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For Those of You Who Think Traditionalism is the Answer....

Discussion in 'One Bread, One Body - Catholic' started by Fantine, May 11, 2013.

  1. Fantine

    Fantine Dona Quixote

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    I was in elementary school and during Vatican II, and we never read from the Bible, although I had a children's Bible at home and read it from cover to cover.

    But even worse, we didn't hear it in Church, either, because two of the readings were in Latin....

    So instead of hearing God's word four times--three readings and a responsorial psalm--all we heard was the Gospel.

    No, the Latin Mass wasn't better....but it gave everyone a chance to say their rosaries.

    The 70's was my ten year break from church, so I have no idea what happened during that time. I just remember when I did go back I found a parish that was like a breath of fresh air.
     
  2. Lepanto

    Lepanto Newbie

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    Traditionalism certainly is the answer to today's crisis.
    As Professor Plinio de Oliveira pointed out, the society is sinking due to PRIDE and Sensuality. Drifting away from Tradition leads us to sink more and more in Pride and Sensuality.

    Doing away with Tradition will only make the crisis worse.
     
  3. crimsonleaf

    crimsonleaf Guest

    I'd just like to put an alternative view to the one posited by Cogent if I may. Cogent has had an experience of evangelical churches which would drive most to seek something else. I'm an evangelical Reformed Baptist, on paper the very antithesis of people posting here. The services we hold are quiet reverential affairs. The Lord's Supper (communion/eucharist) is taken in complete silence accompanied by silent prayer. Our hymns are accompanied by piano, and on special occasions it is joined by a harp, cello and violin. Preaching from a raised pulpit is true teaching, and lasts for 45 minutes. Christ is the centre of everything. We do not talk in tongues, get "slain in the spirit" or otherwise laugh hysterically or fall over. We simply worship our great God in a simple, uncluttered way.

    Most Reformed evangelicals operate this way, but I suspect those leaving the Catholic Church are doing so (in the main) to try to experience a greater sense of God's presence. My own view is that the reverential attention paid to God in both Reformed AND Catholic Churches is not what they're seeking, preferring a hype-ridden false experience which puts them more centrally in the experience.

    My church used to be known as Grace Evangelical Church. We dropped the "Evangelical" to become simply Grace Church, because the word evangelical was hijacked by a portion of the faith offering what I believe to be false experiences.

    My only reason for posting is to point out that "Evangelical" churches CAN offer a reverential experience of God without cheapening the experience.
     
  4. Tallguy88

    Tallguy88 Theology Category Supervisor Staff Member Supervisor Supporter CF Ambassador

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    Thank you. This is my experience with traditional Baptist churches in my area. Simple and reverent. To a catholic, it's like a long service of the Word. And if the sermon is on a topic that most Christians agree about, it can be largely indistinguishable from a Catholic homily.
     
  5. Sarcalogos Deus

    Sarcalogos Deus Welch Ein Mensch!

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    Growing up in Baptist country this is what I remember as well visiting a friend's church.

    I call it a hymn sandwich (opening hymn, sermon, prayers, closing hymn) but it is reverential.
     
  6. Tallguy88

    Tallguy88 Theology Category Supervisor Staff Member Supervisor Supporter CF Ambassador

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    I have no trouble worshiping God in a traditional Baptist service. Contemporary services, otoh, are too difficult. It's like sensory overload.

    Edit: But that's true regardless of denomination.
     
  7. Sarcalogos Deus

    Sarcalogos Deus Welch Ein Mensch!

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    Same here, country Baptist churches are something I still have a soft spot for, and I even visit the one just down the road from me occasionally, but living in Arkansas I'm sure you're just as familiar with them as I am.
     
  8. Many Latinos are Catholic in name alone. By the way, the Church hasn't gone back to pre-Vatican II. So you blaming Traditional Catholicism makes absolutely no sense.
     
  9. TheOtherHockeyMom

    TheOtherHockeyMom Contributor

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    What do you mean by that?
     
  10. I mean many are Catholic in name alone. My wife's family is an example of how American secularism has lured the much of the newer generations of Latino Catholics away from the Catholic traditions of their parents and grandparents. They are like a low-hanging fruit that is easy to pick.
     
  11. TheOtherHockeyMom

    TheOtherHockeyMom Contributor

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    I'm not following you. What makes Latinos, in your opinion, a lower hanging fruit than non-Latino Catholics, and easier to lure away?
     
  12. You are trying to make it like I said all Latinos. Nice try at a straw man, but no cigar.
     
  13. MKJ

    MKJ Contributor

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    No, she was just asking what you meant - why do you think Latinos, in general, are easier to lure away than others.
     
  14. You are trying the same thing. I didn't say "Latinos in general". I said there are many Latinos who are Catholic in name alone. There are also many Caucasians who are Catholic in name alone. There's a big difference between what I said and want you are trying to force me to say to mischaracterize me. But I can see the tactic clearly. :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 14, 2013
  15. Tallguy88

    Tallguy88 Theology Category Supervisor Staff Member Supervisor Supporter CF Ambassador

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    You're not going to get very far in this forum if you dodge every question you're asked.
     
  16. The question has to be based on what I actually said before I can answer it. :)
     
    Wolseley likes this.
  17. TheOtherHockeyMom

    TheOtherHockeyMom Contributor

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    I'm just wondering what you meant by many Latinos being 'low hanging fruit'? That's what you said, right?
     
  18. TheOtherHockeyMom

    TheOtherHockeyMom Contributor

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    This is what you said exactly, what do you mean by it?
     
  19. I already expanded on what I was saying. And you keep asking "what do you mean?" What do you mean asking me what do I mean? Two can play at this game. ;)
     
  20. crimsonleaf

    crimsonleaf Guest

    Is a simple mis-speak worth pursuing to this degree?