
     
  11. Canada90

    Canada90 New Member

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    I mean i don't feel bad when I play this game,only when I kill people in it hit someone... When I drive it and do nothing wrong i don't feel bad.
     
  12. AvgJoe

    AvgJoe Member since 2005 Supporter

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    Question: "Should a Christian play video games?"

    Answer:
    Completed nearly 2000 years ago, God’s Word does not explicitly teach whether or not a Christian should play video games. But the Bible’s principles still apply today regarding the best use of our time. When God shows us that a specific activity is controlling our lives, we should break away from it for a time. This “fast” could be from food, movies, TV, music, video games, anything that distracts our attention from knowing and loving God and serving His people. While some of these things may not be bad in and of themselves, they become idols if they distract us from our first love (Colossians 3:5; Revelation 2:4). Below are some principles to consider, whether the question is regarding video games, TV, movies, or any other earthly pursuit.

    1. Will video games edify or merely entertain me? To edify means to build up. Will playing video games build up your love for God, knowledge of Him, and ministry to others? “‘Everything is permissible’—but not everything is beneficial. ‘Everything is permissible’—but not everything is constructive” (1 Corinthians 10:23-24; Romans 14:19). When God gives us relaxation time, we should find uplifting activities to enjoy. Do we choose permissible over praiseworthy activities? When we have a choice between good, better, and best, we should choose the best (Galatians 5:13-17).

    2. Will playing video games obey self-will or God’s will? God’s will for His children can be summed up in His greatest commandment: “’Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind’; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself’” (Luke 10:27). Our will has been polluted by sin. Because we have been saved from our selfish desires, we should surrender our will (Philippians 3:7-9). God’s will transforms our will (Psalm 143:10). Progressively, His desires for us become our deepest desires as well.

    Many people believe the will of God is boring and humiliating. They picture a monk in a lonely monastery or a resentful church janitor. On the contrary, people who follow God’s will for their lives are the most joyful, adventurous people ever. Reading biographies of history’s heroes such Hudson Taylor, Amy Carmichael, Corrie Ten Boom, and George Mueller will verify that. Certainly, these saints faced difficulty from the world, their own flesh, and the devil. They may not have had much of this world’s possessions, but God accomplished great works through them. At first, His will seems impossible and too holy to be any fun, but God will give us the power to perform it and the desires to delight in it. “I delight to do Your will, O my God” (Psalm 40:8a; see Hebrews 13:21).

    3. Does the video game glorify God? Some video games glorify violence, lewdness, and dumb decisions (e.g., “I’m out of the race, so I’ll just wreck my car”). As Christians, our activities should bring glory to God (1 Corinthians 10:31) and help us to grow in the knowledge and grace of Christ.

    4. Will playing video games result in good works? “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them” (Ephesians 2:10; see also Titus 2:11-14 and 1 Peter 2:15). Laziness and selfishness violate God’s purpose for us—to do good works to others (1 Corinthians 15:58; see also Galatians 6:9-10).

    5. Will playing video games exhibit self-control? Many people have said that video games can become an addiction or an obsession. There is no room in the Christian life for such things. Paul compares the Christian life to an athlete disciplining his body so he may win the prize. Christians have a greater motivation to live a set-apart life of self-control—eternal reward in heaven (1 Corinthians 9:25-27).

    6. Will playing video games redeem the time? You will give account for how you use your limited minutes. Spending hours at a time playing a video game can hardly be called a good use of time. “Be very careful, then, how you live—not as unwise but as wise, making the most of every opportunity, because the days are evil. Therefore do not be foolish, but understand what the Lord's will is” (Ephesians 5:15-17). “Live for the rest of the time in the flesh no longer for human passions but for the will of God” (1 Peter 4:2; see also Colossians 4:5, James 4:14, and 1 Peter 1:14-22).

    7. Does it pass the test of Philippians 4:8? “Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things” (Philippians 4:8). When you play video games, is your mind focused on godly or secular things?

    8. Will playing video games fit in with my life purpose? Paul wrote that in the final days people would be “…lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God” (2 Timothy 3:4). Western culture fits that description. We love to play. Non-Christians become addicted to entertainment such as movies, sports, and music because they do not have a purpose higher than to enjoy life before death. These amusements cannot truly satisfy (Ecclesiastes 2:1). When Christians become addicted to the same things as non-Christians, can we truly say that we are exhibiting the new life “in a crooked and depraved generation, in which you shine like stars in the universe” (Philippians 2:15)? Or do we prove to others that we are really no different than they are and that Christ has not made a significant difference in our lives?

    Paul considered knowing, loving, and obeying God to be his highest priority. “I consider everything a loss compared to the surpassing greatness of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things. I consider them rubbish, that I may gain Christ....I want to know Christ and the power of his resurrection and the fellowship of sharing in his sufferings, becoming like him in his death,” (Philippians 3:7-10). Will playing video games be showing my love for God or my love for the things of the world? (1 John 2:15-17).

