Home | Be a Christian | Devotionals | Join Us! | Forums | Rules | F.A.Q.


Go Back   Christian Forums > Congregation > Christian Communities > Theologia Crucis - Lutherans
Register BlogsPrayersJobsArcade Calendar Mark Forums Read

Theologia Crucis - Lutherans The forum for ELCA, LCMS, WELS, ELC, Moravian and other similar churches.

Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Unread 3rd May 2004, 12:26 PM
ZeroTX's Avatar
Regular Member

39 Gender: Male Faith: Christian Country: United States Member For 5 Years
 
Join Date: 11th April 2004
Location: Houston, TEXAS
Posts: 134
Blessings: 81,751
My Mood Blah
Reps: 117 (power: 0)
ZeroTX has a spectacular aura aboutZeroTX has a spectacular aura about
Lutheran vs. Catholic: Itemized differences?

Hi guys,

In another thread I discussed the fact that I am a Protestant who is presently dating a Catholic. It is my very limited-knowledge understanding that Lutherans and Catholics share many beliefs (more so than say a Baptist and a Catholic), and I was curious if someone could tell me in very brief "listed out" terms the things off the top of their head...

for instance..

Eucharist/Communion/Lord's Supper -- "real presence" or "symbolic gesture of faith"? Provided every week, or what frequency? Requirements to take communion? Protestants who are NOT Lutheran allowed to partake?

Papacy -- Is there an "infallible" Lutheran authority, or is it like most other Faiths and we are just human beings who accept guidance from the Holy Spirit? (The Papacy is the #1 reason I can never accept Catholicism.... I'm a History nut with a Bachelor's degree in History, and study of the History of the Papacy is enough to make you never believe in the papacy, not even for a minute)

Baptism -- immersion or sprinkle? Infant baptism or upon making a conscious choice and commitment?

Scripture -- Sole authority or not?

Worship style -- singing, music? What kind? Solemn adoration or joyful praise? Hand waving, dancing, etc? Physical gestures? Statues or other physical objects (i.e. rosary?)... Is there a "sermon" that allows you to get a real message out of it (perhaps thematic??) or is it like the Homily, rather dry?? What percentage of the church service is worship ritual (singing, communion, "other" ritual) vs. the actual message from the Minister?... Are the messages usually relevant with specific examples for life and heavy use of Scriptural support?

I guess, what I'm really looking for is to find out the big similarities and big differences. I'm want us both (me and the girl I'm dating) to write down the "my church MUST believe this" and "my church MUST do this ritual" etc so that we can see if we will EVER be compatible religiously... as it is, I'm not too happy about the idea of marrying and having my children forced to become Catholic or else risk an Ecclesiastical Curse upon us (Anathema) as indicated by the RCC!!! Fear is such a horrible way to convince people to follow the church's rules.

Thanks guys,

Michael
Become a CF Site Supporter Today and Make These Ads Go Away!

  #2  
Unread 3rd May 2004, 01:17 PM
JVAC's Avatar
Baptized into His name

29 Gender: Male Faith: Lutheran Party: US-Others Country: United States Member For 5 Years
 
Join Date: 28th November 2003
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 2,484
Blessings: 147,633
Reps: 882 (power: 0)
JVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really nice
Eucharist/Communion/Lord's Supper -- "real presence" or "symbolic gesture of faith"? Provided every week, or what frequency? Requirements to take communion? Protestants who are NOT Lutheran allowed to partake?
All Lutherans believe in the Real Pressence (Christ is present in the Bread and Wine), and how that Pressence is manifested is not defined by the Church (though I don't know if you can find a Lutheran who believes in Transubstantiation). Many Lutheran Churches celebrate the Eucharist (Holy Communion) every Sunday, yet there are also quite a few that do it every other week or once a month. In the ELCA (Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.elca.org )there is open communion that is, all who believe in Jesus as Lord and Saviour and that recognize Him as truly pressent in the Eucharist are invited to share the meal, with the reasoning that Christ is the Host of the meal and He wishes all to come unto him. LCMS and WELS all have closed communion (there might be a few congregations that celbrate an open Eucharist). Usually in a closed communion church you must confess the teachings of the Church before you can recieve the Holy Sacrament of the Altar (that is the Small Catechism usually).

