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Jesus is Hardly a Pacifist (Neither is St. Michael, nor Gandalf)

Discussion in 'One Bread, One Body - Catholic' started by Michie, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. Michie

    Michie Manipulation Resistance Team Supporter CF Ambassador

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    Whenever the Gospel scene of Jesus cleansing the Temple comes up in conversation, is it always entertaining to see people try to rationalize or explain away the anger that our Lord displayed. There are those who will say that this is a demonstration of Jesus’ humanity, but such an explanation always seems to have an accompanying tinge of “perfect divinity, imperfect humanity.” After all, when we say of someone, “He is only human,” we are usually doing so to justify an imperfect action or reaction, as if to say, “He is human, and therefore not perfect.” Such an accusation of Jesus is misleading at best. Yes, Jesus is human, fully human, in fact, as well as fully divine. However, Jesus is perfect in his humanity. Therefore, any reaction he gives is the perfect reaction to the situation that stands before him. This is good news for the rest of us, for it demonstrates that humanity in both its core and destiny is fundamentally good, that imperfections found within all of us are the result of sin (both original and personal), and not the result of being human as such. Therefore, the perfection that Jesus possesses in being fully human is a perfection that awaits us, God willing, in our glorified state.

    What then, should we make of the anger demonstrated by Jesus in his cleansing of the Temple? The first conclusion we can draw is that there is a place for a righteous anger in dealing with the problem of sin. Of course, we should not mistake this kind of anger for the irrational, impatient, and reactionary kind that we so often demonstrate in our lives. But Jesus is hardly a pacifist. To get a better sense of righteous anger, it helps to consider a few examples. The first we will take from the life of Jesus, the second from the archangel Michael, and the third from that master of myth, J.R.R. Tolkien.


    Continued- http://the-american-catholic.com/2011/03/23/jesus-is-hardly-a-pacifist-neither-is-st-michael-nor-gandalf/
     
  2. ebia

    ebia Senior Contributor

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    The article seems to have a particular and rather simplistic view of what pacifism is.
     
  3. Colin

    Colin Senior Veteran

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    I couldn't see one iota of evidence in the article to justify the comment that Jesus was not a pacifist .

    To have righteous anger is not to deny pacifism .
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  4. ebia

    ebia Senior Contributor

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    That's what I mean - it seems to build a strawman to demolish, where pacifism is being 'nice' all the time.
     
  5. Davidnic

    Davidnic Have Fun Supporter

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    Pacifism has too many credible definitions. In WWI pacifism was a rejection of violence but it allowed for the belief that a just war could be allowed to create peace. At other times, before and after that, if was and is the opposition to any kind of war.

    Christ is not opposed to a just war. He is opposed to a mindset of war that excludes attempts at real peace. Christ is a peacemaker. But He is also in support of opposing evil with physical action if necessary and it promotes peace. One must strive for peace always, but be ready to oppose actual evil at a cost.

    So He fits some definitions of pacifism but not others. Christ blesses those who work for peace, but He also shows us that there are times when we can not let evil rampage unopposed. So He is a Pacifist in the sense that the Latin pacifici is one who works for peace. He is not a pacifist in the sense that war can never be justified.
     
  6. Andrew Ryan

    Andrew Ryan I like any king that can reign with his fist

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    I like to picture my Jesu with a bible in one hand and a uzi in the other.

    Uzi does it.
     
  7. SolomonVII

    SolomonVII Well-Known Member

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    There will be a second coming in which justice will be the emphasis.

    There is a time for everything;
    a time to kill, and a time to heal.
    A time for war, and a time for peace.

    Wisdom seeks those times in order to give the correct response in the ordained time.
     
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