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Are Anabaptists Protestant?

Discussion in 'Baptists' started by Conservative Mennonite, Apr 13, 2005.

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  1. Are Anabaptists Protestant? The answer is definitely yes. Or at least, the counterparts of today's Anabaptists were. But, we do have to remember not all the Anabaptist groups of the Reformation are the same. The Catholics and other Reformers called anybody who practiced Adult Baptism 'Anabaptists.' The term Anabaptists means 're-baptizers.' There were Anabaptists who sought political change, and they were wiped out. The forerunners of today's Mennonites, Amish, and Hutterites were not seeking political change, they were known as the Brethren. That is part of the reason that they were so hated by both Protestants and Catholics. The Anabaptists were heavily persecuted by both. During the Reformation period, all the European countries had mixed religion and politics. Some countries were 'Catholic' and persecuted all those who weren't. Some were Protestant, and likewise persecuted others. But Anabaptists/Brethren were persecuted by all. Even the American government persecuted the Brethren even up into the twentieth century during WWI. More information on Anabaptist/Brethren History can be found at my homepage if you're interested.
     
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  2. McDLT

    McDLT Well-Known Member

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    I've gotten a bit of a mixed message - you say yes they are protestant, but then separate them when discussing persecution. I would have to deduce then that they are not Protestant.

    There were Anabaptists around before the Reformation and my thinking is that the Reformation helped to define Anabaptists sects more clearly. The Reformation gave them a voice that neither the Catholics nor the Protestants wanted, thus the persecution.

    Just some of how I'm viewing your posts, mixed with a bit of religious history schooling.
     
  3. MrJim

    MrJim Legend 3/17/05

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  4. daveleau

    daveleau In all you do, do it for Christ and w/ Him in mind

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    Baptists trace their roots to Puritans and Anabaptists (not sure who was first) who trace their lineage back to the Apostles, even before the formation of the church in Rome set up by Constantine. Luther began the Reformation, which caused splits in the Roman church. These splintered groups are called Protestants because they protested against the Roman church.

    Even though this is our history, this is splitting hairs. I wish there was only one denomination- one set under Christ. Despite the group delineations, there are plenty of Christians (and plenty of non-Christians- but only God knows who they are) in each denomination.
     
  5. McDLT

    McDLT Well-Known Member

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    I do agree that there is no one correct denomination and that all the matters is Jesus. I just thought that this the place where we can "split hairs" and figure out what the denomination believes? Thus getting to know one another and appreciate each others differences.

    From what I can remember of my history Anabaptists trace their roots back to the first church.
     
  6. MrJim

    MrJim Legend 3/17/05

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    I'll :amen: that. It's definitely a hindrance to evangelizing. My unsaved little brother once asked why there can't be a building with just the word "church" on it. Guess we'll have it in heaven.
     
  7. Yes, I do distinguish them when discussing persecution, but only because they were being persecuted by the Catholics and other Reformers. There were two large groups of Protestants, the Anabaptists were a fairly small group. The two large groups were known as the Lutherans, and the Reformers(later to be known as the Calvinists). That's the only reason I distinguished between them.
     
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  9. MrJim

    MrJim Legend 3/17/05

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  11. MrJim

    MrJim Legend 3/17/05

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  12. McDLT

    McDLT Well-Known Member

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    So then I guess the Anabaptists aren't Protestants. They just happened at the same time. Protestants against Catholics; Protestants and Catholics against Anabaptists.
     
  13. Mmmm...you'd almost have to say that they were Protestants. They were definitely protesting the Catholic church, but in a different way than the other Protestantes.
     
  14. McDLT

    McDLT Well-Known Member

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    Well then I wouldn't say they were the same as Protestants. Being different does not make them the same -- it makes them different.
     
  15. constance

    constance The littlest billy goat gruff

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    Anabaptists are "Radical Reformers" - hard core reformers!

    Anabaptists pushed Sola Scriptura, Separation of Church & State, Freedom of Conscience, Believer's Baptism, and living a holy life (rejection of Sola Fide).

    Two words: Dirk Willems. The man who was not afraid to turn back.

    Constance
     
  16. JimfromOhio

    JimfromOhio Life of Trials :)

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    Anabaptists often reflect just the general Protestant view of salvation - much like Baptists, Assembly of God, etc. Faith and repentance are taught - and this is Scriptural and good. Anabaptists agree with most Protestants (indeed, most Christians) on most theological basics, but differ on several major beliefs. One major belief is that the Anabaptists placed a high spiritual value on baptism and so believed that this was the thought of God on the matter that they were willing to risk life and limb to follow through on what they saw as Biblical conversion. With such a high value placed on baptism, they were willing to pay the high price for the promise of God - and consequently, so many went to their deaths. Yes, the Anabaptists clashed with the Catholics, Lutherans, and Reformed on other issues, but by and large, baptism seemed to be the key teaching that brought about so much controversy.
     
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