Papacy -- Is there an "infallible" Lutheran authority, or is it like most other Faiths and we are just human beings who accept guidance from the Holy Spirit? (The Papacy is the #1 reason I can never accept Catholicism.... I'm a History nut with a Bachelor's degree in History, and study of the History of the Papacy is enough to make you never believe in the papacy, not even for a minute)
The only infallible Lutheran authority is Scripture alone. The heirarchy of most Lutheran churches is a democratic one, usually ran by either a president or Presiding Bishop, which is always elected to a term. The ELCA uses Bishops as executive heads of Synods (local churches united in a region, sub-national). The Bishops are responsible to the Synod Council. Basically the national church and the World Church (either LWF [Lutheran World Federation] or ILC depending on your perspective) are all ran the same way a congregation is ran.

Now we also have the Book of Concord which are the confessions of the Church, that is, they are our guidelines of how the Church has traditionally understood Scripture; such documents are: Three Ecumenical Creeds (Apostle's, Nicene, Athanasian) Augsburg Confession and its Apology, Schmalcald Articles, Formula of Concord, the Large and Small Catechisms. ( www.bookofconcord.org )

Baptism -- immersion or sprinkle? Infant baptism or upon making a conscious choice and commitment?
Baptism is traditionally practiced upon infants with a confirmation of that baptism performed in about 8th grade. Baptism is a time which God claims a child unto himself, and the time for confession of the faith is reserved for the "Rite of Confirmation" which is done later after the Child is educated in the faith. Of Baptism we believe "Of Baptism they teach that it is necessary to salvation, and that through Baptism is offered the grace of God, and that children are to be baptized who, being offered to God through Baptism are received into God's grace. " (Augsburg Confession)

Scripture -- Sole authority or not?


Yes. We believe Scripture is the Sole infallable authority, and we rely on tradition also, but only tradition that is not contrary to scripture, ex: papal infallability.

Worship style -- singing, music? What kind? Solemn adoration or joyful praise? Hand waving, dancing, etc? Physical gestures? Statues or other physical objects (i.e. rosary?)... Is there a "sermon" that allows you to get a real message out of it (perhaps thematic??) or is it like the Homily, rather dry?? What percentage of the church service is worship ritual (singing, communion, "other" ritual) vs. the actual message from the Minister?... Are the messages usually relevant with specific examples for life and heavy use of Scriptural support?
Most Lutheran services are High Church. We traditionally follow the Ancient Western Mass, though modified of its abuses. The Lutheran Mass boasts of its combination between authoritative preaching and Sacramental emphasis. Also the Lutheran Church is aptly named "The singing church" for we sing a lot. Our pastors give Sermons, and Sermons are always based on readings from the Lectionary (the lectionary is an accountability tool) yet, the Pastor always makes it relevant to the Congregation. However there are "Contemporary Services" that more resemble the latest christian fad of Christian Rock, yet we retain dignity in the Church because of our Sacramental emphasis (Word and Sacrament Church, that is we emphasise both the Word (Bible/Sermon) and Sacraments (Communion/Baptism)). We usually don't have statues of Saints or Mary in Church, nor do we pray a Rosary, though it is not forbidden.

This is all I can answer this quickly, but if you have more questions feel free to ask!!

-James
__________________
"Let us rather be of good courage and rejoice always as men who are being saved. Let us ponder in our soul that the Lord is with us, He who put the evil spirits to flight and made them impotent." -St Antony the Great

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
  #3  
Unread 3rd May 2004, 01:25 PM
ChiRho's Avatar
Confessional Lutheran Catholic

34 Gender: Male Faith: Lutheran Party: US-Libertarian Country: United States Member For 5 Years
View Profile Pic
 
Join Date: 5th March 2004
Location: Fort Wayne
Posts: 1,988
Blessings: 70,471
My Mood Amused
Reps: 3,378,810 (power: 3,390)
ChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant future
ChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant future
Originally Posted by ZeroTX
Hi guys,

In another thread I discussed the fact that I am a Protestant who is presently dating a Catholic. It is my very limited-knowledge understanding that Lutherans and Catholics share many beliefs (more so than say a Baptist and a Catholic), and I was curious if someone could tell me in very brief "listed out" terms the things off the top of their head...

for instance..

