1. Welcome to Christian Forums, a forum to discuss Christianity in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to the following site features:
    • Reply to discussions and create your own threads.
    • Our modern chat room. No add-ons or extensions required, just login and start chatting!
    • Private Member only forums for more serious discussions that you may wish to not have guests or search engines access to.
    • Your very own blog. Write about anything you like on your own individual blog.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon and God Bless!

  2. We are holding our 2022 Angel Ministry Drive now. Please consider signing up, or if you have any questions about being an Angel, use our staff application form. The world needs more prayer now, and it is a great way to help other members of the forums. :) To Apply...click here

Anglicanism vs Catholicism

Discussion in 'Scripture,Tradition,Reason-Anglican & Old Catholic' started by Saint Dominicus, Jul 24, 2020.

  1. Saint Dominicus

    Saint Dominicus New Member

    6
    +8
    United Kingdom
    Non-Denom
    Private
    Hi there,
    so this may be a rather long winded one but I'm returning to religion/new to religion. I was raised with a diluted form of anglicanism essentially. So I've been wanting to get back into the church however the more I read, the more I feel the C of E itself has been diluted and is coming away from the scriptures.

    I've been reading about high-church anglicanism and anglo-catholicism, and catholicism itself. I understand the whole via media approach kept alot of the old traditions and movements such as the oxford movement has had influences; but for there to still be distinct differences between two churches and multiple groups within the anglican church.

    If people would kindly offer some insight and explain some of the key differences that would be fantastic.
     
  2. VincentIII

    VincentIII New Member

    78
    +47
    United States
    Catholic
    Married
  3. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

    +32,327
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    I cannot tell for certain what the orientation of that website is, but unfortunately there isn't much in it that addresses the various parties within Anglicanism such as Anglo-Catholicism, Biblical Anglicanism, High Church, Low Church, etc.

    And then there are the Anglican church bodies in the UK which are independent of the CofE.

    In some respects, the differences between various of these may not matter much, but in others, it could be important.

    Perhaps we need more information than was given in the original post.
     
  4. Julian of Norwich

    Julian of Norwich English Catholic

    485
    +365
    United States
    Anglican
    Single
    US-American-Solidarity
    This, from the above article, shows a major difference to me especially with the interest of many Anglicans in the EO:
    • One of the crucial tendencies of the Anglican Church was a tendency to restore the faith of the early Christian Church. Anglicans are famous for being consecutive seekers of reformation of Christianity. The Roman Catholic Church, on the other hand, is rather counter-reformation, as the authorities of the Catholic Church adhere to the mediaeval concept of the authority of the Pope.
     
  5. Saint Dominicus

    Saint Dominicus New Member

    6
    +8
    United Kingdom
    Non-Denom
    Private
    Thanks for the reply’s :smiley:
     
  6. Red Gold

    Red Gold Well-Known Member

    +513
    Germany
    Catholic
    Married
    Anglicanism vs Catholicism

    I think both are very close, aren't they?
     
  7. seeking.IAM

    seeking.IAM Episcopalian Supporter

    +4,221
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    It depends upon where you look. I would say they are quite similar in some places, less so in others. There is variance in how Anglicanism looks and is lived.
     
  8. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

    +32,327
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    With the exception of the Eastern Christian churches and the possible exception of the Old Catholic churches in Europe, it's probably safe to say that the Anglican churches are closer to the Roman Catholic Church than any other, yes.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • List
  9. Padres1969

    Padres1969 Episcopalian

    403
    +180
    Anglican
    Married
    US-Others
    Well yes... and no. Anglicanism is probably the most difficult branch of Christianity to nail down under one single category because of it's via media / big tent approach to the faith. There are segments of Anglicanism in the Anglo Catholic tradition that are more historical Catholic than the current Catholic church in many ways. There are subsets of Anglicanism in the low church sections of the family that wouldn't be out of place in similar comparison to Evangelical protestants in their worship. And of course doctrinally Anglicans run the gamut similarly from the beyond Catholic in their conservative interpretation of the scriptures to branches that are as nearly as progressive in their interpretation as you'd be able to find.

    That said, in this core is the various BCPs that the branches hold, and yes inside that book is a faith that is probably most similar to Catholicism than any other out there beyond Orthodox and the Eastern Churches. But the BCP is usually the Anglican starting point, not the end all.
     
  10. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

    +32,327
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    That's true, but when questions like this one arise, I think that the only reasonable answer is to point to the official positions taken by the churches...or at least to what is the norm.

    Nor is that particularly strange, given that almost all other branches/denominations of the Christian religion have, among their members in good standing, a similar range of beliefs and practices.
     
