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Are Dream Catchers bad?

Discussion in 'Christian Advice' started by BlondieLashes, Jun 14, 2011.

  1. Icefloret

    Icefloret I Love Jesus!

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    I have dreaming problems when I had one. I have a dream/wake issues. I thought it was the dream catcher and throw it out. It still happens. I don't know what it is happening. I felt feathers on my skin the first time I brought it home though. I wake up at night, thinking of things in the room and then see things. I get shadow patterns on walls, crystal like plates that had flower details, I seen black spots spiraling in air above me. Not on the same night. I thought I seen a electronic plug that was setting on my Sony Playstation 3. I thought it was a controller plug. But, I sat looking at it. My thoughts thinking about it. And I knew the plug did not look like that. And the plug part looked like it was in air and oddly started to lay there. The next time I looked again, when my thoughts collected knowing that was not the plug for that. It was gone.

    I know I have a mental illness, I say it alot and do have a strange experiences. I don't talk to the spirit. I notice things. I'm afraid to talk to something that don't leave and something that is harmful. I don't know what it is and like wisdom to deal with it.

    My doctor told me it was my brain thats doing that. Like I wake up and still having a dream. I don't sleepwalk.
     
  2. znr

    znr Report THIS. Supporter

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    Hanging a cross over a bed does nothing spiritual.

    The devil doesnt run in terror at the sign of the cross either.
     
  3. CounselorForChrist

    CounselorForChrist Senior Veteran

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    Most christians I know believe having a dream catcher is just as bad as having a pentagram in your house. These objects don't have power per say. But its the fact of what they represent which is why we should avoid them. As my one topic is about, we americans have stepped far away from what is means to be a christian. We try to reason why its ok to have/do/watch something we shouldn't.
     
  4. mandelduke

    mandelduke Newbie

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    May I ask what you know about Native American religion?
     
  5. JCFantasy23

    JCFantasy23 In a Kingdom by the Sea. Staff Member Administrator Supporter CF Senior Ambassador Angels Team

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    Just like I said on the Christmas thread, people can ignore origins and use all things for good. I think it sounds like a nice gift and decoration and wouldn't worry about it personally.
     
  6. JCFantasy23

    JCFantasy23 In a Kingdom by the Sea. Staff Member Administrator Supporter CF Senior Ambassador Angels Team

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    In older days a lot of Christians took the pentagram as a religious symbol as well. (Meaning the five wounds of Christ on the cross) and as a ward against evil. Again society associates different meanings to objects and they can't always be shunned just because of that. Sometimes the origins are innocent.
     
  7. seashale76

    seashale76 Orthodox Christian and Unapologetic Iconodule

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    I look at them the same way as I view those blue evil eye amulets- superstition. I refuse to have that sort of stuff in my house- but that's just me.
     
  8. seashale76

    seashale76 Orthodox Christian and Unapologetic Iconodule

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    The sign of the cross if powerful- and it is our faith that saves us.
     
  9. sea oat

    sea oat Well-Known Member

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    I had a little one in my house, back in 2008, that I used as a fan pull. It came in the mail from the St. Joseph's Indian School, which is a Catholic school for Lakota Indians in South Dakota. It's a part of their culture, and I see nothing wrong with it.

    There are quite a few things in our culture that have non-Christian origins, which I have no problem with using in a decorative fashion. Christmas trees are one.
     
  10. mandelduke

    mandelduke Newbie

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  11. LoricaLady

    LoricaLady YHWH's Supporter

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    If there is one thing your Heavenly Father hates, it's paganism. Dream catchers are purely pagan and certainly are tied to a philosophy that is contrary to Scriptures. Some say that such things can invite evil spirits into the home, also. Praying that you will be given wisdom about such things.
     
  12. mandelduke

    mandelduke Newbie

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    You mean like Easter and Halloween. Giving a Native American child a dream catcher is like giving your child a teddy bear. Now Christens Murdered Native Americans took their land, broke every treaty they ever made. Took their children from their mothers, sent them hundreds of miles from their homes, and forbid them to speak their own language. And you call them pagans. I ask again what do you know about Native American Religion?
     
  13. Goodbook

    Goodbook Reading the Bible

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    I think..just be careful about objects. Especially those given as gifts. I've found that many people use gifts as a way of having power over that person, for example, boyfriends giving teddy bears to their girlfriends. seemingly innocent but I know from experience that things like dolls can be used in witchcraft and spiritualism as contact objects/fetishes to affect another person. Not saying your mum pracitices voodoo but you don't know about the person who made it.

    Personally I would be better off without it but if you can't throw it away just anoint it with oil and pray over it so if it has been cursed or made with evil intent it won't affect your son.

    Actually I find dolls and puppets now to be really questionable and I think as close to idols as we have in God's word, because children do ascribe real thoughts and feelings to objects, and worship them by always having them around. You may think this sounds a bit paranoid but the more I read God's word on the topic, the more I understand things like for example the makers of Sesame street just so many of them died young and tragically and my conclusion is that they are subtly introducing idolatry to children through the medium of television, they encourage childrent to believe this piece of fabric is a real frog, pig, monster etc.
     
  14. AmishHacker

    AmishHacker Theologian

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    There is absolutely nothing wrong with owning a Dream Catcher.