Eucharist/Communion/Lord's Supper -- "real presence" or "symbolic gesture of faith"? Provided every week, or what frequency? Requirements to take communion? Protestants who are NOT Lutheran allowed to partake?

Papacy -- Is there an "infallible" Lutheran authority, or is it like most other Faiths and we are just human beings who accept guidance from the Holy Spirit? (The Papacy is the #1 reason I can never accept Catholicism.... I'm a History nut with a Bachelor's degree in History, and study of the History of the Papacy is enough to make you never believe in the papacy, not even for a minute)

Baptism -- immersion or sprinkle? Infant baptism or upon making a conscious choice and commitment?

Scripture -- Sole authority or not?

Worship style -- singing, music? What kind? Solemn adoration or joyful praise? Hand waving, dancing, etc? Physical gestures? Statues or other physical objects (i.e. rosary?)... Is there a "sermon" that allows you to get a real message out of it (perhaps thematic??) or is it like the Homily, rather dry?? What percentage of the church service is worship ritual (singing, communion, "other" ritual) vs. the actual message from the Minister?... Are the messages usually relevant with specific examples for life and heavy use of Scriptural support?

I guess, what I'm really looking for is to find out the big similarities and big differences. I'm want us both (me and the girl I'm dating) to write down the "my church MUST believe this" and "my church MUST do this ritual" etc so that we can see if we will EVER be compatible religiously... as it is, I'm not too happy about the idea of marrying and having my children forced to become Catholic or else risk an Ecclesiastical Curse upon us (Anathema) as indicated by the RCC!!! Fear is such a horrible way to convince people to follow the church's rules.

Thanks guys,

Michael
ZeroTx,

Hopefully, Spirituality of the Cross, shows up soon to your address. When it comes, you will have a clear explanation of the faith of the first Evangelicals. While outwardly, it may appear that Lutheranism and Roman Catholicism are similiar, actually we differ as North differs from South. In truth, we are polar opposites. If you want a detailed explanation of the differences between Rome and us, then the Book of Concord outlines our definitive differences better than anything else. Luther concluded that the fundamental point of our dissent, was the article of Free Will. While Rome would profess that man is wounded from the Fall, Lutheranism boldly declares that man is completely broken and utterly ruined.

SYNERGISM VS. MONERGISM

Synergism is defined as the doctrine that individual salvation is achieved through a combination of human will and divine grace. Rome would profess that man is left in a state of neutrality and can, with a bit of help, choose God. Monergism is defined as the doctine that individual salvation is achieved solely through and because of God, with no contribution of man.When one adheres to Monergistic Justification but believes in Synergistic Sanctification, one takes from the left hand what is first offered in the right. If one claims Monergistic Justification, but believes that man can contribute, even in great weakness, to the sustenance of man's righteousness, in actuality, he is a believer in Synergistic Justification. Lutherans reject synergism completely and rightly proclaim Monergistic Jusification and Sanctification. God saves and keeps man...completely! Lutheranism confesses that man is evil and rebellious from conception to earthly death, and the only hope for salvation is God. Vicarious Atonement was achieved upon the Cross by Christ (His perfect Obedience and and Perfect Sacrifice) nearly 2000 years ago, His Righteousness is reckoned to us, miserable and undeserving sinners that we are. We believe that this saving faith comes to us, and that continually, by Word and Sacrament. All is contingent upon the Word of God.


Lutheran Sanctification

We receive faith, but only passively as Steve Parks meetly describes in his CR of TPDL,

"The Lutheran Confessions, however, make it quite clear that such a [synergistic] view is unbiblical:

From this, then, it follows that as soon as the Holy Ghost, as has been said, through the Word and holy Sacraments, has begun in us this His work of regeneration and renewal, it is certain that through the power of the Holy Ghost we can and should cooperate, although still in great weakness. But this [that we cooperate] does not occur from our carnal natural powers, but from the new powers and gifts which the Holy Ghost has begun in us in conversion, as St. Paul expressly and earnestly exhorts that as workers together with Him we receive not the grace of God in vain, 2 Cor. 6, 1. But this is to be understood in no other way than that the converted man does good to such an extent and so long as God by His Holy Spirit rules, guides, and leads him, and that as soon as God would withdraw His gracious hand from him, he could not for a moment persevere in obedience to God. But if this were understood thus [if any one would take the expression of St. Paul in this sense], that the converted man cooperates with the Holy Ghost in the manner as when two horses together draw a wagon, this could in no way be conceded without prejudice to the divine truth.