    9. Will playing video games give me an eternal focus? Christians have hope of eternal rewards in heaven if they are faithful on earth (see Matthew 6:19-21 and 1 Corinthians 3:11-16). If we focus on living for eternity rather than the passing pleasures of earth, we will have surrendered resources, time, and hearts for ministry (Colossians 3:1-2; 23-24). If our possessions or activities cause us to lose our eternal rewards, of what worth are they (Luke 12:33-37)? Christians often try to serve both God and their own desires. But Jesus clearly stated, “No one can serve two masters” (Matthew 6:24). God gives us joy through times of work and rest (Ecclesiastes 5:19; Matthew 11:28-29; Colossians 3:23-24). We must find that balance between labor and recreation. When we do set aside time for relaxation as Jesus did (Mark 6:31), we should choose an edifying activity.

    The question is not “Can I play video games?” but “Would video games be the best choice?” Will this edify me, show love to my neighbor, and glorify God? We are to pursue praiseworthy activities, not simply permissible ones. However He leads you, passionately follow Him above all else. Prepare for eternity. Every sacrifice will seem insignificant when we meet Jesus.

    www.gotquestions.org/Christian-video-games.html
     
  13. Ignatius the Kiwi

    Ignatius the Kiwi Newbie

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    Just my advice which isn't professional. Take a break for a while. Think about why this simulated violence really makes you feel bad and if the thoughts continue to be unpleasant or your distaste for it increases, just stop playing.

    I think it's almost irresistible to not kill the civilians in a GTA game and see how long you can last until the military gets involved to stop you. So saying not to do that in the game sounds like irresponsible advice to me. There are games focused solely on driving in an open world setting though I'm at a loss to name any since i don't play those sorts of games.

    Its totally up to you in the end. I wouldn't think of this as an issue of you personally sinning, since I don't think the simulated violence of video games is sinful. Might be problematic, evidence of our fallen nature and need for conflict but not sin, since we're not actually hurting anyone.
     
  14. Ignatius the Kiwi

    Ignatius the Kiwi Newbie

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    The problem with this logic is that it could apply to any form of recreational activity. Only the most devoted of monastics is capable of living for God 24/7 and yet even they fail at that. The puritan lifestyle is not a mandate but a choice. I think there's some good advice here on certain points, that we shouldn't get addicted to games (a fault I have) but the implication that video games as a whole are somehow particularly wasteful of our time in comparison to other media or activities strikes me as mistaken.
     
  15. AvgJoe

    AvgJoe Member since 2005 Supporter

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    I believe the article covered that where it said, "Below are some principles to consider, whether the question is regarding video games, TV, movies, or any other earthly pursuit."

    I shared the article as a help. There is plenty I can learn from it, as well.
     
  16. NothingIsImpossible

    NothingIsImpossible Well-Known Member

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    Like anything people call anything bad and a sin that they themselves don't partake in. I think drinking, smoking, tattoos, loving sports is a sin. But there are people that will disagree and say things I do is a sin.

    So we have to really just go by what the bible says instead.

    Are playing games a sin? By default no. Just as watching tv. Watching a movie. Listening to a song...etc are not. It depends on what you are playing. Is something like GTA a sin to play for example? Technically no. Should someone be playing it though? Probably not. Jesus obviously would not play it.

    The important question is how do you feel when you play a video game? If you feel bad about killing someone in a game then don't play games with violence then. Now this doesn't mean if someone doesn't feel bad they should play the game then. Because the next question is "Does the game affect your life?".

    For example I didn't care to much about what I would watch or play in my past. But eventually I noticed I swore alot, I made very bad jokes, I said wrong things. All things that I had learned from media I consumed.

    This I changed what I did. Now I have gotten rid of those habits of swearing and what not. I still play games of course. Some are mature. But I am selective now. If a game has to much swearing I try to avoid it. If theres nudity, I tend to avoid it. Violence not so much since that never really affected me. Though I won't play something if its all out ridiculous amounts of gore just to be shocking.
     
  17. SkyWriting

    SkyWriting The Librarian Supporter

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    Always replace old habits with new ones that you prefer to have.
    It takes work to form preferred habits.
     
  18. Sketcher

    Sketcher Born Imperishable

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    I don't play that game myself, but I do a lot of gaming. I don't believe in paying money for a game I will likely be convicted about (and I don't believe in pirating them either).
     
  19. ColinJesusboy28

    ColinJesusboy28 Member

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    Shooting games are the Devil. I use to be addicted to violent video games. Some say it takes away your anger. I would have to disagree BIG TIME. Video games cause anger. My advice is stay away!
    Don't justify it in anyway. Take walks. Cook. learn an instrument. Play board games. You know what I mean? Virtual reality for a long time especially with that stuff will warp you to pieces. I have basic carpletunnel because of growing up with Video game playing and I regret it very much.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2019
  20. FutureAndAHope

    FutureAndAHope Just me Supporter

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    I don't think it is a sin to play computer games. Although each of us may have areas of it that we need to surrender, i.e. if it is too violent, glorifies evil, etc. For me the LORD has been asking me to give up computer games, but that is not for every one, and I will still play with my son if he asks me to. God is not a heavy task master, he allows us to have good, and fun times.

    As for overcoming desires that we feel are contry to God, we should pray more. The bible tells us "pray that you enter not into temptation, for the Spirit is willing and the flesh weak" - of our selves we are prone to weakness, but as we join ourselves to the LORD in prayer we are strengthened in our desires. Prayer is not a 5 minute, task , but a daily, setting aside time abiding.
     
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