    AmishHacker
     
  15. mandelduke

    mandelduke Newbie

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    What is wrong with these people?
     
  16. seashale76

    seashale76 Orthodox Christian and Unapologetic Iconodule

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    We should recognize what Native Americans naturally got right, but there is only salvation through Christ. Plenty of Native American groups converted to Christianity (and not all of them were coerced by white settlers to do so). We have Native American saints in the Orthodox Church (some of whom were martyrs). Entire cultures can and have been consecrated to Christ (among Native Americans, as well as among groups in Europe, etcetera). They even have liturgy in their native languages (ex: Tlingit). However, we also must be careful. Dream catchers, evil eye amulets, voodoo dolls- these things reflect pagan practices- and anyone who gives them any credence is engaging in superstition and opening spiritual doors they shouldn't be.

    BTW- some of these white 'Christians' persecuted natives who were already Christian when they had contact. So, this seems to be more a case of racism than anything else.

    ETA: The Greeks were Christianized ages ago, but even among that culture, the evil eye amulet is still considered pagan.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2012
  17. CounselorForChrist

    CounselorForChrist Senior Veteran

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    Most people I know that have dream catches also celebrate halloween, own ouija boards, watch supernatural horror movies and so on. And yes I know that doesn't apply to everyone. I am just saying if we start to make room and exceptions for what we accept into our lives, it isn't long until we add more and more unacceptable things.

    My ex-fiance was american indian and she was really into her heritage. She had dream catchers, talked about her spirit creature (wolf or something) and so on. If I wasn't so blinded by what I thought was love I would have left her since she refused to give up her belief in the ways of the american indian.
     
  18. GloryBe!

    GloryBe! Always learning.....

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    I an flabbergasted that you just compared a dream catcher with a VOODOO doll! A voodoo doll is used to inflict suffering on another person for those who practice black magic. A dream catcher is a whimsical idea weaved into a beautiful work of art. The idea being that the giver hopes that the catcher will "catch" the bad dreams of the receiver. It's a gift of love and caring and concern for the other person (or just a gift of beautiful handcrafted art).
    If someone is truly concerned about it's supposed "paganism" (which I don't agree with, since the Indians were influenced by Jews long ago, and know the Creator,God the father under the concept of "the Great Spirit" ), then just pray over it, and or anoint it with oil in the name of Jesus. that should dispel any bad karma you think might be attached to it.
     
  19. mandelduke

    mandelduke Newbie

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    Let me try to make this clear I have never heard of a dreamcatcher being used in any Native American religious ceremonies, and I have been to many. Furthermore if you ask 10 Native Americans what a dreamcatcher is you will get 10 different answers. A dreamcatcher is nothing more the a teddy bear or night lite to Native American children in the Ojibway (Chippewa) tribe.

    Origin of the dreamcatcher.
    Dreamcatchers are an authentic American Indian tradition, from the Ojibway (Chippewa) tribe. Ojibway people would tie sinew strands in a web around a small round or tear-shaped frame--in a somewhat similar pattern to how they tied webbing for their snowshoes--and hang this "dream-catcher" as a charm to protect sleeping children from nightmares. The legend is that the bad dreams will get caught in the web. Traditionally Native American dreamcatchers are small (only a few inches across) and made of bent wood and sinew string with a feather hanging from the netting, but wrapping the frame in leather is also pretty common, and today you'll often see them made with sturdier string meant to last longer and decorated with beaded thongs. During the pan-Indian movement in the 60's and 70's, Ojibway dreamcatchers started to get popular in other Native American tribes, even those in disparate places like the Cherokee, Lakota, and Navajo. So dreamcatchers aren't traditional in most Indian cultures, per se, but they're sort of neo-traditional, like frybread. Today you see them hanging in lots of places other than a child's cradleboard or nursery, like the living room or your rearview mirror. Some Indians think dream-catchers are a sweet and loving little tradition, others consider them a symbol of native unity, and still others think of them as sort of the Indian equivalent of a tacky plastic Jesus hanging in your truck.

    So where can you find one? In Indian territory, almost everywhere. People are making dreamcatchers in just about every Indian reservation in the US or Canada, and you can find them at any tribal gift shop, powwow, or Indian event. But on the Internet, oddly enough: practically nowhere. Most of what you see when you search for "Native American dreamcatchers" was mass-produced in an Asian sweatshop somewhere or glued together by non-native teenagers with eBay accounts, and often bears only vague resemblance to the actual American Indian craft it is supposed to represent. If you are looking to buy an authentic dreamcatcher that was actually made by Native Americans--either because it's important to you to have the real thing or because you want to support native people with your purchase--then here is our list of American Indian craftspeople who supply dreamcatchers for sale online. If you have a website of native dreamcatchers to add to this list, let us know. We gladly advertise any individual native artist or native-owned art store here free of charge, provided that all dreamcatchers are made by tribally recognized American Indian, Inuit, or First Nations artists.
     
  20. seashale76

    seashale76 Orthodox Christian and Unapologetic Iconodule

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    You conveniently ignored the similarities between a dream catcher and an evil eye amulet though. They both could be categorized as magic amulets.
     
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