Thus, man cooperates in his sanctification, but only insofar as he is involved in it. God begins, continues, and completes His work in the redeemed. We do not take the initiative, nor are we even equal partners in the endeavor. Instead, our cooperation is passive, inasmuch as “it is God who works in you both to will and to do for His good pleasure” (Phil. 2:13).

Shift over and I am late for a lunch date! I gots to go. I will answer some of your specific questions later.

Repent and trust you are forgiven according to the Promises of Christ!

Pax Christi,

ChiRho
__________________
"This doctrine is what makes Christianity Christianity. You've got to get across that the righteousness that saves isn't a change in the human heart, it's a declared sentence, "I declare you innocent." And we say, "But I'm not innocent, I'm guilty as sin!" But the judge says, "I know, but I didn't say that, I said I declared you innocent." That's what Christianity is. It's a declaration of innocence based on another's righteousness, and reckoned to you as if it were yours." Rod Rosenbladt
LUTHERAN LIBERTARIAN

Last edited by ChiRho; 7th May 2004 at 03:09 PM.
  #4  
Unread 3rd May 2004, 03:41 PM
JVAC's Avatar
Baptized into His name

29 Gender: Male Faith: Lutheran Party: US-Others Country: United States Member For 5 Years
 
Join Date: 28th November 2003
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 2,484
Blessings: 147,633
Reps: 882 (power: 0)
JVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really nice
Originally Posted by Michael
In another thread I discussed the fact that I am a Protestant who is presently dating a Catholic. It is my very limited-knowledge understanding that Lutherans and Catholics share many beliefs (more so than say a Baptist and a Catholic), and I was curious if someone could tell me in very brief "listed out" terms the things off the top of their head...


I guess, what I'm really looking for is to find out the big similarities and big differences. I'm want us both (me and the girl I'm dating) to write down the "my church MUST believe this" and "my church MUST do this ritual" etc so that we can see if we will EVER be compatible religiously... as it is, I'm not too happy about the idea of marrying and having my children forced to become Catholic or else risk an Ecclesiastical Curse upon us (Anathema) as indicated by the RCC!!! Fear is such a horrible way to convince people to follow the church's rules.
I didn't get a chance to reply to this part, the best part, because of my previous rush. However, I want to say that the Lutheran Church is a good middle ground for Protestant/Catholic couples. I compare it this way:

The Lutheran Church is mostly Protestant because:

We believe in Salvation by Grace alone, through Faith alone for the Glory of God alone
We believe in Scripture alone as the only infallable authority
We believe in Christ alone as the only way to the Father


The Lutheran Church is mostly Catholic because:

We have a Sacramental emphasis
We retain confession (all though private confession isn't necessary, and in the Lutheran church it is merely a Rite and not a Sacrament) and the Office of the Keys
We follow the ancient Church liturgy, complete with Lectionaries and Collects
We are confessional
I would like to encourage you all in this time, and if you could give me her name as well, I'd like to be praying for you guys!

-James
__________________
"Let us rather be of good courage and rejoice always as men who are being saved. Let us ponder in our soul that the Lord is with us, He who put the evil spirits to flight and made them impotent." -St Antony the Great

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
  #5  
Unread 3rd May 2004, 04:33 PM
Ecce Panis Angelorum

35 Gender: Male Faith: Catholic Country: United States Member For 5 Years
 
Join Date: 25th February 2004
Posts: 437
Blessings: 147,711
Reps: 291 (power: 0)
opus_dei is a jewel in the roughopus_dei is a jewel in the roughopus_dei is a jewel in the rough
if i remember correctly, i think that there were something on the order of 95 specific differences lutherans had with catholics.

actually, i'd like to see the list that all y'all come up with. i was in a wedding of a good friend of mine in a lutheran church. nice service, much different than i thought (in a good way).

congrats on your "own" forum. makes it hard to goto one place for my PRE goodness though.

cheers.

o.d.