  11. The Liturgist

    The Liturgist Traditional Liturgical Christian Supporter

    +3,506
    United States
    Generic Orthodox Christian
    Celibate
    What about those ultra high church Lutheran bodies that identify as Evangelical Catholic, and have bishops, such as the Church of Sweden, the Lutheran Church of Finland, and the Church of Norway? (And to a lesser extent, the Church of Denmark). Those strike me as being equivalent to high church or Anglo Catholic Anglicanism, or Old Catholicism.

    Also, what about Western Rite Orthodoxy? Specifically the Antiochian Western Rite Vicarate and the ROCOR Western Rite, and also the Syriac Orthodox Western Rite in Sri Lanka?

    -

    By the way, I absolutely love Anglicanism. I think I am technically a member of the Episcopal Church because before my friend retired, I received communion there three times, although my current work in a different denomination might invalidate that membership. I am considering rejoining however if I could arrange something with the Order of the Holy Cross to try to restart their monastery in Santa Barbara.
     
  12. Albion

    Albion Facilitator

    +32,327
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    Could be, but I don't know enough about them to decide.

    However, the comparison had been between whole denominations/communions (Anglicanism and/or Catholicism), which is different IMHO from selecting out certain factions or national churches for the comparison.

    So that's just how I looked at it.

    Well, they're still Orthodox Eastern jurisdictions, so I would say that was covered.

    Very interesting. :)
     
  13. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +17,290
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Aren't they in full communion with Canterbury because of the Porvoo agreement anyway?
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • List
  14. PloverWing

    PloverWing Episcopalian

    +3,828
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    If you're already a member of the Episcopal Church, then Communion three times a year makes you a "communicant", a kind of "active member in good standing" status. (See Church Membership & Transfers - Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island, Membership information | All Saints Episcopal Church ) However, merely receiving Communion doesn't make you a member. There's a formal process of being recorded in a particular parish's register. It's not a difficult or lengthy process, but it is something you deliberately choose, that's then officially recorded.

    You're welcome to continue receiving Communion, of course, for as long as you like, regardless of what denomination you belong to.
     
  15. The Liturgist

    The Liturgist Traditional Liturgical Christian Supporter

    +3,506
    United States
    Generic Orthodox Christian
    Celibate
    That’s my understanding, with of course the prominent exception of the Mission Provinces, which are traditionalist but high church rather than Sydney-style.
     
  16. The Liturgist

    The Liturgist Traditional Liturgical Christian Supporter

    +3,506
    United States
    Generic Orthodox Christian
    Celibate
    they sort of told me after I had my third communion there that I was a member...it may have been irregular but I did not object, because the priest was my friend. However that would mean I am no longer a communicant, since I havent been there since my friend retired.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • List
  17. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +17,290
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Mission Provinces?

    They may have meant, we've seen you around enough now to consider that you're part of our community. But formal membership requires more than that.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • List
  18. The Liturgist

    The Liturgist Traditional Liturgical Christian Supporter

    +3,506
    United States
    Generic Orthodox Christian
    Celibate
    These are traditionalist groups which have not formally separated from the Church of Sweden or the Church of Norway. But they are high church traditionalist, not low church or evangelical. So it would be more like, say, the Anglican Province of Christ the King, than like the Archdiocese of Sydney.

    There is also a Norwegian Catholic Church which is in communion with the Polish National Catholic Church.

    Well, I spoke with my friend the retired priest earlier and he recalls that I was put on the membership register at my request, which I have no recollection of, so I guess I’ll have to call and ask them.
     
  19. seeking.IAM

    seeking.IAM Episcopalian Supporter

    +4,221
    United States
    Anglican
    Married
    As a convert from Methodism to the Episcopal Church, the latter's membership requirements always seems unclear to me. So, I am curious about your statement, "membership requires more than that."

    I attended, communed, and gave sporadically for a few years before becoming confirmed. Years prior to confirmation, I remember one Sunday being told where I could pick up my information to vote in the annual meeting (eligible only to members). That was the first I realized they considered me a member before I did. I was never quite sure how I got that standing. I had never done any sort of letter of transfer from my UMC or even had a conversation with my Rector about membership. So, how does it happen? Is it common that one becomes a member without knowing it?
     
  20. Paidiske

    Paidiske Clara bonam audax Supporter

    +17,290
    Australia
    Anglican
    Married
    Except that the Province of Christ the King is not in communion Canterbury, and you are saying that these groups are still in communion with their founding bodies. Perhaps more like SSPX?

    A lot of Anglican churches maintain two lists of "members." One is those people who broadly fall under your pastoral umbrella. Visiting three times and showing an interest would be enough to get you on that list. But the other is those who have voting rights, can stand for governing bodies, etc., and for that there's a more formal process.
     
Loading...