[edit] as per james' post, he is lutheran, she catholic. and it did seem to be a good fit, at least for them.
  #6  
Unread 3rd May 2004, 04:46 PM
JVAC's Avatar
Baptized into His name

29 Gender: Male Faith: Lutheran Party: US-Others Country: United States Member For 5 Years
 
Join Date: 28th November 2003
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 2,484
Blessings: 147,633
Reps: 882 (power: 0)
JVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really niceJVAC is just really nice
Originally Posted by Opus_Dei
if i remember correctly, i think that there were something on the order of 95 specific differences lutherans had with catholics.
Hello Opus!!

Actually Martin Luther wrote the 95 thesis in deffense of the Pope against people like Johann Tetzel, who he thought were subverting the Pope's authority and burdening the Christian consciences. Only later did Luther find out that the Pope was the one behind indulgences.

-James
__________________
"Let us rather be of good courage and rejoice always as men who are being saved. Let us ponder in our soul that the Lord is with us, He who put the evil spirits to flight and made them impotent." -St Antony the Great

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
  #7  
Unread 3rd May 2004, 04:52 PM
Ecce Panis Angelorum

35 Gender: Male Faith: Catholic Country: United States Member For 5 Years
 
Join Date: 25th February 2004
Posts: 437
Blessings: 147,711
Reps: 291 (power: 0)
opus_dei is a jewel in the roughopus_dei is a jewel in the roughopus_dei is a jewel in the rough
Originally Posted by JVAC
Hello Opus!!

Actually Martin Luther wrote the 95 thesis in deffense of the Pope against people like Johann Tetzel, who he thought were subverting the Pope's authority and burdening the Christian consciences. Only later did Luther find out that the Pope was the one behind indulgences.

-James
oh, i know. i figured that i'd just act the ignorant catholic part. my buddy who was married came from a missouri synod family where the father was a minister and the mother was a teacher in a private lutheran school. i've heard many times what an incorrigible papist i am. heh.

cheers.
  #8  
Unread 3rd May 2004, 10:16 PM
Phoebe's Avatar
TwoBrickShyOfAFullLoad

47 Gender: Female Married Faith: Lutheran Country: United States Member For 5 Years Fisherman
View Profile Pic
 
Join Date: 22nd August 2002
Location: Iowa
Posts: 7,489
Blessings: 148,926
My Mood Twisted
Reps: 244,222,268 (power: 244,242)
Phoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond repute
Phoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond reputePhoebe has a reputation beyond repute
Originally Posted by opus_dei
oh, i know. i figured that i'd just act the ignorant catholic part. my buddy who was married came from a missouri synod family where the father was a minister and the mother was a teacher in a private lutheran school. i've heard many times what an incorrigible papist i am. heh.

cheers.
That was funny. I was hoping you were playing "dumb."
__________________
Oh, well, it's been a good day in hell, and tomorrow I'll be glory bound.-Glenn Frey and Don Henley
-Kim
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
  #9  
Unread 4th May 2004, 08:28 AM
ChiRho's Avatar
Confessional Lutheran Catholic

34 Gender: Male Faith: Lutheran Party: US-Libertarian Country: United States Member For 5 Years
View Profile Pic
 
Join Date: 5th March 2004
Location: Fort Wayne
Posts: 1,988
Blessings: 70,471
My Mood Amused
Reps: 3,378,810 (power: 3,390)
ChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant future
ChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant futureChiRho has a brilliant future
ZeroTX

Hi guys,
In another thread I discussed the fact that I am a Protestant who is presently dating a Catholic.
Much luck to you!

It is my very limited-knowledge understanding that Lutherans and Catholics share many beliefs (more so than say a Baptist and a Catholic), and I was curious if someone could tell me in very brief "listed out" terms the things off the top of their head...
If the issues are distilled to there very essence, a Baptist is more like a Roman Catholic, than a Lutheran and a Romanist!

*SEE PREVIOUS POST (#3)

for instance..

Eucharist/Communion/Lord's Supper -- "real presence" or "symbolic gesture of faith"? Provided every week, or what frequency? Requirements to take communion? Protestants who are NOT Lutheran allowed to partake?
Real Physical Presence, as we cannot argue with the clear words of Christ. Rome attempts to explain this Divine Mystery, while Lutherans do not. We take Christ at His words and believe.

How often a Lutheran Church offers Holy Communion varies from church to church. Typically, a LCMS Church, will offer Communion every Sunday and some throughout the week as well.


Papacy -- Is there an "infallible" Lutheran authority, or is it like most other Faiths and we are just human beings who accept guidance from the Holy Spirit? (The Papacy is the #1 reason I can never accept Catholicism.... I'm a History nut with a Bachelor's degree in History, and study of the History of the Papacy is enough to make you never believe in the papacy, not even for a minute)
While Lutherans certainly appeal to their Fathers (Pastors) as authority, it is not with the understanding that any man is infallible. So long as my Pastor proclaims the truth of Scripture and stands in the stead of Christ, then I appeal. When a Pastor strayes from Scripture and the correct interpretation of the Book of Concord, then we rough him up a bit.


Baptism -- immersion or sprinkle? Infant baptism or upon making a conscious choice and commitment?
Since there is never an amount of water instituted in Holy Scripture, the Lutherans refrain from adding a requirement that God has not.

Holy Baptism for all. We think little of the conscious choice and the empty commitments of man. In Christ we trust.

Scripture -- Sole authority or not?
Sola Scriptura.

Worship style -- singing, music?
Yes. Confession put to song.

What kind? Solemn adoration or joyful praise? Hand waving, dancing, etc? Physical gestures? Statues or other physical objects (i.e. rosary?)...
This should vary from church to church. I would hope there is no dancing and rolling in the aisles, but nothing would shock me.


Is there a "sermon" that allows you to get a real message out of it (perhaps thematic??) or is it like the Homily, rather dry??
In a Lutheran Church, you will get a sermon or Homily that properly distinguishes Law and Gospel. The Homily usually ties in with the three readings each week (O.T., Epistle, Gospel). You will receive what you need- assurance of the Promises of Christ


What percentage of the church service is worship ritual (singing, communion, "other" ritual) vs. the actual message from the Minister?... Are the messages usually relevant with specific examples for life and heavy use of Scriptural support?
Depends on the individual church, but usually, less like the format or style of a modern evangelical church.

I guess, what I'm really looking for is to find out the big similarities and big differences. I'm want us both (me and the girl I'm dating) to write down the "my church MUST believe this" and "my church MUST do this ritual" etc so that we can see if we will EVER be compatible religiously... as it is, I'm not too happy about the idea of marrying and having my children forced to become Catholic or else risk an Ecclesiastical Curse upon us (Anathema) as indicated by the RCC!!! Fear is such a horrible way to convince people to follow the church's rules.
Seriously, you should visit a local LCMS Pastor and speak with him about these issues.


Lutheranism is unlike anything else!

Pax Christi,

ChiRho
__________________
"This doctrine is what makes Christianity Christianity. You've got to get across that the righteousness that saves isn't a change in the human heart, it's a declared sentence, "I declare you innocent." And we say, "But I'm not innocent, I'm guilty as sin!" But the judge says, "I know, but I didn't say that, I said I declared you innocent." That's what Christianity is. It's a declaration of innocence based on another's righteousness, and reckoned to you as if it were yours." Rod Rosenbladt
LUTHERAN LIBERTARIAN

Last edited by ChiRho; 7th May 2004 at 12:24 PM.
  #10  
Unread 4th May 2004, 02:28 PM
Proud Papist's Avatar
Member

Faith: Catholic Country: Vatican City State Member For 5 Years
 
Join Date: 6th April 2004
Location: New York City
Posts: 70
Blessings: 162,790
Reps: 188 (power: 0)
Proud Papist has a spectacular aura aboutProud Papist has a spectacular aura about
Originally Posted by ChiRho
So long as my Pastor proclaims the truth of Scripture and stands in the stead of Christ, then I appeal. When a Pastor strayes from Scripture and the correct interpretation of the Book of Concord, then we rough him up a bit.
So is authority (for lack of a better word) vested in the general consensus of the congregation? How is the congregation sure that it right and the pastor may be wrong? Is it possible for the congregation to be wrong while a pastor tries valiantly to hold down the fort? Is there a final authority in church disputes?

Thanks. I am very interested into looking deeper in Lutheranism and am finding this forum a real help.

Regards,
Douglas
Closed Thread


Return to Theologia Crucis - Lutherans

Thread Tools
Display Modes


 
Become a CF Site Supporter Today and Make These Ads Go Away!


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:56 PM.